Tag: Imprint

Imprint :: Adhesive Sounds

Weird_Canada-Adhesive_Sounds

Adhesive Sounds pulled up to the cassette club in style this spring with an ambitious 10-release batch hitting the decks. A/S architect Kelly Chia is an Albertan expat splitting his time between Edmonton and Toronto, with diverse releases from artists spanning the distance in between. He likens the label’s offerings to “tuning into radio waves from an alternative world”, gluing together Form’s mutant techno, Hobo Cubes’ eerie electroacoustics, the swooning samples of Surely I Come Quickly and so much more. We dropped Kelly a quick set of questions to get the scoop on his prolific activities and plans for the future.


Surely I Come Quickly – Angkor


Form – Trips


Hobo Cubes – Semblance, Is Ripe With Blooming Gestures

Jesse Locke: Adhesive Sounds seemed like it emerged out of nowhere in April with a fully realized sonic and visual aesthetic. How long had you been scheming before launching the label, and what inspired you to take the plunge?

Kelly Chia: Time was definitely on my side, as I was affected with a disorder of the immune system keeping me housebound for a large period of this past year. Having to drop school and unable to leave the indoors, I was forced to find some kind of outlet, project, activity.

I started listening to more ambient, experimental, and soundscape music during this time. I was getting big into stuff by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth, John Cage, Erik Satie… a lot of film scores and works by modern composers.

Design and music to me have always had a special relationship. Particularly when you think of some of the seminal record labels. To me, the look is just as important and inspiring as the sound. The imagery provides an atmosphere and suggests an overall mood. It creates a distinct style or aesthetic. A good record cover should reflect the music.

I’m a big fan of Vaughan Oliver’s 4AD sleeve designs – abstract, dreamlike, elegant – his work defines 4AD as much as the music. Peter Saville, who created the art for Factory Records, is another favourite of mine.

Music has always been a huge part of my life and starting a label has always been on the top of my “to do” list. Cassettes tapes are more affordable to produce than vinyl and have a warmth that is missing from digital and CDs. So when it came to put a label together it was just following my intuition and placing the right pieces in order.

Two of the releases from your first batch, Wasted Cathedral’s Pleasant Valley and Japanese Treats’ *E 468, feature solo side-projects from better known bands/artists (Shooting Guns and Ben Disaster, respectively). Do you put any stock into releasing music from projects that people may not be familiar with?

Growing up in the age of cassette tapes and compiling mix tapes, it was always exciting to discover and share up and coming acts or obscure tracks with others.

Side projects are interesting because you’re giving an opportunity for listeners to hear another side of an otherwise familiar artist’s work. It’s almost like tuning into radio waves from an alternative world.

You’ve also had a strong slate of releases from prairie-based artists including the two previously mentioned, plus Evan A. James from Edmonton and two different guises of Saskatoon’s Will Kaufhold (Body Lvl and Form). Coming from Edmonton yourself, do you feel it’s important to represent regions that may be overlooked in other parts of the country?

I think it’s important to provide a platform for people to check out work by artists in regions that are typically overlooked. I owe a lot of gratitude to the independent shops that introduced me to some of my favourite bands.

I certainly think one’s surroundings have a profound influence on their outlook, interests and any creative work they produce. Maybe to a lesser degree now than the time before the internet, instant news and social media, but even TV and radio were massive then. Still, where you live – its structures, people, and particular places – are going to have a huge influence on artists and the work they produce.

You’ve recently made the move to Toronto, although I understand you’re back out west at the moment. What sorts of differences have you noticed in the local scenes on both sides of the country?

Although geographically isolated, Edmonton should be recognized for its all-ages shows and tight-knit music scene. Everyone is usually well acquainted with each other and bands mix socially and creatively. The scene in Toronto seems to be more divided. You don’t see too many shows with a wide range of musical acts. Noise bands tend to play with other noise bands, for example. You see that with the audiences, too.

You’ve also done tapes for some Montreal heavy-hitters: Demonstration Synthesis and the almighty Hobo Cubes. How did you hook up with them?

Shortly after his second release on Rotifer, Danny (Demonstration Synthesis) was looking to unleash a series of recordings for a fairly new project he’s been working on at the time. Adhesive Sounds was just starting out and happened to be one of the labels he approached. We have since released three tapes (DS3 + DS8 + DS11) by Demonstration Synthesis. DS11 was released in late September.

During talks of finalizing plans on a new tape release by Form, Will had also been looking for a physical release for his work with Body Lvl, which he collaborates with his pal Metha Youngs. Citing the almighty Hobo Cubes as a heavy influence, we decided it would be a perfect opportunity to approach Frank for a track to compliment theirs on the b-side.

Your latest tape from the California-based artist Memory Leaks Onto The Rug also bucked the Canadian-only trend. I appreciate the personalized aspect of his ‘recycled’ releases in super limited editions, and saw the album you put out was originally a CDr edition of 1. Is this ephemeral nature coupled with the mysterious source material of his music part of the appeal for you too?

It is but it isn’t. The record sleeve was a very democratic way of inspiring listeners through art and design. Music packaging has become very specialized. Even though I do appreciate limited edition and special releases, I much prefer the idea that it used to be available to everyone.

For me there has always been an appeal for discovering a title at a local record shop or the excitement of mail ordering and anticipating the arrival of a package. Although digital music files are much more convenient and take up less space, records and their packaging are important because the designs and images created provide a certain mystique offering a more memorable product.

The all-over prints of your j-cards are especially handsome. Do you handle the visual aspect of the label as well?

Visually I was striving for consistency in approach with care and quality. Attention to detail with the layout and typography. I tend to gravitate towards photo-based images with the current releases. Quite a few of them feature awesome photography by Will Kaufhold (Form, Body Lvl).

You’ve been cranking out releases at a pretty furious pace. Do you plan to maintain that?

With a new school year on the horizon, I’ll have a little less time to focus on the label but I definitely plan to remain active with releases. It has been a busy time for A/S with releases by Gunwale, Strange Mountain, Wether, Demonstration Synthesis, Seeami and Surely I Come Quickly coming out on Cassette Store Day. Also, releases by James Benjamin, Mark Aubert and Dj Dj Tanner are due out later this year.

I had a chance to collaborate on a project titled Today with Ian Martin in Edmonton this summer at his amazing Twilight Living Room studio. Hoping to have that released later this year / early 2015.

What does the future hold for A/S?

Sometime in the new year, A/S would also like get into producing printed matter, possibly a magazine. Also maybe introducing the lathe-cut record format for certain releases in the distant future.


Adhesive Sounds discography (to date)
AS001 – Japanese Treats – *E 468
AS002 – Little Blue – Songep
AS003 – Wasted Cathedral – Pleasant Valley
AS004 – Demonstration Synthesis – DS3
AS005 – Evan A. James – s/t
AS006 – Body Lvl / Hobo Cubes – Split
AS007 – Form – Trips
AS008 – Karl Fousek – Codicil
AS009 – Memory Leaks Onto The Rug – OOOOOOOOO
AS010 – Demonstration Synthesis – DS3
AS011 – Gunwale – Red Earth
AS012 – Strange Mountain – A Quiet Dynasty
AS013 – Wether – Alien Lizard
AS014 – Demonstration Synthesis – DS11
AS015 – Seeami – Health & Safety
AS016 – Surely I Come Quickly – Lost Reverie

Le printemps dernier, Adhesive Sounds a fait une entrée remarquée dans le clan des cassettes en mettant sur les tablettes une ambitieuse série de 10 enregistrements. L’architecte d’A/S, Kelly Chia, est un ex-Albertain qui partage son temps entre Edmonton et Toronto, des morceaux de divers artistes chevauchant la distance entre les deux. Il met en parallèle les offres du label et le fait de « se brancher aux ondes radiophoniques d’un monde alternatif », en mettant ensemble la techno mutante de Form et l’étrange électroacoustique de Hobo Cubes, les échantillons qui font tomber en pâmoison de Surely I Come Quickly et tant d’autres. Nous avons posé quelques questions à Kelly pour en apprendre davantage sur ses activités prolifiques et ses plans pour l’avenir.


Surely I Come Quickly – Angkor


Form – Trips


Hobo Cubes – Semblance, Is Ripe With Blooming Gestures

Jesse Locke : On dirait qu’Adhesive Sounds est sorti de nulle part en avril avec une esthétique visuelle et acoustique pleinement accomplie. Combien de temps avez-vous mis à organiser le label avant de le lancer? Qu’est-ce qui vous a convaincu de faire le saut?

Kelly Chia : Le temps a joué en ma faveur. L’année dernière, j’ai souffert d’une affectation du système immunitaire qui m’a obligé à rester à la maison pendant de longues périodes. J’ai dû abandonner l’école, et je ne pouvais pas sortir à l’extérieur. Je devais donc trouver un exutoire, un projet, une activité.

Je me suis alors mis à écouter plus de musique d’ambiance, expérimentale et de paysage sonore. Je me suis surtout intéressé à John Carpenter, à Alan Howarth, à John Cage, à Erik Satie… aux trames sonores et à des œuvres de compositeurs modernes.

Pour moi, le design et la musique ont toujours eu une relation particulière. Surtout si on pense à certains des labels précurseurs. Je crois que l’aspect visuel est tout aussi important et inspirant que l’acoustique. L’imagerie offre une atmosphère et suggère une ambiance générale. Elle crée un style ou une esthétique uniques. Une bonne pochette de disque devrait être le reflet de la musique.

J’admire beaucoup le design des pochettes 4AD de Vaughan Oliver (abstrait, onirique, élégant) – son travail définit 4AD autant que la musique. Un autre de mes favoris est Peter Saville qui a créé des illustrations pour Factory Records.

La musique a toujours fait partie de ma vie, et lancer un label a toujours été une priorité pour moi. Les cassettes coûtent moins cher à produire que les vinyles. Elles dégagent aussi une chaleur qui fait défaut au format numérique et aux CD. Quand le moment est venu de mettre sur pied un label, je n’avais qu’à suivre mon instinct et à mettre les bons morceaux aux bons endroits.

Deux cassettes de votre première série, Pleasant Valley de Wasted Cathedral et *E 468 de Japanese Treats, présentent des projets solos d’artistes de groupes plus connus (Shooting Guns et Ben Disaster, respectivement). Misez-vous sur la musique associée à des projets qui feront sortir les gens de leur zone de confort?

Comme j’ai grandi avec les cassettes, à faire des compilations, c’était toujours électrisant de découvrir de nouveaux artistes émergents et des morceaux indéfinissables, de les échanger avec d’autres. Les projets parallèles sont intéressants pour donner la chance à ceux qui écoutent d’entendre un côté insoupçonné du travail d’un artiste. C’est presque comme se brancher aux ondes radiophoniques d’un univers alternatif.

Vous avez aussi une liste solide de pièces d’artistes originaires des Prairies, dont les deux mentionnés plus haut, et Evan A. James d’Edmonton, et deux volets différents du Saskatoonais Will Kaufhold (Body Lvl et Form). Étant vous-même originaire d’Edmonton, croyez-vous qu’il soit important de représenter des régions qui sont ignorées ailleurs au pays?

Je crois qu’il est important d’offrir une plateforme où les gens peuvent trouver des artistes de régions qui sont normalement ignorées. Je suis très reconnaissant aux magasins de musique indépendants qui m’ont fait connaître certains de mes groupes favoris.

Je crois sincèrement que notre environnement influence profondément notre perspective, nos intérêts et tout ce que nous créons. Peut-être moins aujourd’hui qu’à l’époque avant Internet, l’actualité instantanée et les médias sociaux, quoique même la télé et la radio étaient importantes à l’époque. Malgré tout ça, votre milieu, sa structure, ses gens et ses lieux particuliers influenceront grandement les artistes et leurs créations.

Vous êtes récemment déménagé à Toronto, mais je comprends que vous êtes en ce moment dans l’Ouest. En quoi les scènes locales des deux côtés du pays sont-elles différentes?

Même si Edmonton est isolée géographiquement, elle devrait être reconnue pour ses spectacles pour tous les âges et sa scène musicale « tissée serrée ». En général, tout le monde se connaît bien et les groupes se fréquentent socialement et collaborent créativement. La scène de Toronto semble plus divisée. Il y a peu de spectacles offrant un large éventail de formations musicales. Les groupes noise ont tendance à jouer avec d’autres groupes noise, par exemple. C’est la même chose avec le public.

Vous avez aussi produit des cassettes pour des poids lourds de Montréal : Demonstration Synthesis et les tout-puissants Hobo Cubes. Comment les avez-vous rencontrés?

Peu après son deuxième album sur Rotifer, Danny (Demonstration Synthesis) voulait sortir une série d’enregistrements associés à un projet assez nouveau sur lequel il travaillait à l’époque. Adhesive Sounds en était à ses débuts et nous sommes un des labels qu’il a approché. Depuis, nous avons produit deux cassettes (DS3 et DS8) de Demonstration Synthesis, et une autre est en route. DS11 est sortie à la fin septembre.

Pendant des discussions à propos de l’achèvement d’une nouvelle cassette par Form, Will cherchait aussi à sortir, dans un format physique, ses enregistrements avec Body Lvl, sur lesquels il collabore avec son ami Metha Youngs. En faisant référence aux tout-puissants Hobo Cubes, nous avons décidé que c’était l’occasion parfaite pour approcher Frank et lui offrir une chanson pour agrémenter leur face B.

Votre dernière cassette du groupe californien Memory Leaks Onto The Rug va à l’encontre de la tendance uniquement canadienne. J’apprécie l’aspect personnalisé de ces sorties « recyclées » en éditions super limitées, et j’ai vu que l’album que vous avez produit était originalement une édition sous forme de CD-R unique. Est-ce que la nature éphémère associée au matériel source mystérieux de sa musique fait partie de ce qui vous attire aussi?

Oui et non. La pochette de l’album était une façon très démocratique d’inspirer les auditeurs au moyen de l’art et du design. L’emballage de la musique est devenu une spécialisation. Même si j’aime les éditions limitées et les sorties spéciales, j’aime encore plus l’idée que tout le monde y avait un jour accès.

J’ai toujours trouvé qu’il était attrayant de découvrir un album dans un magasin de musique local, ou enthousiasmant de commander par la poste et d’anticiper l’arrivée du colis. Même si la musique numérique est bien plus pratique et qu’elle prend moins de place, les disques et leur emballage sont importants parce que les designs et les images créés fournissent une certaine mystique offrant un produit plus marquant.

Les imprimés all-over des cartons des cassettes sont particulièrement beaux. Êtes-vous aussi responsable de l’aspect visuel du label?

Visuellement, je m’efforçais d’avoir une approche cohérente avec soin et qualité, un souci pour les détails en ce qui concerne la mise en page et la typographie. Pour les dernières sorties, j’ai tendance à être attiré par les images inspirées de photos. Un bon nombre d’entre elles mettent en vedette des photos géniales de Will Kaufhold (Form, Body Lvl).

Vous sortez des albums à un rythme d’enfer. Croyez-vous pouvoir continuer au même rythme?

La reprise des classes approche, j’aurai donc un peu moins de temps à consacrer au label, mais j’ai l’intention de rester actif. Les prochaines sorties de Gunwale, Strange Mountain, Wether, Demonstration Synthesis, Seeami et Surely I Come Quickly, dont l’album est sorti lors de la Journée de la cassette (Cassette Store Day), garderont A/S occupé au cours des prochains mois. On prévoit aussi sortir des albums de James Benjamin, Mark Aubert et Dj Dj Tanner plus tard cette année.

Cet été, à Edmonton, j’ai eu la chance de collaborer sur un projet intitulé « Today with Ian Martin » à son studio Twilight Living Room. On espère sortir ça plus tard cette année ou au début de 2015.

Quelles sont les perspectives d’avenir d’A/S?

Au cours de la nouvelle année, A/S aimerait commencer à produire des œuvres imprimées, peut-être un magazine. Peut-être offrir certains enregistrements en format vinyle dans un avenir rapproché.


Discographie d’Adhesive Sounds (à ce jour)
AS001 – Japanese Treats – *E 468
AS002 – Little Blue – Songep
AS003 – Wasted Cathedral – Pleasant Valley
AS004 – Demonstration Synthesis – DS3
AS005 – Evan A. James – s/t
AS006 – Body Lvl / Hobo Cubes – Split
AS007 – Form – Trips
AS008 – Karl Fousek – Codicil
AS009 – Memory Leaks Onto The Rug – OOOOOOOOO
AS010 – Demonstration Synthesis – DS3
AS011 – Gunwale – Red Earth
AS012 – Strange Mountain – A Quiet Dynasty
AS013 – Wether – Alien Lizard
AS014 – Demonstration Synthesis – DS11
AS015 – Seeami – Health & Safety
AS016 – Surely I Come Quickly – Lost Reverie

Imprint :: Tenzier

Tenzier-TNZR050-053-web

Montreal’s Tenzier states its aims plainly: “To preserve, celebrate and disseminate archival recordings by Quebec avant-garde artists.” From the jump-cut plunderphonics of Étienne O’Leary to the electroacoustic fever dreams of Gisèle Ricard, these anomalous offerings from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s provide a fascinating glimpse into an unheralded history. Tenzier’s four LPs (to date) are not simply reissues, but instead sonic pearls scooped up from private collections and made available for the first time. Weird Canada spoke to Eric Fillion, the chief archivist of Quebec’s avant past.

 

Bernard Gagnon – Totem Ben

Gisèle Ricard – Je Vous Aime

Étienne O’Leary – Day Tripper (excerpt)

Le Quatuor de Jazz Libre du Québec – Sans Titre

 

Jesse Locke: What inspired you to start this project with such a specific regional focus?

Eric Fillion: I’m from Montreal, and have a clear attachment to Quebec. I’ve been playing music here for many, many years, and had the sense that there was a history that needed to be uncovered. Doing Tenzier is a way of allowing connections to be made. For each of the releases, I try to match an older musician with a current visual artist. For example, Sabrina Ratté did the artwork for the Gisèle Ricard LP, and Felix Morel did the collage for Bernard Gagnon. Match made in heaven there!

The regional focus also allows me to meet the musicians, not just communicate by email or phone. Gisèle Ricard is in Quebec City, so it’s a short drive there to meet with her. Bernard Gagnon and former members of the Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec are in Montreal. Lunch is always an option and we try to meet regularly. The human component of the project is huge, and it’s something I didn’t really understand at first or anticipate. The ability to work directly with these artists is something that I wouldn’t change. I’m also conducting doctoral research in history, and my interests deal with Quebec’s cultural production. The music I research for Tenzier is sort of out there compared to what I’m studying at a university level, but there’s still a connection.

Ultimately, I think it would be great if other people did similar projects. If 10 or 15 people in Canada wanted to set up labels or organizations to focus on their specific cities or provinces, you would get a much more complete history of avant or underground music. Maybe I’m dreaming here, but I think there’s a possibility to do this in other places. Montreal and Quebec have had a dynamic music scene for decades, but I know many other areas have that as well.

Besides the artists’ location, what other criteria do you have for the music you choose to release?

Tenzier’s releases are not reissues — they are archival recordings that have never been made available. I’m interested in voices from the margins, meaning artists that don’t really fit the dominant narratives about Quebec’s cultural production for the period I’m interested in: the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. Often, it comes from people making experimental music that didn’t end up teaching in universities or refused, for one reason or another, to associate with the province’s key cultural institutions. As such, their contributions may have gone unnoticed or undocumented for the new generations to explore.

One good example is Bernard Gagnon, who’s been active since the late 1960s. He had been involved in every major experimental or underground scene in Quebec, and contributed to several Musique Actuelle LPs, but never released a record under his own name. Going through his archives was great, because he had tons of reels. Gisèle Ricard had also been really active in Quebec City, but never released anything outside of the Capac 7”.

Releasing records is only part of Tenzier’s mandate, though. I try to put out one LP each year, usually in the fall, but parallel to that I’m also collecting material – recordings, visuals, correspondence – when I can and slowly digitizing things for future releases or research purposes. At some point, I would love to turn Tenzier into some kind of research center. The records are a way of making sure there’s a trace left in the present, and we deposit a copy at the National Library in Ottawa, as well as the Quebec National Library. All of a sudden, these artists and their music exist, making it possible for people like me who are doing research to have access much more quickly to a growing body of works. Ultimately, I would like to make all the documents that have been digitized but not released available to people.

Last summer, I partnered with the Videographe, which is a video co-op set up in 1971 through the NFB. In 1973 it became a non-profit organization, and they have tons of experimental videos that combine experimental music. Tenzier prepared a short program titled Québec électronique for the 2013 edition of the Suoni Per Il Popolo. It featured people like Richard Martin, who went to the U.S. and studied with Alvin Lucier. I’m working with the Videographe to disseminate those videos online, and have interviewed Richard Martin and added that to the archive. All of this falls under Tenzier’s mandate.

Bernard Gagnon live at Le Beat, 1983.

Bernard Gagnon live at Le Beat, 1983.

So far, your releases have come out in chronological order, from Etienne O’Leary in the 1960s to Gisele Ricard in the 1980s. Will you continue this pattern, or start bouncing around in time?

I didn’t realize I was doing that [laughs]. That was a total accident and I didn’t plan it that way, so yes, I am going to start bouncing around. Tenzier will never go past the 1980s, as it became much easier from the ’80s onward for artists to release their own tapes or records. In Quebec, you had Ambiances Magnétiques, which did a fantastic job of documenting whole spectrums of experimental or weird music, but before that there was really nothing. The NFB put out a soundtrack and that was great, but it was a one-off project. Otherwise, McGill had a record label putting out material recorded in the university’s electronic music studio, and Radio Canada International released a few records of electroacoustic compositions. Aside from that, there were no small labels, so there is a lot of music made in the ’60 and ’70s recorded on 1/4” tapes that are just sitting in boxes. I think I’ll be busy enough focusing on those three decades.

I also wanted to ask about the numbering of your releases. On Discogs, your trio CD with Dominic Vanchesteing and Alexandre St-Onge is listed as TNZR001, and then it jumps straight to TNZR050. Are there 49 lost releases floating in the ether?

Nothing is missing. Initially, when I started Tenzier it was towards the end of Pas Chic Chic, and I wanted to set up an infrastructure for musicians to collaborate. This included myself, and I wanted to reach out to musicians that I had a tremendous respect for, but hadn’t had the chance to work with. The mini-CD series, numbers one to 49, was meant to serve that purpose. At the same time, I started working on the Etienne O’Leary LP and decided that #50 onward would be the historical releases from Tenzier. Within four or five months of that time, I made the decision to go back to school to continue graduate work. I subsequently quit playing music to focus on my research. It became apparent to me that Tenzier could become a vehicle to reconcile my academic interests with my background as a musician. This allowed me to stay in touch with musicians and visual artists, and contribute something concrete. After Tenzier 001, I stopped playing music and that series ended there.

What plans do you have moving forward? Can you give us a sneak peek into any upcoming releases or activities?

I can’t really talk about releases yet because I haven’t had a chance to sit down with the interested parties. I do plan on releasing another LP in the fall though, and am currently digitizing a bunch of material that I’m super excited about. Each year I try to organize an event or kind of retrospective as well, and this fall I’m working with Jean-Pierre Boyer, who made experimental videos in the early ’70s. He invented his own video-synthesizer, which he named the Boyétizeur, so we’re going to show his work and have a live performance.

I was really excited to see Gisèle Ricard’s collaboration with Bernard Bonnier on the new Tenzier LP. Casse-Tête Musique Concrète is so wild. Do you know about any more music that he recorded?

That’s an amazing record. There’s also the Capac 7”, but nothing else in terms of official releases. I would assume he has other material recorded, as Bernard Bonnier and Gisèle Ricard owned a studio together. Bernard passed away, but his son probably has reels stored somewhere in a basement. That would be worth looking into at some point.

What’s the weirdest music from Quebec you’ve ever heard?

To me, weird music is not a pejorative term. It’s brilliant music because it forces you to listen differently and takes you to new places. Quebec had so much weird music, especially in the 1980s. A lot of people were releasing cassettes back then (like nowadays, I guess) and you could find amazing stuff, demos and other strange sound objects, at L’Oblique. The first name that comes to mind is Les Biberons Bâtis, which was the project of Bruno Tanguay, also known as Satan Bélanger. Before Les Biberons Bâtis, Bruno was in a group called Turbine Depress, which is also truly singular music. I think you will enjoy Les Biberons Bâtis.

Tenzier Discography (To Date)

  • TNZR001 – Dominic Vanchesteing, Eric Fillion, Alexandre St-Onge – Untitled [Mini CD, 2010]
  • TNZR050 – Étienne O’Leary – Films Et Musiques Originales (1966 – 1968) [LP, 2010]
  • TNZR051 – Le Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec – 1973 [LP, 2011]
  • TNZR052 – Bernard Gagnon – Musique Électronique (1975-1983) [LP, 2012]
  • TNZR053 – Gisèle Ricard – Électroacoustique (1980-1987) [LP, 2013]

L’étiquette montréalaise Tenzier exprime pleinement ses objectifs: ‘’Préserver, célébrer et propager les enregistrements d’archives des artistes avant-gardistes du Québec.’’ Des phonétiques saccadées d’Étienne O’Leary aux rêves électro-acoustiques fièvreux de Gisèle Ricard, ces anormales offrandes des années 60, 70 et 80 pourvoient un aperçu fascinant à travers ces parcours méconnus. Les quatre LPs de Tenzier (jusqu’à maintenant) ne sont pas seulement des ré-éditions mais plutôt des perles sonores dénichées dans des collections personnelles et mises à notre disposition pour la première fois. Weird Canada a discuté avec Eric Fillion, l’archiviste en chef du passé avant-gardiste du Québec.

 

Bernard Gagnon – Totem Ben

Gisèle Ricard – Je Vous Aime

Étienne O’Leary – Day Tripper (excerpt)

Le Quatuor de Jazz Libre du Québec – Sans Titre

 

Jesse Locke: Qu’est-ce qui t’as inspiré à démarrer ce projet avec un focus régional si spécifique?

Éric Fillion: Je viens de Montréal et j’ai un attachement clair pour Québec. Je joue de la musique depuis plusieurs années et j’avais le sentiment qu’une histoire avait besoin d’être découverte. Tenzier est une manière de créer des connections. Pour chacune des sorties, j’essaie de joindre un musicien plus âgé avec un artiste en art visuel. Par exemple, Sabrina Ratté a créé la couverture pour le LP de Gisèle Ricard et Felix Morel a fait le collage pour Bernard Gagnon. Deux superbes harmonies!

Le focus régional me permet aussi de rencontrer les musiciens, pas seulement par courriel ou par téléphone. Gisèle Ricard habite la ville de Québec alors ce n’est qu’une courte promenade en voiture pour la rencontrer. Bernard Gagnon et les anciens membres du Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec sont à Montréal. On peut toujours aller dîner et on essaie de se voir souvent. Le contact humain est un aspect important du projet et ce n’est pas quelque chose auquel je pensais au début, que j’anticipais. L’opportunité de travailler directement avec les artistes n’est pas quelque chose que je changerais. J’effectue aussi des recherches doctorales en histoire et mes intérêts se concentrent sur la production culturelle québécoise. La musique que je recherche pour Tenzier est un peu intense comparé à ce que j’étudie à l’université mais il y a tout de même une connection.

Ultimement, je pense que ce serait génial si d’autres gens travaillaient sur des projets similaires. Si 10 ou 15 personnes au Canada voulaient démarrer des étiquettes ou des projets avec un focus sur leur ville ou leur région, nous aurions un catalogue beaucoup plus complet de la musique avant-gardiste et indépendante canadienne. Peut-être que je rêvasse, mais je pense qu’il y a une possibilité de le faire ailleurs. Montréal et Québec possèdent une scène musicale dynamique depuis des décennies, mais je sais que plusieurs autres endroits aussi.

À part la provenance des artistes, quels sont les autres critères selon lesquels tu choisis la musique à publier?

Les sorties de Tenzier ne sont pas des ré-éditions, ce sont des enregistrements d’archives qui n’ont jamais été disponibles. Je m’intéresse aux voix marginales, souvent des artistes qui ne concordent pas vraiment avec les dominantes narratives de la production culturelle Québécoise de cette période (1960-1970-1980). Souvent, ce sont des gens qui font de la musique expérimentale et qui n’ont pas réussi à enseigner à l’université ou qui, pour une raison ou une autre, ont refusé de s’associer avec quelconque institutions culturelles de la province. Leur contribution a pu passer inaperçue ou ne pas avoir été documentée pour les générations futures.

Un bon exemple est Bernard Gagnon, qui est actif depuis la fin des années 60. Il s’est impliqué dans chacune des importantes scènes expérimentales et underground du Québec et a contribué à plusieurs des long-jeux ‘’Musique Actuelle’’ mais n’a jamais sorti un album sous son propre nom. Parcourir ses archives était génial, parce qu’il a une tonne de bobines. Gisèle Ricard a aussi été très présente dans la ville de Québec mais n’a jamais sorti autre chose que Capac 7”.

Publier des disques n’est qu’une partie du mandat de Tenzier. J’essaie de sortir un LP chaque année, habituellement en automne, mais parallèlement je collectionne aussi du matériel – des enregistrements, du visuel, des correspondences – autant que possible et je le digitalise pour de futures publications ou pour la recherche. Un jour, j’aimerais que Tenzier devienne un genre de centre de recherche. Les LPs sont une façon de s’assurer qu’il y ait une trace dans le présent et nous déposons une copie à la Bibliothèque Nationale d’Ottawa et à celle du Québec. Soudainement, ces artistes et leur musique existent, ce qui permet aux gens comme moi qui font de la recherche, d’avoir accès plus facilement à ces informations. Ultimement, j’aimerais que tous les documents qui ont été digitalisés soient accessibles à tous.

L’été dernier, j’ai créé un partenariat avec le Vidéographe, une coopérative de production vidéo démarrée en 1971 à travers l’ONF. En 1973, c’est devenu un organisme à but non-lucratif et ils ont une tonne de vidéos expérimentaux qui combinent la musique expérimentale. Tenzier a préparé un court programme intitulé Québec électronique pour l’édition 2013 de Suoni Per II Popolo. Le programme présentait des gens comme Richard Martin, qui a passé du temps au États-Unis et a étudié avec Alvin Lucier. Je travaille avec le Videographe afin de distribuer ces vidéos sur le web et j’ai interviewé Richard Martin et ajouté le tout aux archives. Tout cela fait partie du mandat de Tenzier.

Bernard Gagnon live at Le Beat, 1983.

Bernard Gagnon en concert à Le Beat, 1983.

Jusqu’à maintenant, vos parutions sont sorties en ordre chronologique, d’Étienne O’Leary dans les années 60 à Gisèle Ricard dans les années 80. Vas-tu continuer avec ce modèle ou bondir d’années en années?

Je n’ai pas remarqué que je faisais ça [rires]. C’est un accident, je n’ai pas du tout planifié cela alors oui, je vais commencer à bondir d’années en années. Tenzier ne va jamais aller plus loin que les années 80, parce que c’est devenu beaucoup plus facile, à partir des années 80, de publier ses propres cassettes et albums. Au Québec, il y avait Ambiances Magnétiques, qui faisait un travail fantastique à documenter un large spectrum de musique bizarre et expérimentale, mais avant eux, rien. L’ONF a sortie une bande-sonore et c’était génial mais ce n’était qu’un truc unique. Par ailleurs, McGill avait sa propre étiquette qui publiait du matérial enregistré dans les studios de l’université et Radio-Canada International a publié quelques compositions électro-acoustiques. À part de cela, il n’y avait pas de petites maisons de disques, alors il y a beaucoup de musique enregistrée dans les années 60 et 70, sur des cassettes 1/4’’, qui ne font que dormir dans des boîtes. Je pense que je serai assez occupé en focusant sur ces trois décennies-là.

Je voulais aussi te parler de la numérotation de tes parutions. Sur Discogs, ton triple CD avec Dominic Vanchesteing et Alexandre St-Onge est listé TNZR001 et ensuite ça passe à TNZR050. Est-ce qu’il y a 40 copies flottant dans l’éther?

Rien n’est perdu. Initialement, j’ai commencé Tenzier à la fin de Pas Chic Chic, et je voulais mettre en place une infrastructure qui favorise la collaboration entre musiciens. Cela m’incluait et je voulais faire appel à des musiciens pour lesquels j’ai un immense respect mais avec lesquels je n’avais pas eu la chance de travailler. La mini-série CD, numéroté 1 à 49, a servi à cela. Au même moment, je commencais à travailler sur le LP d’Étienne O’Leary et j’ai décidé que tout ce qui sortirait à partir du numéro 50 serait les sorties historiques de Tenzier. Quatre ou cinq mois après, j’ai pris la décision de retourner à l’école pour poursuivre mes études doctorales. Subséquemment, j’ai arrêté de jouer de la musique pour me concentrer sur mes recherches. C’est devenu évident que Tenzier serait un véhicule parfait pour réconcilier mes intêrêts académiques et mon passé de musicien. Ça m’a permis de garder le contact avec des musiciens et des artistes en art visuel et d’y contribuer quelque chose de concret. Après Tenzier 001, j’ai arrêté de jouer de la musique et la série s’est arrêté là.

Quels sont tes plans futurs? Peux-tu nous donner un petit aperçu de tes prochaines parutions et activités?

Je ne peux pas vraiment discuter des parutions puisque je ne me suis pas encore assis pour en discuter avec les parties intéressées. J’ai l’intention de publier un LP cet automne et je suis présentement en train de digitaliser beaucoup de matériel super intéressant. Chaque année, j’essaie d’organiser un évènement ou une sorte de rétrospective et cet automne, je travaille avec Jean-Pierre Boyer, qui produisait de la vidéo expérimentale au début des années 70. Il a inventé son propre synthétiseur vidéo, qu’il a nommé le Boyétizeur, alors nous allons présenter son travail et des performances live.

J’étais super content de voir une collaboration entre Gisèle Ricard et Bernard Bonnier sur le nouveau LP de Tenzier. Casse-Tête Musique Concrète est si déjanté. Connais-tu d’autre musique qu’il a enregistré?

C’est un album génial. Il y a aussi le Capac 7”, mais aucune autres parutions officielles. Je présume qu’il a d’autres matériel enregistré parce que Bernard Bonnier et Gisèle Ricard possèdaient un studio ensemble. Bernard est décédé, mais son fils a probablement des bobines quelque-part dans un sous-sol. Ça vaudrait la peine d’y jeter un coup d’oeil.

Quelle est la musique du Québec la plus bizarre que tu aies écouté?

Selon moi, le terme ‘musique bizarre’ n’est pas péjoratif. C’est de la musique intelligente parce qu’elle force l’auditeur à écouter différemment et le transporte ailleurs. Le Québec a tellement produit de musique bizarre, en particulier dans les années 80. Beaucoup de gens sortaient des cassettes (comme maintenant, je pense) et on peut trouver des trucs vraiment formidables, des démos et d’autres échantillions sonores étranges, à l’Oblique. Le premier nom qui me vient en tête est Les Biberons Bâtis qui était le projet de Bruno Tanguay, aussi connu sous le nom Satan Bélanger. Avant Les Biberons Bâtis, Bruno était dans un groupe appelé Turbine Depress, de la musique aussi très singulière. Je pense que tu aimerais beaucoup Les Biberons Bâtis.

Discographie de Tenzier (Jusqu’à maintenant)

  • TNZR001 – Dominic Vanchesteing, Eric Fillion, Alexandre St-Onge – Untitled [Mini CD, 2010]
  • TNZR050 – Étienne O’Leary – Films Et Musiques Originales (1966 – 1968) [LP, 2010]
  • TNZR051 – Le Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec – 1973 [LP, 2011]
  • TNZR052 – Bernard Gagnon – Musique Électronique (1975-1983) [LP, 2012]
  • TNZR053 – Gisèle Ricard – Électroacoustique (1980-1987) [LP, 2013]

Imprint :: Amok Recordings

Amok_Recordings-weirdcanada_photo-web.jpg

The sonorous expanse that is Toronto’s artistic vestibule is speckled with independent start-up labels, each orbiting uniquely around the city’s cache of raw talent. In this voluminous climate, Justin Scott Gray, founder of Amok Recordings, is attuned to the ‘global character’ of Canada’s do-it-yourself and do-it-together musical landscape.

Creative collaboration between projects emerges as a new language, the semiotics of which —- given the prominence of talent and people motivated in providing it with a collective roof —- speak to the ever loudening typologies that strengthen the presence of our northernly crucibles. It is here, in this space of global cross-pollination, that Amok Recordings has established itself as a progenitor of music that navigates across borders, both geographically and stylistically speaking. We spoke to the founder of the Toronto via Elliot Lake experimental label about Amok’s birth, evolution and ongoing communication.

Bleepus Chris – Stalker

Jay Morritt – Love You More Than I Miss You

Justin Scott Gray – Octatactics

RCL Commission – Been Out In The Field Too Long

 

Joshua Robinson: How did Amok start? What was the creative push behind the inception of the imprint? Did it begin as a way for you to share your own music?

Justin Scott Gray: Amok “officially” began in June 2006. However, the imprint name dates back to around 2000 (appearing on various CD-r releases but without a real organization behind it). When Amok was first conceived, it aimed to serve several purposes:

  1. to create a free online archive for limited edition and out-of-print releases
  2. to present digital music in a way that felt like it was part of the overall package (as opposed to just some text on archive.org)
  3. to invite other like-minded artists from around the world to present their work in a similar way
  4. to become more of an arts-collective rather than a label (note: there used to be a ‘visual arts’ section on the website and we would showcase portfolios)

As you grow, your inspiration obviously changes… For the last few years we have been focusing more on new releases and selling physical packages, rather than just archiving old material via free download. I guess the short answer to your question is yes – it began partly as a way to present the music that I was involved in.

You recently returned to Toronto from Elliot Lake, Ontario. Can you comment on how these geographic spaces influenced you differently?

<<< read more >>>

Elliot Lake is a pretty depressing place… It began as a booming uranium mine town. Then, in the early ’90s, all of the mining companies closed. With a crippled economy, the city council moved quickly to create a for-profit company (comprised of the mayor and most of the councillors) and they re-branded the city after their new company name: “Retirement Living”. They inherited tons of liquidated cottage-homes from the former mine companies and started busing-in pensioners to fill the homes and pay the taxes.

So in comparison with Toronto (where there are actually people under the age of 65), it’s a lot different! As far as the influence goes… The lack of culture really made me want to create something.

Micro-independents and DIY labels seem to be incredibly prevalent, especially in the major hubs such as Toronto, which is home to Amok. Can you comment on what it is about the creative ethos of Toronto that makes it such a hot-spot for labels and musicians alike?

Yeah – Bandcamp alone seems to have spawned hundreds of new labels. Not being facetious but it’s probably just the sheer density of people that makes Toronto a “hot-spot”… I think that with the way technology has evolved, pretty much anyone, anywhere, can make a label. You really don’t have to be in a big city to do it! There’s just more people there doing it.

Your releases seem to cover the spectrum of physical mediums quite well. However, there seems to be a bit of a preference for cassette. What does the cassette medium mean to you?

Well, it is an analog format and every release that we put out has a digital counterpart… Personally, I like comparing the sound of the digital vs. the analog… I also like that it has two sides because this can really influence the way an artist works. I know that when I was making my last solo record Adult Music I really focused on the two-side format. I’ve also read articles about what it means to some other people. A few have noted that cassette culture is a “rebellion in the face of the iPhone generation,” while others chalk it up to plain nostalgia. It’s probably a bit of everything. I would release music on all formats, if I could afford it.

Stylistically, your catalogue and the musicians who you have worked with are incredibly diverse. Is the strength of the electronic, ambient, and experimental communities in Toronto a reason for the prevalence of the genres on your imprint?

To be honest, I have no idea what’s been going in Toronto… Like I said, I’ve been in Elliot Lake for the past few months and before that I was in Sarnia (which is as equally depressing as Elliot Lake). Also, we don’t have any other Toronto artists involved with the label (except JEFFTHEWORLD, but he makes chiptune and that’s a whole culture unto itself). The label catalogue is pretty much just music that I personally find interesting and that I think would fit together in some strange way. I don’t really focus on any given geographic location and I tend to work with people that I just think are genuine.

Collaboration between artists under the Amok imprint seems to be a pretty important point of distinction for your label. Why is cross-pollination between creative projects important to you?

I think that when someone is being genuine they are likely just “doing-what-they-do”, and so if you set up a network of people who “do-music” then it just makes sense that collaborations will happen… I have always found it interesting how a specific artist can act like an ingredient in a new recipe. And, as a fan, I’ve always enjoyed dissecting music and imagining what a particular artist might be adding to any given project (it becomes even more interesting once you know a particular artist’s body of work).

There is some branching out of Amok to work with musicians residing beyond Canada. Can you comment on how this ‘global’ character might distinguish Amok from other Toronto-based imprints? What international communities have you been able to develop working relationships with?

It’s funny because I know that Weird Canada has some strict guidelines for only covering Canadian artists, and as we discussed, much of the catalogue is comprised of releases by artists from other countries… Dare I say that this aspect of Amok is perhaps what makes us even more Canadian than your average label? Melting Pot 101.

Seriously though, I don’t feel connected to any particular city. Yes, we’re Canadian. And yes, we’re currently in Toronto. But that doesn’t matter… We could still be surrounded by the elderly folks of Elliot Lake and the label would continue in the same way. That probably sets us apart from other Toronto labels.

We’ve put out releases by artists from six countries and really created some strong networks in both France (Strasbourg) and the United States (Los Angeles). In France, I have been working with Nicolas Boutines who has brought us several amazing projects including his own collaborations with Pascal Gully (who has released music on John Zorn’s Tzadik label). In LA, I have been working with Jean-Paul Garnier. He is an extremely hard-working and very talented sound artist who has connected us with many other artists and organizations within the U.S. He’s even released the work of some Amok artists on his Welcome To The 21st net label.

Canada is a bellowing breeding ground for DIY and independent musicians and record imprints. What is it about the creative climate of Canada that inspires and facilitates this sort of artistic fervour?

I’m not sure what it is. If we’re talking specifically about “the industry“ then maybe it’s because of how spoiled we are as Canadians. A LOT of releases seem to have FACTOR or various Arts Council logos on them. There’s so much incentive for young people to ”take a couple of years off of school, start an indie band and hit the road for a while.” I’m a little jealous because we have had zero funding and it’s been an uphill battle.

One final question: Do you have any upcoming releases that you are particularly excited about?

I’m still pretty excited about the Ross Chait album that we just put out. As for upcoming releases, we’re getting ready to put out a new Somnaphon tape/CD and I’m really thrilled that he’s going to be a part of the label. His work is VERY interesting. FYI: he also runs his own label, Bicephalic Records, which is definitely worth checking out!

Amok Recordings Discography (to-date):

2013

Ross Wallace Chait – Routine Symptoms
Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 3
the One (family) – the One (family)
Ross Wallace Chait & loopool – Digressive Generation
Debbie Gaines – HORTUS (rappel libre!)
b.burroughs – Paraded And Thus; My Hair Has Held All The Smells Of Your Body
Canti – Gale Warning For Lake Superior EP
the One (family) – Live @ SOMETHINGseries

2012

mic&rob – Archi Cons (suite)
Justin Scott Gray – All In Time
Cathartech – Disquietudes
USB Orchestra – Phase One (2005-2009)
b.burroughs – *sniper function(bodily)
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 2
Justin Scott Gray – My New Synth
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass The Bugs And The Breeze
Justin Scott Gray – Segue Heil
Debbie Gaines – Mirror, Mirror
loopool – Wears A Golden Hat
Jay Morritt – No Good Times
mic&rob – Live And Let Lie
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume III
JEFFTHEWORLD – Disc+
EKT – EKT

2011

Chevalier – Heart and Soul (Ambient Communications Vol. 2)
Justin Scott Gray – In Audible
loopool – *Looks To Feudalism: the One (family) – C.$’ta
the One (family) – Sprout_Tiers
b.burroughs – bayis, sweet…

2010

NILL – Meeba
Rion C – Live In The Chemical Valley
t h i e f – Expedition
Chevalier – O.S. V1: Ambient Communications
t h i e f – REC.
This Is Esophagus – Love, What Is

2009

James Provencher – Bird Calls Home In Time For Christmas
This Is Esophagus – Terra Firma EP
Brother’s Pus – A Mirror To Fool An Audience For A Play An Audience To Fool A Mirror For A Play
James Provencher – AM Radio
James Provencher – Five Miles To God’s Country
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume II
USB Orchestra – Slaves
James Provencher – Poverty-Line Assault
P*Taz – Ituri EP

2008

USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume I
Bad Bolster Boycott – Margarita EP
Lights Streaming Through The Sounds – Sunrise EP
USB Orchestra – I am ok
Polymath – Polymath EP

2006

Dead Seed Recordings – From Our Heart Will Flow Rivers Of Living Water
USB Orchestra – Pentuhtook
A-Mo & Amplifier Machine – Y’all Fatties Come Chew Some Freedom!
RCL Commission – RCL Commission
Bleepus Christ – Nature
Bleepus Christ – Merry Christmas, Jesus Christ
USB Orchestra – Be Free.
Bleepus Christ – Listen-In Amplifier
Bleepus Christ – bye, mean.

L’immensité sonore qu’est le vestibule artistique de Toronto est parsemée d’étiquettes indépendantes toutes neuves, chacune orbitant de manière unique autour de la ville bouillant de talent. Plongé dans ce volumineux climat, Justin Scott Gray, le fondateur d’Amok Recordings, est accoutumé à la disposition générale pour le fait-maison et le travail d’équipe harmonieux qui régit le paysage musical canadien.

De la collaboration créative entre projets émerge un nouveau langage, une sémantique qui – étant donné l’afflux de talents et de gens motivés à offrir un toit collectif – parle aux typologies de plus en plus présentes, celles qui renforcent la présence de nos creusets nordiques. C’est ici, au centre de cet espace de pollinisation croisée, qu’Amok Recordings s’est établi comme progéniteur de musique qui navigue au-delà des frontières, autant géographiques que stylistiques. Nous avons parlé avec le fondateur de l’étiquette expérimentale, en provenance de Toronto via Elliot Lake, de sa naissance, de son évolution et de sa constante communication.

Bleepus Chris – Stalker

Jay Morritt – Love You More Than I Miss You

Justin Scott Gray – Octatactics

RCL Commission – Been Out In The Field Too Long

 

Joshua Robinson: Comment Amok a-t-il démarré? Quelle était la poussée créative derrière la mise en place de l’étiquette? Est-ce que cela a commencé comme une façon de partager ta propre musique?

Justin Scott Gray: Amok a démarré ‘’officiellement’’ en juin 2006. Par contre, le nom de l’étiquette date plutôt de 2000 (il apparait sur différentes publications de CD-r sans réelle organisation derrière lui). Quand Amok à démarré, c’était dans le but de servir plusieurs objectifs:

  1. Créer une archive en ligne pour les éditions limitées et les sorties en rupture de stock
  2. Présenter la musique en format digital de manière à ce qu’elle semble faire partie de l’ensemble (et non comme seulement du texte sur archive.org)
  3. Inviter des artistes aux points de vues/intérêtes similaires à partager leur travail selon un canevas similaire
  4. Devenir un collectif artistique plutôt qu’une étiquette (note: Auparavant, il y avait une section ‘Arts visuels’ sur le site où nous partagions des portfolios.)

En grandissant, l’inspiration change… Au cours des dernières années, nous nous sommes concentré de plus en plus sur les nouvelles sorties et les paquets physiques à vendre au lieu de seulement alimenter nos archives avec des téléchargements gratuits. Je pense que la réponse courte à la question est oui – cela à commencé en partie comme une façon de partager mes propres projets.

Tu es récemment revenu à Toronto après avoir habité à Elliot Lake, en Ontario. Peux-tu partager de quelles manières ces espaces géographiques t’ont influencé?

Elliot Lake est un endroit assez déprimant… Ça s’est développé au départ avec les mines d’uranium. Pendant les années 90, toutes les compagnies minières ont plié bagage. Avec une économie précaire, la Ville s’est adapté et a créé un organisme à but lucratif (composé principalement du maire et de ses conseillés) et ils ont ensuite présenté la ville à l’aide de leur nouveau nom d’organisme: ‘Retirement Living’. Ils avaient hérité d’une tonne de maisons-chalets à bas prix des compagnies minières et ils ont commencé à convoyer plein de retraités dans ces maisons pour qu’elles soient habitées et rapportent des taxes.

<<< read more >>>

Alors, en comparaison avec Toronto (où il y a effectivement des gens de moins de 65 ans qui habitent), c’est vraiment différent! Puis, en ce qui concerne l’influence du lieu… l’absence de culture m’a vraiment donné envie de créer quelque chose.

Les mini-étiquettes indépendantes et fait-maison semblent incroyablement présentes, surtout dans les grands centres comme Toronto, d’où vient Amok. Peux-tu partager ce qui dans l’éthos créatif de Toronto rend les étiquettes et les artistes si prolifiques?

Oui – Bandcamp semble à lui seul avoir frayé le chemin à une centaine d’étiquettes. Sans être facétieux, c’est probablement la densité de population qui fait de Toronto un point si ‘chaud’. Je pense qu’avec la manière dont la technologie a évolué, pratiquement n’importe qui n’importe où peut démarrer une étiquette. Vous n’avez pas besoin d’être dans une grande ville pour le faire! Il y a seulement plus de gens qui le font dans ces endroits-là.

Tes sorties semblent couvrir très bien le large spèctre des copies physiques. Par contre, il semble y avoir une préférence pour la cassette. Qu’est ce que la cassette représente pour toi?

Eh bien, c’est un format analogique et chaque sortie que nous faisons a son équvalent numérique. Personnellement, j’aime comparer le son du numérique et de l’analogique… J’aime aussi le fait que la cassette a deux faces parce que ça peut grandement influencer la manière de travailler de l’artiste. Je sais que pendant que je travaillais sur mon dernier album solo Adult Music, je me suis vraiment concentré sur le format deux-faces. J’ai aussi lu des articles pour savoir quelle importance ce format a pour d’autres gens. Quelques personnes semblent penser que le culture de la cassette est une “rébellion contre la génération iPhone”, alors que d’autres l’associent à de la simple nostalgie. C’est probablement un peu de tout. Je sortirais de la musique sous tous les formats, si je pouvais me le permettre.

Le catalogue et les artistes avec lesquels tu choisis de travailler ont un style très diversifié. Est-ce que la force des scènes électronique, ambiante et expérimentale de Toronto sont responsables de leur abondance sur ton étiquette?

Pour être honnête, je n’ai aucune idée de ce qui se passe à Toronto…. Comme je le disais, j’ai passé les derniers mois à Elliot Lake et juste avant j’étais à Sarnia (qui est aussi déprimant qu’Elliot Lake). Aussi, nous n’avons pas d’autres artistes de Toronto qui font partie de l’étiquette (sauf JEFFTHEWORLD, mais il fait du chiptune et c’est vraiment une culture en soi). Le catalogue de l’étiquette est pas mal juste de la musique que je trouve intéressante et qui, je crois, peut former un tout cohérent, d’une certaine façon. Je ne pense pas beaucoup aux origines géographiques des artistes et je m’entoure en général de gens qui me semblent authentiques.

Les collaborations entre artistes d’Amok Recordings semblent être un élèment distinctif important pour l’étiquette. Pourquoi la pollinisation croisée entre projets créatifs est-elle si importante pour toi?

Je pense que quand les gens sont authentiques, ils font d’emblée “ce-qu’ils-ont-à-faire”, alors si on connecte ensemble une bande de gens qui font de la musique, les collaborations naissent d’elles-mêmes. J’ai toujours trouvé intéressant qu’un artiste en particulier puisse être l’ingrédient d’une nouvelle recette. Et, en tant que fan, j’ai toujours aimé disséquer la musique et imaginer ce qu’un artiste en particulier pourrait apporter à un projet (ça devient encore plus intéressant quand tu connais bien l’ensemble de l’oeuvre d’un artiste).

Il y a une ouverture chez Amok à travailler avec des musiciens résidant ailleurs qu’au Canada. Peux-tu nous dire comment cette caractéristque ‘globale’ pourrait permettre à Amok de se distinguer des autres étiquettes de Toronto? Avec quelles communautés internationales as-tu développé des liens?

C’est drôle parce que je sais à quel point c’est une ligne directrice importante de Weird Canada que de couvrir seulement du contenu canadien et, comme nous en avons discuté, une bonne partie du catalogue comprend des sorties d’artistes d’autres pays. Est-ce que je peux me permettre de dire que cet aspect d’Amok est peut-être ce qui nous rend encore plus canadien? Melting pop 101.

Sérieusement, je ne me sais pas connecté à une ville en particulier. Oui, nous sommes canadiens. Et oui, nous sommes présentement basés à Toronto. Mais ça n’a pas d’importance. Nous pourrions être entourés des aînés d’Elliot Lake et l’étiquette se comporterait de la même manière. C’est probablement ce qui nous différencie des autres étiquettes de Toronto.

Nous avons produit les albums d’artistes de six pays différents et avons créé des réseaux importants en France (Strasbourg) et aux États-Unis (Los Angeles). En France, j’ai travaillé avec Nicolas Boutines, qui nous a apporté plusieurs projets étonnants, incluant une de ses propres collaborations avec Pascal Gully (qui a sortie de la musique sur l’étiquette Tzadik de John Zorn). À Los Angeles, j’ai travaillé avec Jean-Paul Garnier. C’est un artiste du son qui travaille extrêmement fort, qui est bourré de talent, et qui a connecté avec plusieurs artistes et organisations aux États-Unis. Il a même publié le travail de quelques-uns des artistes d’Amok sur son label web, Welcome to the 21st.

Le Canada est le terrain d’un nombre incroyable de musiciens indépendants et d’étiquettes fait-maison. Qu’est-ce qui, dans ce climat créatif canadien, favorise et inspire si bien cette genre de ferveur artistique?

Je ne suis pas certain. Si nous parlons principalement de “l’industrie”, c’est peut-être parce que nous sommes si gâtés au Canada. BEAUCOUP d’albums semblent porter le logo de FACTOR ou du Conseil des Arts. Les jeunes sont tellement incités à ‘’prendre une année sabbatique ou deux, à créer un groupe de musique et à partir en tournée un temps”. Je suis un peu jaloux parce que nous n’avons eu aucun financement et que ça a été une longue bataille.

Une dernière question: Y a-t-il une publication prochaine qui t’excites particulièrement?

Je suis encore très excité par l’album de Ross Chait qu’on vient de sortir. Pour les publications à venir, nous sommes en train de préparer la sortie d’un nouveau Somnaphon en format cassette/CD et je suis très content qu’il fasse partie de notre étiquette. Son travail est VRAIMENT intéressant. Pour votre info: Il a aussi sa propre étiquette, Bicephalic Records, qui vaut vraiment le détour!

La discographie d’Amok Recordings (à ce jour)

2013

Ross Wallace Chait – Routine Symptoms
Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 3
the One (family) – the One (family)
Ross Wallace Chait & loopool – Digressive Generation
Debbie Gaines – HORTUS (rappel libre!)
b.burroughs – Paraded And Thus; My Hair Has Held All The Smells Of Your Body
Canti – Gale Warning For Lake Superior EP
the One (family) – Live @ SOMETHINGseries

2012

mic&rob – Archi Cons (suite)
Justin Scott Gray – All In Time
Cathartech – Disquietudes
USB Orchestra – Phase One (2005-2009)
b.burroughs – *sniper function(bodily)
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 2
Justin Scott Gray – My New Synth
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass The Bugs And The Breeze
Justin Scott Gray – Segue Heil
Debbie Gaines – Mirror, Mirror
loopool – Wears A Golden Hat
Jay Morritt – No Good Times
mic&rob – Live And Let Lie
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume III
JEFFTHEWORLD – Disc+
EKT – EKT

2011

Chevalier – Heart and Soul (Ambient Communications Vol. 2)
Justin Scott Gray – In Audible
loopool – *Looks To Feudalism: the One (family) – C.$’ta
the One (family) – Sprout_Tiers
b.burroughs – bayis, sweet…

2010

NILL – Meeba
Rion C – Live In The Chemical Valley
t h i e f – Expedition
Chevalier – O.S. V1: Ambient Communications
t h i e f – REC.
This Is Esophagus – Love, What Is

2009

James Provencher – Bird Calls Home In Time For Christmas
This Is Esophagus – Terra Firma EP
Brother’s Pus – A Mirror To Fool An Audience For A Play An Audience To Fool A Mirror For A Play
James Provencher – AM Radio
James Provencher – Five Miles To God’s Country
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume II
USB Orchestra – Slaves
James Provencher – Poverty-Line Assault
P*Taz – Ituri EP

2008

USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume I
Bad Bolster Boycott – Margarita EP
Lights Streaming Through The Sounds – Sunrise EP
USB Orchestra – I am ok
Polymath – Polymath EP

2006

Dead Seed Recordings – From Our Heart Will Flow Rivers Of Living Water
USB Orchestra – Pentuhtook
A-Mo & Amplifier Machine – Y’all Fatties Come Chew Some Freedom!
RCL Commission – RCL Commission
Bleepus Christ – Nature
Bleepus Christ – Merry Christmas, Jesus Christ
USB Orchestra – Be Free.
Bleepus Christ – Listen-In Amplifier
Bleepus Christ – bye, mean.

Imprint :: Kingfisher Bluez

Imprint :: Kingfisher Bluez

If there is anyone who can testify to the vibrancy of Vancouver’s music scene, it is surely Tim Clapp (a.k.a. Tim the Mute). Since 2008, he’s released 33 records from his one-man label, Kingfisher Bluez. Those releases have been exclusively on vinyl — generally 7-inches — and mostly made up of local artists. The sounds of the KFB discography range from the sweet-sounding melodies of The Albertans to the haunted croons of Dirty Beaches and the power-punk of the B-Lines. With another release appearing every time I go to the record store, it’s hard to keep up with Kingfisher Bluez’s prolific blast of activity. Thankfully, Tim was nice enough to tell us how he does it.

The Albertans – Jason

Tim the Mute – Song

Village – Claustro

Kyle Valade: Does Kingfisher Bluez sell out of a lot of pressings?

Tim Clapp: No, not really. If mean, if I wanted to sell out of records, I’d just press 200 or whatever. The goal is to have the records, you know what I mean? I don’t want to sell out of records. It’s nice to sell records, but if I’m going to sell a thousand records I’ll print 2,000. If I’m going to sell 200 records I’ll print 300-400. I usually do 300 of my 7-inches and 500 of my LPs. The idea is that I’m building a label that I want to be running for the rest of my life. So I want to have enough records so that I don’t have to repress them.

I am sold out of that Xiu Xiu record I did. I’ve got like maybe 10 copies left, so I’ve just sort of hoarded them, really. I usually stash like five copies of every record I do, so when it gets down to 10 copies, I tell my distributor it’s sold out.

How did you get the idea to do a singles club?

I just thought “I wonder if there’s a project I could to do to show my love of the city?” I looked at compilations like the Vancouver Complication, the Vancouver Independent and the Emergency Room comp. These are compilations that mean a lot to the people that were in those scenes, you know what I mean, like Emergency Room is these old fogeys that are like 30 years old now or whatever. And Vancouver Complication, I don’t know when that was, like 1980 or something [Ed’s Note: 1979]. But you look at these records and you just think “It’s so cool that there’s a document of that scene”, you know what I mean, and there’s always at least one band that just snuck on there. And that could be your new favourite band. So I thought, I want to do a compilation of all my favourite bands in Vancouver. I could just do a record, like a compilation record, but I thought “I want to do something big”, you know? “I want to do a singles club and just have one song from each band” or whatever. So I chose the most expensive way to do it.

People were sayin’ “you should do splits” or whatever. And I fuckin’ hate splits. Like, how do you file a split? You just think “Oh, what band do I put this under?” The worst is when you have two covers and you don’t know what one to face.

<<< read more >>>

The better band?

Yeah, but then you’re telling the other band that they don’t sound good enough. You want to listen to the other record and you don’t know where to find it. So I thought I’d just make one-sided records so each of the singles club records is one side, one song, or whatever. And the other side’s just blank. It costs the same amount as pressing two sides. But I thought it’s better, you know? Each band deserves their own cover, their own side. I’d always rather press a single-sided record than a split.

The singles club is 80 bucks. You get 15 records. Well, it’s 12 records and then three bonus records. If you sign up now — the bonus records are for people that are signed up at the time — so there’s still one more bonus record. But really I’ve been chuckin’ in the other records if I have a couple left. The first bonus record was Zen Mystery Fogg.

Tim Clapp (Kingfisher Bluez)

A lot of the artists you’ve released are from Vancouver. How do you choose them?

It’s a lot of my friends’ bands. I want to put out records by people that I really like. Music is available all the time, so I want to curate a really specific selection. I feel like people are going to remember Kingfisher Bluez as a Vancouver label, so I want to put out a lot of Vancouver bands, or whatever. And it sort of helps me give back to the community. I’ve been enjoying Vancouver music for so long. It’s nice to be able to help out these bands in any way I can, even if it’s just a little bit.

What made you decide to start the label?

I started the label in 2008 as a blog where I would post my friends’ songs — like mp3s or whatever. In 2011, I was just feelin’ a bit depressed and I thought “I should just kill myself, my life is so shitty.” And I thought if I’m gonna do that I might as well just sell all my shit and then start that record label I’ve always wanted to do, you know what I mean? Cuz what’s the point? “I’m so sad”, or whatever. I’ve got so many fuckin’ records and books and amps and stuff, I should just sell off this shit and have enough money to do all the things that I want to do — just give it a shot. I thought “What’s stopping me from doing this?” What do I really need this shit for? The records of myself, Tim the Mute, will only cost me like a thousand bucks to make, so I’ll just sell a thousand bucks worth of my shit. So I thought fuck it. Let’s just do it. I mean, I guess people just go through weird periods of their life where they just think “What am I doin’?” Especially when they’re 23. So I thought, “I’ll just do it.”

Do you do all of the work for the label yourself?

Yeah, I do everything myself. Except for a lot of the design — that’s Ryan from Hockey Dad Records. The artists will choose images and then I’ll vet them or whatever. All these records have sort of trees or outdoor stuff. I want to show a lot of what we see in our normal lives: Instagram photos, that sort of chillwave, hazy, summery stuff. I feel like that represents the current musical climate well. So I want something that looks like 2013. I want it to look like the records came out in 2013.

I try not to pick out stuff that looks tacky. I hate black and white collage. A lot of bands are doing it — it’s sort of retro. I want something that’s new. I don’t use photos of dead animals or mangled limbs or dicks or anything like that. I don’t want some grotesque drawing. I want everything to look really nice. And it’s not because I want them to be easy to look at. I just want them to be nice looking, beautiful records. That’s important to me. I just don’t want to release anything that’s mean-spirited.

Would you recommend starting a label?

Not as a business, I wouldn’t recommend that. But I think it’s great that more labels are starting up. It’s a great community. A lot of people I know have record labels — I know people because they have record labels. We all hang out and talk shop and stuff. And it’s fun, you know? We all compare. We all think we’re givin’ a better rate than the next guy. We’re really tryin’ to make the best stuff. And no one does it to make money. There’s part of you that wants to curate this great selection of records. I wouldn’t recommend that anyone does it to make money, but I would recommend that everyone just put out a record and start a label or whatever. Why not? It’s as easy as doing it. As long you have a credit card you can do it. Just make a great collection of music.

Do you have any regrets?

No, but If I put out a band’s record, I don’t want them to break up right after. It’s a little annoying. So usually I won’t do a record for a band that has no other records. I want there to be a Discogs page for the band. I want there to be a history of the band. A band like Village with no records out is okay. I was there at the beginning of that band, so when they wanted to do a record, I thought that those guys were in for the long haul. And now I’m doing their second record, and hopefully doing their LP next year. And I hope they get signed to a bigger label than me.

Do you have any favorite records that you’ve released?

Oh yeah. I mean, anything where I get to play with the physicality of the medium. Like the record where you hear the sound of yourself turning it over. It’s a bit wanky or whatever, but it’s fun to do stuff like that. On my new record, Song, I say [singing] “I made this record for a girl / I put my number in the run-out groove / So call me if you think it’s you.” And my phone number is in the run-out groove for that record. If you hold the record up you can see my phone number written out. So anything where I get to play with that, you know? There’s no way to get that unless you have one of 300 physical records, which is cool.

All of my records have little messages etched into them. The Zen Mystery Fogg record says “Everytime I listen to music I think I’m a bride.” That line is from Nightwood by Djuna Barnes. I use a lot of books — a lot of weird queer lit and sort of alternative classic books. It’s nice. It’s fun. I get to reference my favourite books, my favourite songs, and stuff. Sometimes I just make them up, and sometimes I take something out of a song or whatever. All of my records also have a B-side message on the label as well. The Eeek record says “Something inside so strong.” The Zen Mystery Fogg record says “Everything is meaningful right now.” I just put these sweet little earnest messages on the label. As a record collector and a curator you’re really hyper-aware. You want to reference things, and you want to have your spot in record history.

What do you think is the role of the record label?

Like I was saying before, in an age where all music is available on demand, the role of the record label is curation. There are labels that I will buy literally everything they put out without even listening to it, because I know it’s gonna be good. Because I trust the people that run them. Labels like Shelflife, Mississippi or Neon Gold — I buy everything those guys put out. I want people to buy KFB releases knowing that I’ve chosen these records, and the way they’re designed, like the white border around the 7-inches. I want people to see the way I’ve curated the label to be my favourite stuff without bias towards genre or any of that stuff. And all that. I’m really happy with it. I just put out stuff that I like and I don’t worry about it.

KFB is a project made through sampling other music and making a bigger thing out of it. This is the one thing that I’m doing. I’m taking all of musical history and everything that songs and records and images stand for and making one thing out of all of it. It’s a powerful tool, you know what I mean? The record label lets you say so much with just one thing.

Kingfisher Bluez Discography (To Date)

7"s:

  • KFB001 – Sebastian Fleet + Count Oak – Sun 7"
  • KFB002 – Teen Plaque – Teen Plaque Text Message / Fuck The Revolution!!!
  • KFB003 – Tim The Mute – Anything You Want
  • KFB004 – Eeek! – Potential
  • KFB005 – The Shiny Diamonds – Such A Sucker
  • KFB006 – Village – Nowhere
  • KFB007 – Zen Mystery Fogg – Raccoon
  • KFB008 – Xiu Xiu – Quagga
  • KFB009 – Tim The Mute / Old Phoebe – Kingfisher Bluez Christmas Single 2012
  • KFB010 – White Poppy – Mirage Man
  • KFB011 – Dirty Beaches – Elizabeth’s Theme
  • KFB012 – Apollo Ghosts – Night Witch
  • KFB013 – Capitol 6 – No One Came
  • KFB014 – B-Lines – Tell Me
  • KFB015 – Dead Ghosts – 1000 Joints
  • KFB016 – Student Teacher – Left For Dead
  • KFB017 – Korean Gut – Lava Flow
  • KFB018 – Rose Melberg – Distant Ships
  • KFB019 – Love Cuts – Back To You
  • KFB020 – Wee’d – I Think I Just Wee’d Myself
  • KFB021 – Needles//Pins – Polaroid
  • KFB022 – Jungle Green – The One I Love
  • KFB023 – Tim The Mute – Song
  • KFB024 – The Albertans – Casual Encounters
  • KFB025 – Standard Fare – Rumours
  • KFB026 – Reverter – No More Haircuts
  • KFB027 – Village – Stranger Thoughts
  • KFB028 – Let’s Talk About Space – Luna Oscillators
  • KFB029 – Laura Veirs – July Flame
  • KFB030 – Rose Melberg and Gregory Webster – Kingfisher Bluez Christmas Single 2013
  • KFB031 – Nice Try – Convinced
  • KFB032 – Tim The Mute – Doctor Who Cosplay
  • KFB033 – Mesa Luna – Shutting Down
  • KFB034 – The Stevens – The EP
  • KFB035 – The Passenger – jxpg

LPs:

  • KFB6001 – Eeek! – Move Real Slow
  • KFB6002 – OK Vancouver OK – Food. Shelter. Water.
  • KFB6003 – The Albertans – Dangerous Anything
  • KFB6004 – Adam Stafford – Imaginary Walls Collapse
  • KFB6005 – Bad Channels – Bad Channels

S’il y a quelqu’un qui peut témoigner du dynamisme de la scène musicale de Vancouver, c’est bien Tim Clapp (plus connu sous le nom Tim the Mute). Depuis 2008, il a sorti 33 disques sur le label qu’il gère seul, Kingfisher Bluez. Ces disques sont sortis exclusivement sur vinyle – généralement des 7 pouces – et sont la plupart du temps l’œuvre d’artistes locaux. Les sons de la discographie de KFB sont très variés : cela va des douces mélodies de The Albertans aux fredonnements hantés de Dirty Beaches en passant par le power-punk de B-Lines. Comme à chaque fois que je vais chez le disquaire, on dirait qu’un nouveau disque est sorti, difficile de suivre le rythme prolifique de Kingfisher Bluez. Heureusement, Tim a eu la gentillesse de nous expliquer comment il fait.

The Albertans – Jason

Tim the Mute – Song

Village – Claustro

Kyle Valade : Est-ce que beaucoup de disques sortis chez Kingfisher Bluez sont épuisés?

Tim Clapp : Non, pas vraiment. Ceci dit, si je voulais que des disques soient épuisés, j’en tirerais 200 exemplaires ou quelque chose du genre. Le but, c’est de sortir les disques, tu vois ce que je veux dire? Ce n’est pas qu’ils soient en rupture de stock. C’est bien de vendre des disques mais si je dois en vendre un millier, je vais en tirer 2 000 exemplaires. Si je dois en vendre 200, je vais en tirer 300 ou 400. En général je tire les 7 pouces à 300 exemplaires et les LP à 500. L’idée est de bâtir un label qui fonctionne pour le reste de ma vie. Alors je veux disposer de suffisamment de disques pour ne pas avoir à faire de retirage.

Ce disque de Xiu Xiu que j’ai sorti, il est en rupture de stock. Il me reste peut-être 10 exemplaires alors j’en ai fait des provisions, vraiment. En général je garde cinq exemplaires de chaque disque que je sors, alors quand on arrive au seuil de 10 exemplaires, je dis à mon distributeur que le disque est en rupture de stock.

Comment t’est venue l’idée de faire une collection de singles?

Je me suis juste dit « Je me demande s’il y a un projet que je pourrais faire pour montrer à quel point j’aime cette ville ». J’ai regardé les compilations comme Vancouver Complication, Vancouver Independent et the Emergency Room comp. Ce sont des compilations qui sont très importantes pour les personnes qui étaient sur ces scènes, Emergency Room par exemple, des types qui doivent bien avoir 30 ans aujourd’hui. Et Vancouver Complication, je ne sais pas de quand ça date, 1980 ou quelque chose dans le genre [Note de la rédaction : 1979]. Mais tu regardes ces enregistrements et tu te dis : « C’est tellement cool qu’il reste une trace de cette scène », et il y a toujours eu au moins un groupe qui s’est démarqué. Et ça pourrait très bien être ton nouveau groupe préféré. Alors je me suis dit que je voulais réunir tous mes groupes de Vancouver préférés. J’aurais pu tout simplement faire un disque, comme une compilation, mais je me suis dit : « Je veux faire un gros coup, je veux faire une collection de singles, avec juste une chanson pour chaque groupe ». J’ai donc choisi le moyen le plus cher de le faire.

Les gens me disaient : « tu devrais faire des split-disque ». Et moi je déteste les splits. Comment tu fais par exemple pour ranger un split? Tu dois te demander « Ah, à quel groupe est-ce que je mets ça? » Le pire, c’est quand tu as deux couvertures et que tu ne sais pas quoi mettre en évidence.

<<< read more >>>

Le meilleur groupe?

Ouais, mais après tu dois dire à l’autre groupe que leur son n’est pas assez bon. Tu veux écouter l’autre disque mais tu ne sais pas où le trouver. Alors je me suis dit que je sortirais des disques d’une face pour que chaque disque de la collection de singles ne comporte qu’une seule face ou une seule chanson. Et l’autre face est vierge. Ça coûte le même prix que de faire imprimer deux faces. Mais j’ai trouvé que c’était mieux. Chaque groupe mérite d’avoir sa propre couverture, sa face pour lui tout seul. Je préférerai toujours sortir un disque à une seule face plutôt qu’un split.

La collection de singles coûte 80 dollars. Pour ce prix-là tu as 15 disques. Enfin, 12 disques et ensuite trois disques bonus. Si tu t’inscris maintenant – les disques bonus sont pour les personnes qui s’étaient inscrites – il reste encore un disque bonus. Mais vraiment, j’en ai mis des deux autres quand j’en avait en rabe. Le premier disque bonus était Zen Mystery Fogg.

Beaucoup des artistes qui sont sortis sur ton label sont de Vancouver. Comment tu les choisis?

Ce sont souvent les groupes de mes amis. Je veux sortir les disques de gens que j’aime vraiment. La musique est disponible en permanence alors je veux documenter une sélection bien spécifique. J’ai le sentiment que les gens vont se souvenir de Kingfisher Bluez comme d’un label de Vancouver alors je veux sortir un maximum de groupes de cette ville. Et puis ça m’aide à redonner à la collectivité. J’apprécie la musique de Vancouver depuis tellement longtemps. C’est bien de pouvoir aider ces groupes comme je peux, même si ce n’est pas grand chose.

Tim Clapp (Kingfisher Bluez)

Qu’est-ce qui t’a décidé à créer le label?

J’ai lancé le label en 2008 sous forme de blogue sur lequel je postais les chansons de mes amis – des mp3 ou autres. En 2011, je me sentais un peu déprimé et je pensais « Je devrais me suicider, ma vie est tellement merdique ». Et je me suis dit que tant qu’à faire ça, autant vendre tout mon bordel et créer ce label que j’ai toujours voulu créer, tu comprends? Quel intérêt de te répéter « Qu’est-ce que je suis triste… ». Je possède tellement de putain de disques, de livres, d’amplis et tout le reste, je n’ai qu’à tout vendre et j’aurai alors assez d’argent pour faire toutes les choses que j’ai envie de faire – il faut juste essayer. Qu’est-ce qui m’en empêchait? À quoi ça me sert tout ce bordel? Pour faire mes propres disques, ceux de Tim the Mute, je n’aurai besoin que d’un millier de dollars, alors je vais juste vendre mes affaires de façon à récupérer 1 000 dollars. Allez! J’imagine que les gens passent par des périodes bizarres où ils se disent : « Qu’est-ce que je fous… ». Surtout à 23 ans. Alors je me suis dit « Vas-y, lance-toi ».

Est-ce que tu fais tout le travail du label toi-même?

Ouais, je fais tout moi-même. Sauf une grosse partie du design – ça c’est Ryan de Hockey Dad Records qui s’en occupe. Les artistes vont choisir des images et je donne mon accord ou pas. Tous ces disques ont des images d’arbres ou des vues en extérieur, ce genre de choses. Je veux montrer un peu ce qu’on voit dans nos vies normales : des photos Instagram, ce style de truc vaporeux, brumeux et estival. J’ai l’impression que cela représente bien le climat musical actuel. Je veux quelque chose qui reflète 2013. Je veux qu’on ait le sentiment que les disques sont sortis en 2013.

J’essaie de ne pas choisir des trucs qui ont l’air démodés. Je déteste les collages noir et blanc. Beaucoup de groupes font ça, c’est un peu rétro. Je veux quelque chose de neuf. Je n’utilise pas de photos d’animaux morts ou de membres estropiés ou de bites ou quoi que ce soit du genre. Je ne veux pas de dessins grotesques. Je veux que tout soit vraiment beau. Et ce n’est parce que je veux que soit facile à regarder. Je veux juste que ce soient de beaux disques. C’est important pour moi. Je ne veux rien sortir qui soit mal intentionné.

Est-ce que tu conseillerais de créer un label?

Pas pour en faire un négoce. Mais je trouve que c’est bien que de nouveaux labels se créent. C’est une communauté géniale. Je connais beaucoup de gens qui ont des maisons de disques – en fait je connais des gens parce qu’ils ont des maisons de disques. On sort tous ensemble et on parle boutique. On compare. On pense tous qu’on a des tarifs plus intéressants que les autres. On essaie sincèrement de faire le meilleur truc possible. Et personne ne le fait pour l’argent. Il y a une partie de toi qui veut inventorier cette belle sélection de disques. Je ne recommanderais à personne de le faire pour gagner de l’argent, par contre je recommande à tout le monde de se lancer et de créer son label. Pourquoi pas? Rien de plus simple. Du moment que tu as une carte de crédit, pas de problème. Vas-y, crée une belle collection de musique.

Des regrets?

Non mais si je sors le disque d’un groupe, je n’ai pas envie que les mecs se séparent juste après. C’est un peu pénible. Alors, en général, je ne vais pas faire le disque d’un groupe qui n’a pas d’autres disques. Je veux qu’il y ait une page Discogs pour le groupe. Je veux que le groupe ait une histoire. Un groupe comme Village qui n’a pas de disque à son actif, ça va. J’étais là au tout début du groupe, alors lorsqu’ils ont voulu faire un disque, j’ai pensé que ces mecs iraient jusqu’au bout. Maintenant je sors leur deuxième disque et peut-être leur album l’année prochaine. Et j’espère qu’ils signeront avec un plus gros label que le mien.

Parmi les disques que tu as sortis, il y en a que tu préfères?

Ah ouais. En fait, tous ceux où je peux vraiment jouer avec l’aspect physique de l’objet en lui-même. Comme le disque où tu entends le bruit que tu fais toi-même en le retournant. Cela ne sert pas à grand chose mais c’est marrant à faire. Sur mon nouveau disque, Song, je dis [il chante] « J’ai fait ce disque pour une fille / J’ai mis mon numéro dans le sillon intérieur / Alors appelle-moi si tu penses que c’est toi ». Et effectivement mon numéro est dans le sillon intérieur sur ce disque. Si tu regardes bien le disque, tu peux voir mon numéro de téléphone écrit. Donc tous les disques où je peux jouer de cette manière, tu vois? Il n’y a pas moyen d’avoir ça sauf si tu as l’un des 300 disques physiques, c’est ça qui est super.

Tous mes disques ont des petits messages gravés dessus. Le disque Zen Mystery Fogg dit : « À chaque fois que j’écoute de la musique je pense que je suis une mariée ». Cette phrase est tirée de Nightwood by Djuna Barnes. J’utilise beaucoup de livres – beaucoup de litté queer étrange et des livres classiques alternatifs. J’aime bien ça. Je fais souvent des références à mes livres préférés, à mes chansons favorites, etc. Parfois je les invente, et parfois je récupère quelque chose dans une chanson ou autre. Tous mes disques ont aussi un message de face B sur l’étiquette aussi. Le disque Eeek dit : « Quelque chose de si fort à l’intérieur ». Le disque Zen Mystery Fogg dit « Tout a un sens en ce moment ». Je mets juste ces petits messages sur l’étiquette. En tant que collectionneur de disques et curateur, tu es forcément très à l’affût de ce type de choses. Tu veux faire référence à de choses et tu veux avoir ta place dans l’histoire du disque.

D’après toi, quel est le rôle d’une maison de disques?

Comme je l’ai déjà dit, à une période où toute la musique est disponible à la demande, le rôle de la maison de disques, c’est la documentation soignée. Il y a certains labels auxquels je vais acheter tout ce qu’ils sortent, sans même écouter la musique, parce que je sais que ce sera bien. Parce que je fais confiance aux gens qui s’en occupent. Des labels comme Shelflife, Mississippi ou Neon Gold — j’achète tout ce que font ces mecs. Je veux que les gens achètent des disques du label KFB en sachant que j’ai choisi ces disques, et la façon dont ils sont conçus, y compris la bordure blanche autour des 7 pouces. Je veux que les gens voient la façon dont j’ai bâti le label pour mettre en avant tout ce que je préfère, sans préjugé vis-à-vis d’un genre ou autre. Je suis vraiment content de ça. Je sors ce qui me plaît et je ne me fais pas de souci. KFB est un projet réalisé grâce à l’échantillonnage d’autres musiques pour en faire un truc plus gros. C’est la chose que je fais. Je prends tout le bagage musical et tout ce que les chansons, les disques et les images représentent et je crée un nouveau produit à partir de tout ça. C’est un outil puissant, tu sais. Avec une maison de disques, tu peux exprimer tellement de choses avec seulement un élément.

Kingfisher Bluez Discography (To Date)

7"s:

  • KFB001 – Sebastian Fleet + Count Oak – Sun 7"
  • KFB002 – Teen Plaque – Teen Plaque Text Message / Fuck The Revolution!!!
  • KFB003 – Tim The Mute – Anything You Want
  • KFB004 – Eeek! – Potential
  • KFB005 – The Shiny Diamonds – Such A Sucker
  • KFB006 – Village – Nowhere
  • KFB007 – Zen Mystery Fogg – Raccoon
  • KFB008 – Xiu Xiu – Quagga
  • KFB009 – Tim The Mute / Old Phoebe – Kingfisher Bluez Christmas Single 2012
  • KFB010 – White Poppy – Mirage Man
  • KFB011 – Dirty Beaches – Elizabeth’s Theme
  • KFB012 – Apollo Ghosts – Night Witch
  • KFB013 – Capitol 6 – No One Came
  • KFB014 – B-Lines – Tell Me
  • KFB015 – Dead Ghosts – 1000 Joints
  • KFB016 – Student Teacher – Left For Dead
  • KFB017 – Korean Gut – Lava Flow
  • KFB018 – Rose Melberg – Distant Ships
  • KFB019 – Love Cuts – Back To You
  • KFB020 – Wee’d – I Think I Just Wee’d Myself
  • KFB021 – Needles//Pins – Polaroid
  • KFB022 – Jungle Green – The One I Love
  • KFB023 – Tim The Mute – Song
  • KFB024 – The Albertans – Casual Encounters
  • KFB025 – Standard Fare – Rumours
  • KFB026 – Reverter – No More Haircuts
  • KFB027 – Village – Stranger Thoughts
  • KFB028 – Let’s Talk About Space – Luna Oscillators
  • KFB029 – Laura Veirs – July Flame
  • KFB030 – Rose Melberg and Gregory Webster – Kingfisher Bluez Christmas Single 2013
  • KFB031 – Nice Try – Convinced
  • KFB032 – Tim The Mute – Doctor Who Cosplay
  • KFB033 – Mesa Luna – Shutting Down
  • KFB034 – The Stevens – The EP
  • KFB035 – The Passenger – jxpg

LPs:

  • KFB6001 – Eeek! – Move Real Slow
  • KFB6002 – OK Vancouver OK – Food. Shelter. Water.
  • KFB6003 – The Albertans – Dangerous Anything
  • KFB6004 – Adam Stafford – Imaginary Walls Collapse
  • KFB6005 – Bad Channels – Bad Channels

Imprint :: Inyrdisk

Inyrdisk-web.jpg

Kevin Hainey looms large in heady Toronto circles — so large that his last name has become a catchphrase/gang chant at live shows when the aktion is heating up. Alongside adventurous forays into music (Disguises, The Pink Noise, Kapali Carsi, etc.), fiction and so much more, he is proprietor of the prolific Inyrdisk, slipping out stacks upon stacks of CD-Rs, 3” CDs and the occasional heavy hitter on wax. Hainey’s katalog is a treasure trove for fans of status quo-challenging sounds, and this interview is long overdue.

DJ Longhorn Grille – Jaunty, Hormonal

Wolfcow – Exsanguination, I Presume

Fossils – Science Tongs

Inyrdisk essentially started with your solo project, Kapali Carsi, right? How did that begin?

Kapali Carsi began with me experimenting and recording alone a little while after Disguises got going. All of a sudden I had hours of music and I didn’t know what I was going to do with it. Some of it I felt strongly about, so I just started releasing it, and that’s how Inyrdisk was born. For the first Kapali Carsi release, I didn’t really want to hassle other dudes to put it out, and didn’t really think it had to come out on cassette. Everyone was doing cassettes at the time, and CD-Rs were easy for me to do from home. I basically just decided to do a small run and not make a big deal out of it.

How long did it take to add more names to the roster?

Women In Tragedy [Bob McCully] was getting prolific with his own CD-Rs to the point of being unable to get them out fast enough to track his evolution, so I thought I would ask him to put something out as well. After that I was standing in 61 Major one day, talking about starting a label, and Andrew Zukerman perked up and was like, “Really? I’ll give you an album to put out.” Being a big fan, I was flattered, and the next thing I knew I had a third release. Then came stuff from Disguises, and Marco Landini, who remains a big supporter, and it went on from there.

Do you feel like you’ve set yourself apart from the pack by releasing CD-Rs?

CD-Rs are a tough sell, and that’s why it has to be a labour of love. People want tapes, especially if they can play them. People are getting rid of CDs right now; they’re really out of fashion. CD-Rs are different from CDs, though, because of the whole handmade aspect. They’re collectible, you get them straight from the group and they’re not mass-produced. Rather than jewel cases, they come in a beautiful hand-printed package that gives it an artist-edition quality. Some people are suspicious of that because they want the big glossy vinyl. It’s not quite a hex, but there are people who say they’re not into CD-Rs at all.

Looking back at your entire catalog, is there one Inyrdisk release that you would consider the furthest out?

That’s tough to say. Sometimes I think it’s my own stuff, or maybe Mama Baer. Some of the harsh noise is pretty far out, and probably alienating to a lot of people. I don’t know though, because it’s all far out. That’s what I want to foster: More people freaking out and not having the fear to do what they feel is appropriate based on their desires or their skill levels. People should feel free to create this kind of music without the thought of making money or making them a star. It’s what I consider to be new, forward-thinking sounds that aren’t necessarily in step with trends, scenes or some flash in the pan. This is a wide spectrum of the underground and people doing weird shit. There’s a need to foster that so it doesn’t get lost, because then all you’ll have is bright lights, big city, bands, bands, eggs, sausage and bands. I love a good band, but only if they’re doing something vital, from the heart and taking it to the next level.

It’s interesting to me how many people run labels in Toronto. Do you feel like each one has its own personal orbit?

Definitely. I think a lot of people have a singular vision in this city, and trouble seeing beyond their own aesthetic preference. I’ve often suggested that all the people who run labels on their own come together. We could call it Postage Blues. But the truth is that people are better at doing different things. If Jacob Horwood was involved, he’d end up being the one screenprinting the covers while other people sat on their computers and got frustrated emailing distros, and other people folded boxes. We’d probably have Greydyn at the front desk.

How did the joke of yelling “Hainey” at shows begin?

That started with Martin Sasseville, who runs Brise-Cul in Montreal. I think we met at an AIDS Wolf or a Pink Noise show, and he started going around to everyone and asking, “Do you know this guy? This is Kevin Hainey!” Before you know it, while some band was playing, he started yelling “Hainey! Hainey!” He was just stoked, and I was kind of weirded out by it. That was the first night I met him, and every time I saw him after that he kept doing the same thing. Other people like Andrew Zukerman, Marco Landini and Deirdre from Pleasence caught onto it, and brought it to Toronto. Brian Seeger and Alex Moskos even brought it to Vancouver. It’s a Canada-wide thing, and good for everyone. Inyrdisk is about doing what I can to support the music that I love. I’m here for the little guy.

Last question: Can you tell me a bit about your new book?

It takes place 80 years from now with a man who used to be a P.I. and is now the head of a peace division. These are men on the street that have resisted the modern conformity of joining camps called the FOLDS. They’ve stayed in cities that have fallen into total anarchy in favour of containment centres, and are trying to bring the reign in future Toronto to a halt. There are a lot of other things going on that they don’t know about, especially with the main character, Clive Dyson. It’s very noir, but also a futuristic, post-dystopian what-have-you. A genre clusterfuck in a desecrated world where one in every 10 buildings has running anything. The meek are scraping together to re-imagine their world into something livable after years of war, pestilence and greed. You follow Clive Dyson as he fights all kinds of spiritual powers, past and future, before the last job. It’s called Nothing Ends Pretty.

Inyrdisk Katalog 2005-2013

All titles released on CD-R unless annotated as LP, 3” disk, or otherwise. Many Inyrdisk limited editions include inserts, booklets, or posters.

2013

(iyd78) KEVIN HAINEY — Space Plays the Bass
(iyd77) SEASHELLS — The Fondness of a Memory
(iyd76) WOLFCOW – Bad to the Rhinestone (3″)
(iyd75) HANDSOME BAND – Raw Poultry Got Sick From Touching My Hands
(iyd74) xNoBBQx – XP / Hot Cat
(iyd73) MAGIC CHEEZIES – Live Bootleg

2012

(iyd72) WINKIE’S FORCE – Winkie’s Force
(iyd71) FOSSILS / BLUE SPECTRUM (split)
(iyd70) ARMPIT – As Drunk As I Can Be
(iyd69) WOLFSKULL – Mighty Ungodly Change
(iyd68/jg02) VOIDFOLK – Dwell (LP)
(iyd67) KAPALI CARSI – Feverish Tears of Our Ancients (2xCD-R)
(iyd66) THE BAD TOUCH – The Bad Touch
(iyd65) NOT THE WIND NOT THE FLAG – The Star Maker
(iyd64) ROBERT RIDLEY-SHACKLETON – Splat Fever Soul
(iyd63) CAVE DUDES – No Grunts
(iyd62) DJ LONGHORN GRILLE – Taking Liberties
(iyd61) MAMA BAER – Drei 3-Stuecke-Kraken (bonus disk)
(iyd59/60) MAMA BAER – Exorcismes From All My Fingers (2xLP)
(iyd58) WOLFCOW – Wolfcesticide II
(iyd57) WET DIRT – Self Sabotage: The Early Year
(iyd56) SKULL BONG – Positive Infinity
(iyd55) PON DE REPLAY – Well, It’s Been A Splice
(iyd52) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – Medusa
(iyd51) VORVIS/HAINEY – VH3 (2xCD-R)

2011

(iyd54) VIDEO THRILLS – Video Thrills
(iyd53) JAMES BAILEY – Off Air
(iyd50) URBAN REFUSE GROUP – U.R.G. 3 (Collision)
(iyd49) DOOM TICKLER – Pleasure Cavern (3”)
(iyd48) THE SOUPCANS – Vintage Pizza Party Cassette
(iyd47+14) DOC DUNN – Doc Dunn
(iyd46) DRAINOLITH – Adam’s Sculpture
(iyd45) KAPALI CARSI – Blessed Clue In the 3 Sided Dream of Entwined Saxophones Heads & Busts (On the Sands at Barge Grove)
(iyd44) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – Diane Arbus (2xCD-R)
(iyd43) MAX GROSS – Fill Box
(iyd42) KNURL – Obturation (3”)

2010

(iyd41) MAN MADE HILL – Future Florists
(iyd40) VARIOUS – Street Liquors
(iyd39) BRIAN RURYK – Please Don’t Encourage Me
(iyd38) WOLFCOW – Walkmanizer (3”)
(iyd37/ffnn) CLINTON MACHINE – Gettin’ Personial (LP)
(iyd36) JIM SLAY – Live at The Hague
(iyd35/med06) AYAL SENIOR – Botched Raga #2 (3”)
(iyd34) V/H/R – Live at Tad’s Brunch
(iyd33) TODDLER BODY – Survival Smokers (2×3”)
(iyd32) UNDER HEAVEN – Batrachophrenoboocosmomachia
(iyd31) CAVE DUDES – Bro Magnon
(iyd30) GHOSTLIGHT – Robsoblat
(iyd29) PICNICBOY – I Hate You Because You Didn’t Marry Phil Collins (3”)
(iyd25*) WOLFCOW – Wolfcesticide

2009

(iyd28) AYAL SENIOR – Blue Sky on Mars (3×3”)
(iyd27) TODDLER BODY – Woom Toom
(iyd26) KAPALI CARSI – Fuck Roast
(iyd24) HUELEPEGA SOUND SYSTEM – En los Ojos de Dios, todos somos Ilegales
(iyd23) GHOSTLIGHT – Shade Grown

2008

(iyd22) THE PINK NOISE – Memory Box
(iyd21) AYAL SENIOR – Double Negative (2×3”)
(iyd20) AYAL SENIOR – Elephant Graveyard (3”)
(iyd19) AYAL SENIOR – Spacechurch
(iyd18) AYAL SENIOR & MATTHEW “DOC” DUNN – Crystal Fingers
(iyd17) VORVIS/HAINEY – Vorvis/Hainey
(iyd16) KANADA 70 – Trou Bel
(iyd15) CAVE DUDES – First Strolls

2007

(iyd13) BLASPHEMOUS MOCKERY Meets HEAVY WATER – Quaking Earth Vibrations
(iyd12) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – City of Women
(iyd11) TH W RBL R – Then I Saw Your Smile
(iyd10) WAPSTAN – Saturnales
(iyd09) CONSPIRACY OF FAMILIAR OBJECTS – In “No Greek”
(iyd08) PHOLDE – Of Matter By Which It Remains
(iyd07) JACOB HORWOOD – Catholic Church Party Poopers

2006

(iyd06) DISGUISES – Chrome Sores
(iyd05) ALL UNDER HEAVEN – The Sad Wings of Destiny
(iyd04) KAPALI CARSI – Saddle Sliding
(iyd03) CHARLES BALLS – Chtonic Polio Saddle, Guy
(iyd02) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – Women In Love

2005

(iyd01) KAPALI CARSI – Rumeic

Kevin Hainey pèse lourd parmi les cercles de passionnés de Toronto – si lourd que son nom de famille est devenu un mantra/cri de bande entonné lors des concerts quand ça se met à chauffer. Parallèlement à ses intrépides incursions en terrains musical (Disguises, The Pink Noise, Kapali Carsi, etc.), littéraire et plus encore, il est à la tête de la prolifique étiquette Inyrdisk, qui largue cargaison après cargaison de CD-R, de mini-disques et l’occasionnel mastodonte sur vinyle. Le katalogue de Hainey est une mine d’or pour les amateurs de sons repoussant tout statu quo, et cette interview est méritée depuis longtemps.

DJ Longhorn Grille – Jaunty, Hormonal

Wolfcow – Exsanguination, I Presume

Fossils – Science Tongs

Inyrdisk a commencé essentiellement avec ton projet solo, Kapali Carsi. Comment cela a-t-il débuté?

Avec Kapali Carsi, j’ai commencé à expérimenter et à enregistrer seul peu de temps après les débuts de Disguises. Tout d’un coup, je me suis retrouvé avec des heures de musique avec lesquelles je ne savais pas quoi faire. Une partie du matériel me plaisait particulièrement, j’ai donc simplement décidé de le faire paraître moi-même et c’est comme ça qu’Inyrdisk est né. À l’époque, je ne voulais pas avoir à emmerder qui que ce soit pour que sorte ce premier album de Kapali Carsi et je ne désirais pas non plus qu’il soit sur cassette. Tout le monde faisait des cassettes à ce moment-là et produire des CD-R à partir de chez moi était facile. J’ai donc simplement décidé d’en graver une petite quantité sans trop m’en faire avec ce qui arriverait ensuite.

Combien de temps a-t-il fallu avant que d’autres noms s’ajoutent à l’étiquette?

Women In Tragedy [Bob McCully] sortait aussi pas mal de CD-R de son côté au point où il ne pouvait plus les faire paraître suffisamment rapidement pour suivre son évolution musicale, je lui ai donc proposé de préparer quelque chose. Pas longtemps après, je me suis retrouvé au 61 Major en train de discuter de fonder un label, et Andrew Zukerman apparaît de nulle part et me dit : « Vraiment? Je vais te donner un album à faire paraître. » En tant qu’admirateur, j’étais flatté, et la première chose que je sais, j’ai une troisième parution. Puis il y a eu des trucs de Disguises et de Marco Landini, qui continue à me donner un appui de taille, et tout ça a continué à partir de là.

Est-ce que tu as l’impression de t’être distingué des autres en te concentrant sur les CD-R?

Les CD-R sont difficiles à vendre et c’est pourquoi on doit y mettre beaucoup d’amour. Les gens veulent des cassettes, particulièrement s’ils peuvent les jouer. On se débarrasse de ses CD en ce moment; ils sont totalement passés de mode. Or les CD-R sont différents des CD en raison de tout l’aspect artisanal. On peut les collectionner, se les procurer directement du groupe et ce n’est pas de la production de masse. L’étui en plastique est remplacé par une pochette faite à la main qui confère une touche artistique supplémentaire. Certains sont hésitants à s’en procurer parce qu’ils veulent le gros vinyle de luxe. Ce n’est pas exactement une malédiction, mais il y en a qui disent ne pas aimer du tout les CD-R.

De tout ton catalogue, quelle parution de Inyrdisk repousserait selon toi le plus les limites?

C’est difficile à dire. Parfois, j’ai l’impression que c’est mon propre matériel, ou encore celui de Mama Baer. Une partie du noise vraiment agressant est pas mal bizarre et probablement aliénant aux oreilles de beaucoup. Mais je ne sais pas, tout est pas mal bizarre. C’est ce que je veux encourager : plus de monde qui se laisse aller et qui ose faire ce qu’il croit approprié compte tenu de leurs désirs et de leurs habiletés. Les gens devraient se sentir libres de créer ce genre de musique sans avoir à se préoccuper de faire de l’argent ou de devenir des vedettes. Ce sont les sons que je considère neufs, avant-gardistes, ce qui n’est pas au diapason des tendances, des scènes ou des effets de mode temporaires. C’est un large spectre de l’underground et de ceux et celles qui font des choses fuckées. C’est nécessaire d’encourager ça si on ne veut pas que ça se perde, parce que sinon tout ce qu’il restera ce seront les lumières trop vives, la grande ville, des groupes, des groupes, un char pis une barge de groupes. J’aime entendre un bon groupe, mais seulement s’il fait quelque chose de vital, quelque chose qui vient du cœur et qu’il est capable de l’amener au stade suivant.

C’est intéressant de voir le nombre de personnes qui ont un label à Toronto. As-tu l’impression que chacun gravite autour de son orbite personnelle?

Tout à fait. Je crois que beaucoup dans cette ville ont une vision particulière et de la difficulté à voir au-delà de leurs propres préférences esthétiques. J’ai souvent suggéré que tous ceux et celles qui gèrent un label par eux-mêmes devraient s’unir. On pourrait appeler ça Postage Blues [Blues de la poste]. Mais la vérité, c’est que c’est peut-être mieux que les gens fassent des choses différentes. Si Jacob Horwood était impliqué, il finirait par imprimer toutes les pochettes pendant que les autres seraient assis devant leur ordinateur à se faire chier en envoyant des courriels aux distributeurs, tandis que d’autres plieraient des boites. Greydyn serait probablement à l’accueil.

Comment en est-on venu à crier à la blague « Hainey » dans les concerts?

C’est Martin Sasseville du label montréalais Brise-Cul qui a tout commencé. Je pense qu’on s’est rencontrés à un concert de AIDS Wolf ou de Pink Noise, et il s’est mis à se promener en demandant à tout le monde : « Connais-tu ce gars-là? C’est Kevin Hainey! » Et puis la première chose que tu sais, pendant qu’un groupe jouait, il se met à crier « Hainey! Hainey! » Il était juste trop dedans, et j’avoue que je trouvais ça assez bizarre. C’était la première fois que je le rencontrais et chaque fois que je l’ai revu par après il a continué à faire la même chose. D’autres comme Andrew Zukerman, Marco Landini et Deirdre de Pleasence se sont mis de la partie et ont amené ça à Toronto. Brian Seeger et Alex Moskos ont même commencé ça à Vancouver. C’est un phénomène pancanadien, et c’est bon pour tout le monde. Inyrdisk, c’est ma contribution pour appuyer la musique que j’aime. Je suis là pour tous les petits joueurs.

Dernière question : Peux-tu me parler de ton nouveau livre?

L’action se déroule 80 ans dans l’avenir. On suit un homme, ancien détective privé, qui est maintenant à la tête d’un corps de la paix. Ce sont des hommes qui vivent dans la rue et qui ont résisté au conformisme moderne en refusant de joindre les camps appelés Les Replis. Ils sont restés dans les villes, qui ont sombré aux mains de l’anarchie au profit des centres de détention, et tentent de mettre un terme à ce règne de terreur dans un Toronto du futur. Il y a des choses dont ils ne sont pas au courant, particulièrement en ce qui a trait au personnage principal, Clive Dyson. C’est très noir, mais aussi futuriste, post-dystopien-ce-que-tu-veux. Un pot-pourri paralittéraire au sein d’un monde désacralisé où un seul immeuble sur dix à accès à quoi que ce soit. Les gentils cherchent ensemble à imaginer à nouveau un monde où il fait bon vivre après des années de guerre, de pestilence et d’avarice. On suit Clive Dyson alors qu’il se bat contre toutes sortes de puissances spirituelles, passées et futures, avant son ultime contrat. Ça s’appelle Nothing Ends Pretty [Rien ne se termine bien].

Inyrdisk Katalog 2005-2013

Tous les titres sont parus sur CD-R sauf indication contraire en LP, mini-disque ou autres. Plusieurs éditions limitées de Inyrdisk comprennent des feuillets, des livrets ou des affiches.

2013

(iyd78) KEVIN HAINEY — Space Plays the Bass
(iyd77) SEASHELLS — The Fondness of a Memory
(iyd76) WOLFCOW – Bad to the Rhinestone (3″)
(iyd75) HANDSOME BAND – Raw Poultry Got Sick From Touching My Hands
(iyd74) xNoBBQx – XP / Hot Cat
(iyd73) MAGIC CHEEZIES – Live Bootleg

2012

(iyd72) WINKIE’S FORCE – Winkie’s Force
(iyd71) FOSSILS / BLUE SPECTRUM (split)
(iyd70) ARMPIT – As Drunk As I Can Be
(iyd69) WOLFSKULL – Mighty Ungodly Change
(iyd68/jg02) VOIDFOLK – Dwell (LP)
(iyd67) KAPALI CARSI – Feverish Tears of Our Ancients (2xCD-R)
(iyd66) THE BAD TOUCH – The Bad Touch
(iyd65) NOT THE WIND NOT THE FLAG – The Star Maker
(iyd64) ROBERT RIDLEY-SHACKLETON – Splat Fever Soul
(iyd63) CAVE DUDES – No Grunts
(iyd62) DJ LONGHORN GRILLE – Taking Liberties
(iyd61) MAMA BAER – Drei 3-Stuecke-Kraken (bonus disk)
(iyd59/60) MAMA BAER – Exorcismes From All My Fingers (2xLP)
(iyd58) WOLFCOW – Wolfcesticide II
(iyd57) WET DIRT – Self Sabotage: The Early Year
(iyd56) SKULL BONG – Positive Infinity
(iyd55) PON DE REPLAY – Well, It’s Been A Splice
(iyd52) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – Medusa
(iyd51) VORVIS/HAINEY – VH3 (2xCD-R)

2011

(iyd54) VIDEO THRILLS – Video Thrills
(iyd53) JAMES BAILEY – Off Air
(iyd50) URBAN REFUSE GROUP – U.R.G. 3 (Collision)
(iyd49) DOOM TICKLER – Pleasure Cavern (3”)
(iyd48) THE SOUPCANS – Vintage Pizza Party Cassette
(iyd47+14) DOC DUNN – Doc Dunn
(iyd46) DRAINOLITH – Adam’s Sculpture
(iyd45) KAPALI CARSI – Blessed Clue In the 3 Sided Dream of Entwined Saxophones Heads & Busts (On the Sands at Barge Grove)
(iyd44) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – Diane Arbus (2xCD-R)
(iyd43) MAX GROSS – Fill Box
(iyd42) KNURL – Obturation (3”)

2010

(iyd41) MAN MADE HILL – Future Florists
(iyd40) VARIOUS – Street Liquors
(iyd39) BRIAN RURYK – Please Don’t Encourage Me
(iyd38) WOLFCOW – Walkmanizer (3”)
(iyd37/ffnn) CLINTON MACHINE – Gettin’ Personial (LP)
(iyd36) JIM SLAY – Live at The Hague
(iyd35/med06) AYAL SENIOR – Botched Raga #2 (3”)
(iyd34) V/H/R – Live at Tad’s Brunch
(iyd33) TODDLER BODY – Survival Smokers (2×3”)
(iyd32) UNDER HEAVEN – Batrachophrenoboocosmomachia
(iyd31) CAVE DUDES – Bro Magnon
(iyd30) GHOSTLIGHT – Robsoblat
(iyd29) PICNICBOY – I Hate You Because You Didn’t Marry Phil Collins (3”)
(iyd25*) WOLFCOW – Wolfcesticide

2009

(iyd28) AYAL SENIOR – Blue Sky on Mars (3×3”)
(iyd27) TODDLER BODY – Woom Toom
(iyd26) KAPALI CARSI – Fuck Roast
(iyd24) HUELEPEGA SOUND SYSTEM – En los Ojos de Dios, todos somos Ilegales
(iyd23) GHOSTLIGHT – Shade Grown

2008

(iyd22) THE PINK NOISE – Memory Box
(iyd21) AYAL SENIOR – Double Negative (2×3”)
(iyd20) AYAL SENIOR – Elephant Graveyard (3”)
(iyd19) AYAL SENIOR – Spacechurch
(iyd18) AYAL SENIOR & MATTHEW “DOC” DUNN – Crystal Fingers
(iyd17) VORVIS/HAINEY – Vorvis/Hainey
(iyd16) KANADA 70 – Trou Bel
(iyd15) CAVE DUDES – First Strolls

2007

(iyd13) BLASPHEMOUS MOCKERY Meets HEAVY WATER – Quaking Earth Vibrations
(iyd12) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – City of Women
(iyd11) TH W RBL R – Then I Saw Your Smile
(iyd10) WAPSTAN – Saturnales
(iyd09) CONSPIRACY OF FAMILIAR OBJECTS – In “No Greek”
(iyd08) PHOLDE – Of Matter By Which It Remains
(iyd07) JACOB HORWOOD – Catholic Church Party Poopers

2006

(iyd06) DISGUISES – Chrome Sores
(iyd05) ALL UNDER HEAVEN – The Sad Wings of Destiny
(iyd04) KAPALI CARSI – Saddle Sliding
(iyd03) CHARLES BALLS – Chtonic Polio Saddle, Guy
(iyd02) WOMEN IN TRAGEDY – Women In Love

2005

(iyd01) KAPALI CARSI – Rumeic

Imprint :: Fadeaway Tapes


Drifting and pulsating throughout a shimmery vapour trail of releases, Fadeaway Tapes has quietly gained a foothold in the international cassette cosmos. Alongside fellow voyagers Le Révélateur, Élément Kuuda and the rosters of Hobo Cult, TLWS and Los Discos Enfantasmes, Fadeaway founders Nick Maturo and Ryan Connoly co-captain Montreal’s ongoing mission of kosmische discovery. Between label flagship Sundrips, a swath of side projects and likeminded signees, each batch offers a wealth of blissful sounds for third-mind meditation. Nick answered our Qs.
Jesse Locke
Managing Editor
Weird Canada // Texture Magazine
weirdcanada.com // texturemagazine.ca

Belarisk – Belarisk (excerpts)

Pierrot Lunaire – Lantern Floating Vessel (excerpts)

Sundrips – Phased Out (excerpts)

1 :: How did you launch your label and why? C.R.E.A.M.?
Fadeaway started mostly as a means of releasing our own material when nobody else wanted to, but it’s gradually turned into a fun way of working with other artists we appreciate and generally trying to create our own label aesthetic. I still consider myself more of a music guy than a label guy, so sometimes it can feel like a bit of a headache compared to just sitting down and jamming, but I’m very proud of all the work we’ve put into it since we started out.
2 :: To date, which of your releases has been: a) the best-seller, b) your favourite and c) the biggest bummer?
a) Hard to say, I think the batch we put out with 56K, the Thoughts on Air/Trailing split and Tobin’s Spirit Guide sold surprisingly quickly despite it being a larger run than we’d done before at the time.
b) Also hard to pick, but I’d say the Sundrips and Ophivchvs collaboration from 2010 still stands out to me as a beautiful tape in terms of both artwork and this crazy music that totally came out of nowhere.

c) Most of the Sundrips tapes we’ve done on Fadeaway are bummers in one way or another, but I might have to say Basejumping At Cliff Clavin has a particular “bummed” quality that I appreciate.

EVENT CLOAK – Physical Computing from Moduli TV on Vimeo.

3 :: What sets you apart from other labels? Music, art, liner notes, posters, glossy 8.5” x 11” head-shots?
I’d say we’re pushing music that’s a little bit different from other labels, although I do think there are some kindred spirits out there. Maybe we’re releasing things that are a little hazier than a lot of other straight up synth labels, although not necessarily in a lo-fi kind of way. I hesitate to use the word Ambient because I feel like that’s a term that’s too easy to just throw around for smooth, meditative music, but I guess there is some sort of a cross-over in to that kind of domain. All in all, it’s hard to pin it down definitively, as it really feels like a genuine extension of Sundrips and of our own tastes and interests, which can be pretty varied. So I guess that’s what makes it special to me.
4 :: Future plans? What can grippers look forward to gripping?
We just put out a new batch right now which includes a new Sundrips tape with a bit of a dreamier sound than usual, as well as a couple of gems from some friends that people will probably make people lose their minds. We have a few things beyond that lined up for Fadeaway in 2012 but nothing set in stone yet. There are also a few more Sundrips releases in the works on other labels, so stay tuned for that.
5 :: Kim Mitchell vs. Randy Bachman?
Tempted to say Randy Bachman out of spite for “Patio Lanterns”, but “Easy To Tame” (especially the video) is so great that it redeems him and then some. He also may be the only rock star to have never gotten laid because he was in a band, which is endearing. So, albeit with a little hesitation, Kim Mitchell.

Fadeaway Tapes Discography (to date)

FT001::Sundrips – Basejumping At Cliff Clavin(Cassette, 2010)
FT002::Sundrips – Hidden Dimensions(Cassette, 2010)
FT003::Sundrips – Star Master Live(3″ CD-R, 2010)
FT004::Video Diaries – Carryin’ On(Cassette, 2010)
FT005::Sundrips – Diffuse Contours(Cassette, 2010)
FT006::Sundrips & Ophivchvs – Satellites OF The Elders(Cassette, 2010)
FT007::Sundrips – Arrays(Cassette, 2010)
FT008::Cloudland Ballrooms & Sundrips – Split(Cassette, 2010)
FT009::Aphid Palisades – Aphid Palisades(Cassette, 2010)
FT010::56k – Calls In The Night(Cassette, 2010)
FT011::Thoughts On Air / Trailing – Split(Cassette, 2011)
FT012::Tobin’s Spirit Guide – Homesick(Cassette, 2011)
FT013::Belarisk – Belarisk(Cassette, 2011)
FT014::Pierrot Lunaire – Lantern Floating Vessel(Cassette, 2011)
FT015::Sundrips – Phased Out(Cassette, 2011)
FT016::Élément Kudda – Flight II(Cassette, 2011)
FT017::Sundrips – The Shapes Of THe Corridors(Cassette, 2011)
FT018::Event Cloak – Physical Computing(Cassette, 2011)
FT019::Trailing – Stingray / From the Top Of The Stairs [pt. 1 & 2](Cassette, 2011)


Dérivant et palpitant tout un long d’un chatoyant chemin vaporeux de sorties, Fadeaway Tapes a silencieusement gagné une prise de pied dans le cosmos de cassette international. Au long d’autres voyageurs Le Révélateur, Élément Kuuda et les répertoires de Hobo Cult, TLWS et Los Discos Enfantasmes, les fondateurs de Fadeaway, Nick Maturo et Ryan Connoly, le co-capitaine de la mission de Montréal en court pour une découverte de kosmische. Entre le label en vedette Sundrips , une bande de projets en parallèle et de signataires aux mêmes opinions, chaque fournée offre une richesse de sons divins pour une méditation de troisième esprit. Nick a répondu à nos Qs.

Jesse Locke
Éditeur en Chef
Weird Canada // Texture Magazine
weirdcanada.com // texturemagazine.ca

Belarisk – Belarisk (excerpts)

Pierrot Lunaire – Lantern Floating Vessel (excerpts)

Sundrips – Phased Out (excerpts)

1 :: Comment ave-vous lance votre label et pourquoi? C.R.E.A.M.?
Fadeaway a en partie commencé en tant que moyen pour faire sortir notre propre matériel quand personne d’autre le voulais, mais c’est graduellement tourné en façon amusante de travailler avec d’autres artistes que nous apprécions et généralement d’essayer de créer notre propre esthétique de label. Je me considère encore plus comme gars de musique qu’un gars de label, alors ça peut se ressentir un peu comme un mal de tête comparé à être juste assis et de jammer, mais je suis vraiment fier de tout le travail que nous y avons mis depuis que nous avons commencé.

2 :: Jusqu’à maintenant, laquelle de vos sorties a été: a) la meilleure vente b) votre préférée et c) la plus grosse déception?
a) dur à dire, je pense que le lot que nous avons sortie avec 56K, la divisée Thoughts on Air/ Trailing et Spirit Guide de Tobin se sont vendues de façon surprenante malgré qu’elle était plus longue que ce que nous avions fait avant dans le temps.
b) Aussi dur de choisir, mais je dirais la collaboration de Sundrips et Ophivchvs de 2010 se démarque encore pour moi comme une belle cassette autant en termes d’œuvre et cette musique folle qui a totalement sortie de nulle part.
c) La plupart des cassettes de Sundrips que nous avons fait sur Fadeaway sont des déceptions d’une façon ou d’une autre, mais j’aurais peut-être à dire que Basejumping At Cliff Clavin a une qualité particulièrement ‘’Agaçante’’ que j’apprécie.

EVENT CLOAK – Physical Computing from Moduli TV on Vimeo.

3 :: Qu’est-ce qui vous différencie des autres labels? De la musique, de l’art, des livrets, des affiches, de reluisant 8.5’’ x 11’’ et des photos?
Je dirais qu’on pousse de la musique qui est un peu différente des autres labels, malgré que je pense qu’il y ait quelques gens sur la même longueur d’onde alentours. Peut-être que nous sortons des choses qui sont un petit peu plus vagues que beaucoup d’autres honnêtes labels de synth, même si ce n’est pas nécessairement d’une façon lo-fi. J’hésite à utiliser le mot ‘’ambiant’’ parce que je sens comme si c’est un terme trop facile lancer ici et là pour la musique méditative douce, mais j’imagine qu’il y a un genre d’entre croisement dans ce genre de domaine. En tout, c’est dur de l’épingler définitivement, puisque ça ressemble vraiment comme une extension réelle de Sundrips et de nos goûts et intérêts, lesquels peuvent être très variés. Alors je présume que c’est ce qui le rend spécial pour moi.

4 :: Des plans futurs? Qu’est-ce que les saisisseurs peuvent avoir hâte de saisir?
Nous venons juste de sortir un nouveau lot maintenant lequel inclus une nouvelle cassette de Sundrips avec un peu de son plus rêveur qu’à l’habitude, aussi quelques gemmes de quelques amis dont les gens vont faire perdre la tête à d’autres. Nous avons quelques trucs qui s’alignent pour Fadeaway en 2012 mais rien n’est coulé dans le béton encore. Il y aussi quelques sorties de plus de Sundrips dans les travaux d’autres labels, alors restez sur la touche pour ça.

5 :: Kim Mitchell vs. Randy Bachman?
Je suis tempté de dire Randy Bachman par rancune à ‘’ Patio Lanterns’’, mais ‘’Easy To Tame’’ ( spécialement le vidéo) est tellement super que ça le rachète et encore. Il est peut-être aussi la seule rock star à ne s’être jamais envoyé en l’air parce qu’il était dans un bande, ce qui est charmant. Alors, quoique avec un peu d’hésitation, Kim Mitchell.

Fadeaway Tapes Discographie (à date)

FT001::Sundrips – Basejumping At Cliff Clavin(Cassette, 2010)
FT002::Sundrips – Hidden Dimensions(Cassette, 2010)
FT003::Sundrips – Star Master Live(3″ CD-R, 2010)
FT004::Video Diaries – Carryin’ On(Cassette, 2010)
FT005::Sundrips – Diffuse Contours(Cassette, 2010)
FT006::Sundrips & Ophivchvs – Satellites OF The Elders(Cassette, 2010)
FT007::Sundrips – Arrays(Cassette, 2010)
FT008::Cloudland Ballrooms & Sundrips – Split(Cassette, 2010)
FT009::Aphid Palisades – Aphid Palisades(Cassette, 2010)
FT010::56k – Calls In The Night(Cassette, 2010)
FT011::Thoughts On Air / Trailing – Split(Cassette, 2011)
FT012::Tobin’s Spirit Guide – Homesick(Cassette, 2011)
FT013::Belarisk – Belarisk(Cassette, 2011)
FT014::Pierrot Lunaire – Lantern Floating Vessel(Cassette, 2011)
FT015::Sundrips – Phased Out(Cassette, 2011)
FT016::Élément Kudda – Flight II(Cassette, 2011)
FT017::Sundrips – The Shapes Of THe Corridors(Cassette, 2011)
FT018::Event Cloak – Physical Computing(Cassette, 2011)
FT019::Trailing – Stingray / From the Top Of The Stairs [pt. 1 & 2](Cassette, 2011)

Imprint :: Electric Voice


Matt Samways is a young upstart from Truro, the so-called ‘hub’ of Nova Scotia. Before touching the age of 20 he led the pitiless doom punk of Pig, started the Electric Voice imprint, and played sideman to Scribbler and the Friendly Dimension. He has once again departed on another musical continuum with his latest project, Transfixed, a more sinister and contemplative vision of the futuristic isolation and robotic vocals of Kraftwerk and Gary Numan.

Electric Voice is not exclusive to the regional talent of the 902, but has entertained releases from across Canada, with ambitions to release music from around the globe. Up next is a 12” from Jeff & Jane Hudson, who were part of the New York No Wave movement during the late ’70s and early ’80s, arguably one of the greatest incubators for creative music of all genres, ever. Matt kindly took the time to answer some questions.

Zachary Fairbrother
Contributor
Weird Canada // Lantern
http://weirdcanada.com // http://lantern.bandcamp.com

Transfixed – Coaxial Mirage

What inspired you to start a label?
It was conceived as a vanity label in 2008 with a partner I was collaborating with at the time, who actually titled the label. It was suggested by a peer that we began documenting our releases to enhance professionalism. We had no intentions of channeling anything other than our own material. As our group was disbanding a personal desire to continue the archive still existed. My friends are all making extremely good music and I can’t suppress supporting it materialize.

Since Pig split, you’ve devoted much of your attention to Electric Voice. Are you taking a break from music or do you prefer running label?

I wasn’t really interested in performing or releasing my own music at the time, but I wanted to keep contributing to the physical production of it. I hold a strong value in the aesthetic of sound and its presentation, and the idea of being able to manipulate it is appealing to me. About a year ago I started receiving funding from the Government of Nova Scotia via the Emerging Business Music Program on behalf of Electric Voice. That defiantly provided me with a lot of motivation to get the label off the ground and start working outside the current community in Halifax and Montreal. Though I am becoming passionate about the label, I am a musician first and still focus on writing and recording with aspirations of touring the material. Putting a lot of energy into the label in turn benefits my musical endeavors.

Transfixed is quite a departure from your previous musical adventures. How is it related/un-related to other projects?

The formation of Transfixed was completely organic. It is a collaborative project between myself, Ian Phillips and a number of rotating musicians. We had no intentions of forming a group when we first started playing together, but when we discovered that the house we had been jamming in was previously owned by Ian’s grandparents in the early ’60s, and that his grandfather grew up in the house, we decided to channel our time spent there with Transfixed. It has become an interesting and rapidly progressing project that there’s no reason to stop. Our ideas are constantly abstracting themselves and moving faster than we create the music. It’s exciting and with the lack of expectation we have become more prolific than any other project I’ve been involved with.
With my other projects/collaborations there has been a lot more premeditation on the sounds and how they should be presented. It becomes tough when a collective of people share the same visions without matching the logistics. The extrasensory parts of music can be difficult to communicate. I also work with Troy Richter and the Friendly Dimension in molding his sounds.

Synthesizers or guitars?

Guitars that sound like synthesizers. I think the combination can be a masterful force when properly conducted. I am ultimately a guitar player, but I’ve been spending a lot of time learning the keyboard. For the last few months I’ve hardly touched my guitar.

You hitchhike between Truro and Halifax. It seems like hitchhiking is a fading activity. Do you enjoy it, and do you have any good stories? Have you met some interesting people? Where is the farthest you’ve hitched?

It’s never really been something I enjoyed, but it’s done out of necessity. When I cannot afford to be bussing back and forth, it’s usually my only means to get to practices/gatherings, as all of the bands I play in are based in Halifax. I live back and forth from Halifax and Truro, which are about an hour’s drive apart. Truro is very isolated and is a great environment to work in, though can be compromising with my schedule.
I’ve only been hitching through Nova Scotia and Newfoundland for the last five years. I’ve been consistently traveling this way and have never encountered any trouble. Dress nice with a clean appearance. A lot of mothers have picked me up, also on- and off-duty police officers. The only questionable encounter was a lady who spoke in a thick rural Nova Scotian tongue. She picked my friend and I up in the dark and was drinking Faxe 10 (strong beer). She had what looked like 3-4 empty cans on the floor of her side of the car. It was a little unsetting but she was considerably collected and coherent. She had a bizarre way of twisting her words together that was oddly poetic.

You seem like an ambitious young man. What are your dreams for the Electric Voice Label?

I don’t class my visions with the label as dreams, because I don’t think they are anything we can’t achieve. The people I surround myself with are individually gifted at what they do. Thankfully all of the resources are presented, making it simple to have a pragmatic sense of work. I certainly am young; therefore I am not looking to execute the foundation process in short time. I will keep experimenting with formats and presentation, and try not to exhaust our resources. In time I will spend time refining the label and as expected with any small business or hobby, sustainability is key.

What other labels do you find inspiring and/or really dig and why?
To those who know me this may sound biased because Brett is a good friend, but I really like what he has done with Campaign For Infinity. He has released some of my favourite cassettes in the last few years (notable: Teenage Panzerkorps, Horrid Red, Grand Trine, Rape Faction). I also have a lot of respect for Darcy Spidle and Divorce Records, as it was a prominent influence of my origins in the community of Halifax. He is really passionate about what he does and it shows in his work. OBEY Convention is a festival he puts on every year or so and is the highlight of the year in Halifax, in my opinion. I am happy to be helping him with the festival in 2012.
I have some collaborative release coming out with Danish label Skrot Up as well as works with Montreal’s Hobo Cult. Some other notable active labels: Bruised Tongue, Captured Tracks, Dark Entries Records, FLA Tapes & Records and Arbutus Records. I also really dig the consistency in the aesthetic of labels like Sacred Bones and Night People.

Electric Voice Discography (to date)

EV001::Albino Slug II – EP(Cassette, 2008)
EV002::Pig – Everything Isn’t EP(CD-R, 2009)
EV003::Vacuum – Tormented Bear EP(Cassette, 2009)
EV004::Pig – Elbow Witch(Cassette, 2009)
EV005::Church Hammer – Vol. I(Cassette, 2010)
EV006::Church Hammer – Vol. II(Cassette, 2010)
EV007::Church Hammer/Vacuum – Split(Cassette, 2010)
EV008::Pig – I’ve seen the future and it’s no place for me Compilation(Cassette, 2010)
EV009::Various ArtistsElectric Voice Compilation Vol I(Cassette, 2010)
EV010::Milksnake – EP(Cassette, 2010)
EV011::Friendly Dimension – Live: In the Pleasant Horrors of Space EP(Cass., 2010)
EV012::Lantern – Deliver me from Nowhere(Cassette, 2010)
EV013::Gigas – Tied Down to the Ones You Love LP(Cassette, 2010)
EV014::Friendly Dimension – Bath Tub EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV015::Duzheknew – LOL HELL EP(Cancelled)
EV016::Wicked Crafts – “No Cure” EP(Cass. (split w/ Campaign for Infinity, 2011)
EV017::U.S. Girls – EP(7″, 2011)
EV018::The Friendly Dimension // 30 Year Old City Hex – “Poltergeist City”(Cass., 2011)
EV019::Babysitter – “Paul’s Cab” Single(Cassette, 2011)
EV020::Monroeville Music Center – Les Defauts des Fabrication EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV021::Milksnake – Lenny Bruce EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV022::Membrain – EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV023::Lantern // The Ether – Split(Cassette, 2011)
EV024::Play Guitar – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV025::Grand Trine – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV026::Bad Vibrations – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV027::Transfixed – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV028::Crosss – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV029::Bloodhouse – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV030::Hand Cream // Crosss – Split(Cassette, 2011)
EV031::Passion Party – EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV032::Cat Bag // Transfixed – Bunker // Body Language(12″ w/ Claire Dragon, 2011)
EV033::Rape Faction // Chevalier Avant Garde – Split(Cassette, 2011)
EV034::Various ArtistsElectric Voice Compilation Vol. II(12″ Cassette, 2011)
EV035::Jeff & Jane Hudson – In My Car // Computer Jungle (+ Club mixes)(12″, 2011)
EV036::Visual works by Jacqueline Lachance(VHS, 2012)

(Editor’s Note: Certain titles from this discography were not released by Electric Voice proper. As history’s nature is to continually re-write itself, so, too, shall we gaze pastward at Matt’s creative efforts and understand his temporal stream within the vision of Electric Voice.)


Matt Samways est un petit nouveau de Truro, le soi disant ‘’Centre’’ de Nouvelle-Écosse. Avant d’atteindre l’âge de 20 ans, il menait le punk tragique sans pitié de Pig, commençait l’empreinte Electric Voice et jouait comme sideman pour Scribbler et the Friendly Dimension. Il est encore une fois parti sur une autre continuum musical avec son dernier projet, Transfixed, une vision plus sinistre et contemplative d’unefuturistic isolation et de vocales robotique de Kraftwerk et Gary Numan. Electric Voice n’est pas exclusif au talent régional du 902, mais a reçu des sorties d’à travers le Canada, avec l’ambition de faire sortir de la musique de partout autour du globe. À venir est un 12’’ de Jeff & Jane Hudson, qui faisait parti du mouvement New York No Wave pendant la fin des années 70 et début 80, discutablement un des plus grands incubateurs pour la musique créative de tout les genres, à jamais. Matt a gentiment prit le temps de répondre à quelques questions.
Zachary Fairbrother
Contributor Weird Canada // Lantern
http://weirdcanada.com // http://lantern.bandcamp.com

Transfixed – Coaxial Mirage

Qu’est-ce qui vous a inspire à commencer votre label?
Ce fut conçu en tant que label de vanité en 2006 avec un partenaire avec lequel je collaborais dans ce temps-là, qui a actuellement nommé le label. Il fut suggéré par un pair que nous commencions à documenter nos sorties pour augmenter notre professionnalisme. Nous n’avions pas l’intention de canaliser quoique ce soit autre que notre propre matériel. Alors que notre groupe de démantelait, un désir personnel de continuer l’archive existait encore. Mes amis font tous de l’extrêmement bonne musique et je ne peut pas m’empêcher de la supporter pour la matérialiser.
Depuis que Pig s’est divisé, vous avez accordé beaucoup de votre attention à Electric Voice. Prenez vous une pause de la musique ou vous préférez faire un label?
Je n’étais pas vraiment intéressé à jouer ou à faire sortir ma propre musique dans le temps, mais je voulais continuer de contribuer à la production physique de celle-ci. Je possède une forte valeur dans l’esthétique du son et sa présentation et l’idée d’être capable de le manipuler est attirante pour moi. Environ un an plus tôt, j’ai commencé à recevoir des fonds du Gouvernement de Nouvelle-Écosse via le Programme de Musique des Entreprises Émergeantes au nom d’Electric Voice. Cela m’a clairement donné beaucoup de motivation pour faire partir le label et commencer à travailler hors de la communauté actuelle à Halifax et Montréal. Malgré que je deviens passionné à propos du label, je suis un musicien avant tout et je suis toujours concentré sur écrire et enregistrer avec l’aspiration de faire du matériel de tournée. Mettre beaucoup d’énergie dans le label en retour profite à mes efforts musicaux.

Transfixed est tout un départ de vos aventures musicales précédents. Comment est-ce relié/ ou non à d’autres projets?

La formation de Transfixed fut complètement organique. C’est un projet collaboratif entre moi-même, Ian et Phillips et un nombre de musiciens en rotation. Nous n’avions pas l’intention de former un groupe quand nous avons commencé à jouer ensemble au début, mais quand on a découvert que la maison dans laquelle nous jammions avait précédemment appartenue aux grands-parents de Ian au début des années 60 et que son grand père avait grandit dans la maison, nous avons décidé de concentrer notre temps passé là, avec Transfixed. C’est devenu un intéressant et rapidement progressant projet qui n’avait pas de raison d’arrêter. Nos idées sont constamment entrain de s’extrairent et de bouger plus vite que nous créons la musique. C’est excitant et avec le manque d’attente nous somme devenu plus prolifique qu’avec n’importe quel autre projet dans lequel nous avions été impliqués.
Avec mes autres projets/collaborations, il y a eu beaucoup plus préméditation sur les sons et comment ils devraient être présentés. Ça devient difficile quand une organisation de gens partage les mêmes visions sans les mêmes logistiques. Les parties extrasensorielles de la musique peuvent être difficile à communiquer. Je travaille aussi avec Troy Richter et les Friendly Dimension pour former ses sons.

Vous faites de l’auto-stop entre Truro et Halifax. Il semble que faire de l’auto-stop est une activité déclinante. Aimez-vous ça et avez-vous quelques bonnes histoires? Avez-vous rencontré des gens intéressants? Où est-ce le plus loin que ayez fait de l’auto-stop?
Ça n’a jamais été quelque chose que j’apprécie, mais je le fais par nécessité. Quand je ne peux pas me permettre de prendre l’autobus aller-retour, c’est habituellement mon seul moyen d’aller au pratiques/ rassemblements, puisque tout les groupes dans lesquels je joue sont basés à Halifax. Je vis en va-et-viens d’Halifax et Truro, lesquelles sont à environ une heure de route l’une de l’autre. Truro est très isolée et c’est un super environnement pour travailler, mais peut être compromettant avec mon horaire. J’ai seulement fais de l’auto-stop à travers la Nouvelle-Écosse et Terre-Neuve pour les dernière cinq années. J’ai constamment voyagé dans cette direction et j’ai jamais rencontré de problème. Habillez-vous bien avec une apparence propre. Beaucoup de mères m’ont ramassé, aussi des officiers de police hors et en service. La seule rencontre questionnable fut avec une dame qui parlait avec un gros accent rural de Nouvelle-Écosse. Elle nous a ramassé moi et mon ami dans la noirceur et elle buvait du Faxe 10 (une bière forte). Elle avait ce qui semblait être 3-4 cannes vides sur le sol de son côté de la voiture. C’était un peu troublant, mais elle semblait considérablement posée et cohérente. Elle avait une façon bizarre de tourner ses mots ensembles qui était étrangement poétique.

Vous semblez être un jeune homme ambitieux. Quels sont vos rêves pour le label d’Electric Voice?

Je ne classe pas mes visions avec le label comme étant des rêves, parce que je ne pense pas qu’il y est quelque chose que l’on ne peut réaliser. Les gens dont je m’entours sont individuellement habile à ce qu’ils font. Heureusement, toutes les ressources sont présentées, rendant simple le fait d’avoir un sens pragmatique du travail. Je suis certainement jeune; alors je n’essais pas d’exécuter le procédé de fondation en un bref délai. Je vais continuer d’expérimenter avec des formats et des présentations et essayer de ne pas épuiser nos ressources. Au moment venu, je passerai du temps pour raffiner le label et comme attendu avec n’importe quelle petite entreprise ou passe-temps, la soutenabilité est la clef.

Quels autres labels trouvez-vous inspirants et/ou que vous aimez vraiment et pourquoi?

Pour ceux qui me connaissent cela va peut-être sonner biaisé parce que Brette est un bon ami, mais j’aime vraiment ce qu’il a fait avec Campaign For Infinity. Il a sorti quelque unes de mes cassettes préférées dans les dernières années (notable : Teenage Panzerkorps, Horrid Red, Grand Trine, Rape Faction). j’ai aussi beaucoup de respect pour Darcy Spidle et Divorce Records, comme c’était une influence proéminente de mes origines dans la communauté d’Halifax. Il est vraiment passionné à propos de ce qu’il fait et cela paraît dans son travial. OBEY Convention es un festival qu’il monte chaque année ou peu près et c’est le moment for de l’année à Halifax, à mon avis. Je suis content de l’aider avec le festival en 2012. J’ai quelques sorties collaboratives qui s’en viennent avec le label Danois Skrot Up et aussi du travail avec Hobo Cult de Montréal. Quelques autres labels actifs signifiants : Bruised Tongue, Captured Tracks, Dark Entries Records, FLA Tapes & Records et Arbutus Records. J’aime vraiment aussi la consistence dans l’esthétique des labels comme Sacred Bones et Night People.

Electric Voice Discographie (à date)

EV001::Albino Slug II – EP(Cassette, 2008)
EV002::Pig – Everything Isn’t EP(CD-R, 2009)
EV003::Vacuum – Tormented Bear EP(Cassette, 2009)
EV004::Pig – Elbow Witch(Cassette, 2009)
EV005::Church Hammer – Vol. I(Cassette, 2010)
EV006::Church Hammer – Vol. II(Cassette, 2010)
EV007::Church Hammer/Vacuum – Split(Cassette, 2010)
EV008::Pig – I’ve seen the future and it’s no place for me Compilation(Cassette, 2010)
EV009::Various ArtistsElectric Voice Compilation Vol I(Cassette, 2010)
EV010::Milksnake – EP(Cassette, 2010)
EV011::Friendly Dimension – Live: In the Pleasant Horrors of Space EP(Cass., 2010)
EV012::Lantern – Deliver me from Nowhere(Cassette, 2010)
EV013::Gigas – Tied Down to the Ones You Love LP(Cassette, 2010)
EV014::Friendly Dimension – Bath Tub EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV015::Duzheknew – LOL HELL EP(Cancelled)
EV016::Wicked Crafts – “No Cure” EP(Cass. (split w/ Campaign for Infinity, 2011)
EV017::U.S. Girls – EP(7″, 2011)
EV018::The Friendly Dimension // 30 Year Old City Hex – “Poltergeist City”(Cass., 2011)
EV019::Babysitter – “Paul’s Cab” Single(Cassette, 2011)

EV020::Monroeville Music Center – Les Defauts des Fabrication EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV021::Milksnake – Lenny Bruce EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV022::Membrain – EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV023::Lantern // The Ether – Split(Cassette, 2011)
EV024::Play Guitar – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV025::Grand Trine – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV026::Bad Vibrations – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV027::Transfixed – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV028::Crosss – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV029::Bloodhouse – Single(Cassette, split release w/ Craft Singles, 2011)
EV030::Hand Cream // Crosss – Split(Cassette, 2011)
EV031::Passion Party – EP(Cassette, 2011)
EV032::Cat Bag // Transfixed – Bunker // Body Language(12″ w/ Claire Dragon, 2011)
EV033::Rape Faction // Chevalier Avant Garde – Split(Cassette, 2011)
EV034::Various ArtistsElectric Voice Compilation Vol. II(12″ Cassette, 2011)
EV035::Jeff & Jane Hudson – In My Car // Computer Jungle (+ Club mixes)(12″, 2011)
EV036::Visual works by Jacqueline Lachance(VHS, 2012)

(Note de l’éditeur: Certains titres de cette discographie n’étaient pas mis en vente par Electric Voice proprement. Comme est la nature de l’histoire de se répéter continuellement, donc, aussi, devrions nous regarder vers le passé les efforts créatifs de Matt et comprendre son courant temporel dans la vision d’Electric Voice.)

Imprint :: Pleasence Records


Swirling within the endless cosmos of polyphonic doctrine, Toronto’s Pleasence Records remain an ardent force of diversity alongside the orthogonal streams of TO’s new underground. Their catalog grows in dimension with each mind-boggling effort, exemplified by the soft yacht-rock of Young Guv easing into Man Made Hill’s burnt fidelity. I was stoked to hear that Managing Editor Jesse Locke met with the head honchos from Pleasence this week. Dig below.
Aaron Levin
Big Lurch
Weird Canada
weirdcanada.com

The Pink Noise – Galapagos

Man Made Hill – Hard Breeze Is Gonna Blow

Induced Labour – Whore Eyes

1 :: How did you launch your label and why? C.R.E.A.M.?
We were both at an Induced Labour show in early 2010 where Leslie (Predy) smashed a pint glass off the stage, dove into the shards, and was dragged by her pants around her ankles by the crowd. Deirdre later picked the glass out of her ass. That night we both fell in love with them. Later that spring, over some very fine homemade Italian food with friends, Deirdre stated her intention to release their record and James wanted in. The record took a while to put out so we released a Vagina Bison tape, a 7″ split from Gay/White Suede, and a 7″ EP from Suitcase Sam in the interim. By the time the Induced Labour record came out, we were already working with more artists. It’s been rolling steadily ever since.

2 :: To date, which of your releases has been: a) the best-seller, b) your favourite and c) the biggest bummer?
Young Guv & The Scuzz has undoubtedly been our best seller. We’ve sold that record all over the world. He also recorded the Tropics, Huckleberry Friends, and Gay/Sexy Merlin records we’ve put out. He’s one of the most prolific guys in Toronto right now. The Soupcans and Suitcase Sam have also worked very hard to get their records out there, selling a few at every show, playing as often as they can around town and touring Canada and the States.

As for B, that’s like picking your favourite child. We’re so proud of them all! Our favourite is usually whatever we’re working at the moment, since usually that means we’re listening to it over and over and over before the final press. You become quite intimate with the record, like you’ve known it for years.

The only time it feels like a bummer is when a record we really love doesn’t have the immediate impact we feel it deserves. We become like angry parents at their kid’s hockey game.

3 :: What sets you apart from other labels? Music, art, liner notes, posters, glossy 8.5” x 11” head-shots?
We initially connected over music by both being record collectors. Deirdre works at She Said Boom records in Toronto and James would hang out there for hours browsing, yakking about bands, listening to different records. We like to think there’s a certain diversity in our catalog that reflects our broad tastes. We never wanted to have a genre label that would only release a specific style. I don’t think we could ever commit to that, there’s just too much different stuff we’re into.

4 :: Future plans? What can grippers look forward to gripping?
By this time next year you’ll be hearing records by Pon De Replay, Fleshtone Aura, John Milner You’re So Boss, Wasted Nymph, Odonis Odonis, a VHS tape of the last Induced Labour performance, and hopefully a few others.

Pleasence Records Discography (to date)

PR000::Vagina Bison – Self Titled(2010, Cassette)
PR001::Induced Labour – Self Titled(2010, 7″)
PR002::Gay/White Suede – Split(2010, 7″)
PR003::Suitcase Sam – Get It To Go(2010, 7″)
PR004::Pleasence T-Shirt
PR005::The Soupcans – Erotic Nightmare(2010, 12″)
PR006::Sexy Merlin – Self Titled(2011, 7″)
PR007::Gay/Sexy Merlin – Self Titled(2011, 7″)
PR008::Young Guv & The Scuzz – Bedroom Eyes b/w Rumors(2011, 7″)
PR009::Tropics – Pale Trash b/w Earmarked(2011, 7″)
PR010::Huckleberry Friends – Vision b/w Disaster Keyz(2011, 7″)
PR011::The Pink Noise – Gilded Flowers(2011, 12″)
PR012::Man Made Hill/Young Truck – (2011, 12″)


Tourbillonnant dans l’infini cosmos de doctrine polyphoniques, les Pleasence Records de Toronto restent une force ardente de diversité au long des courants orthogonaux du nouveaux sous-terrain de TO. Leur catalogue grandit en dimensions avec chaque effort ahurissant, exemplifié par le doux rock de yacht de Young Guy se relâchant dans la fidélité brûlée de Man Made Hill. Je fus excité d’entendre que l’éditeur en chef, Jesse Locke, a rencontré le grand patron de Pleasence cette semaine. Creusez ci-dessous.
Aaron Levin
Gros vacillement.
Weird Canada
weirdcanada.com

The Pink Noise – Galapagos

Man Made Hill – Hard Breeze Is Gonna Blow

Induced Labour – Whore Eyes

1:: Comment avez-vous lancé votre label et pourquoi? C.R.E.A.M.?
Nous étions tous les deux à un spectacle de Induced Labour au début de 2010 où Leslie (Predy) a écrasé une chope de verre hors de la scène, a plongé dans les éclats et fut tirée par ses pantalons autour de ses chevilles par la foule. Deirdre a ramassé plus tard le verre hors de son derrière. Cette nuit là, nous avons tous deux tombé en amour avec eux. Plus tard ce printemps là, en mangeant un repas de mets italiens finement préparé maison avec des amis, Deirdre a déclaré son intention de faire sortir leur enregistrement et James le voulais. L’enregistrement a pris un certain temps à faire alors on a sorti une cassette de Vagina Bison, un 7’’ divisé de Gay/White Suede, et un 7’’ EP de Suitcase Sam dans l’intérim. Par le temps que l’enregistrement d’ Induced Labour fut sorti, Nous travaillions déjà avec plus d’artistes. Ça l’a roulé stablement depuis ce temps là.
2:: Jusqu’à maintenant, laquelle de vos sorties a été: a) la meilleure vente b) votre préférée et c) la plus grosse déception?
Young Guy & The Scuzz ont sans aucun doute été nos meilleures ventes. On a vendu cet enregistrement partout autour du monde. Il a aussi enregistré les records de Tropics, HuckleBerry Friends et Gay/Sexy Merlin que nous avons faits. Il est un des mecs les plus prolifiques à Toronto présentement. Les Soupcans et Suitcase Sam ont aussi travaillé très dur pour faire sortir leur enregistrement, en vendant quelques uns à chaque spectacle, jouant aussi souvent qu’ils le pouvaient autour de la ville et faisant des tournées au Canada et dans les États. Pour B, c’Est comme choisir ton enfant préféré, nous en sommes tous fières!! Notre préféré est habituellement peu importe sur quoi on travaille présentement, puisque ça veut dire qu’on l’écoute encore et encore et encore avant le pressage final. Vous devenez plutôt intime avec le record, comme si vous l’Aviez connu pour des années. Les seules fois que c’est ressenti comme une déception c’Est quand un record qu’on aime vraiment n’a pas l’impact immédiat que nous sentons qu’il mérite. Nous devenons comme des parents fâchés à la partie d’hockey de leur enfant.

3:: Qu’est-ce qui vous différencie des autres labels? De la musique, de l’art, des livrets, des affiches, de reluisant 8.5’’ x 11’’ et des photos?
Nous avions initialement connectés avec la musique en étant tous deux des collectionneurs de records. Deirdre travaille aux enregistrements She Said Boom à Toronto et James allait là pendant heures, se promenant et jacassant à propos de groupes, écoutant différents enregistrements. Nous aimons penser qu’il y a une certaine diversité dans nos catalogue qui reflète nos larges goûts. Nous n’avons jamais voulu avoir un label genre qui sortirait seulement un style spécifique. Je ne pense pas qu’on pourrait s’engager à ça, il y a juste trop de trucs différent que nous aimons.
4 :: Des plans futurs? Qu’est-ce que les saisisseurs peuvent avoir hâte de saisir?
By this time next year you’ll be hearing records by a VHS tape of the last Induced Labour performance, and hopefully a few others. À ce temps si l’année prochaine vous entendrez des records de Pon De Replay, Fleshtone Aura, John Milner You’re So Boss, Wasted Nymph, Odonis Odonis, par une cassette VHS de la dernière performance de Induced Labour et on espère, quelques unes de plus.

Pleasence Records Discography (à date)
PR000::Vagina Bison – Self Titled(2010, Cassette)
PR001::Induced Labour – Self Titled(2010, 7″)
PR002::Gay/White Suede – Split(2010, 7″)
PR003::Suitcase Sam – Get It To Go(2010, 7″)
PR004::Pleasence T-Shirt
PR005::The Soupcans – Erotic Nightmare(2010, 12″)
PR006::Sexy Merlin – Self Titled(2011, 7″)
PR007::Gay/Sexy Merlin – Self Titled(2011, 7″)
PR008::Young Guv & The Scuzz – Bedroom Eyes b/w Rumors(2011, 7″)
PR009::Tropics – Pale Trash b/w Earmarked(2011, 7″)
PR010::Huckleberry Friends – Vision b/w Disaster Keyz(2011, 7″)
PR011::The Pink Noise – Gilded Flowers(2011, 12″)
PR012::Man Made Hill/Young Truck – (2011, 12″)

Imprint :: Prairie Fire Tapes // Dub Ditch Picnic


Winnipeg cassette label Prairie Fire Tapes and its bratty little brother Dub Ditch Picnic might be relatively new on the scene, but both have staked a claim with their ongoing stream of head-tweaking sounds. From the warped pop of Bill Northcott and his various aliases (F.P. Tranquilizer, The Incinerators, Microdot) to heavier hitters like Fossils, Mongst and Worker, Weird Canada favourite Fletcher Pratt, the unclassifiable No UFO’s and so much more, co-founders Chris Jacques (White Dog) and Cole Peters (Gomeisa, Secret Girls) are carving out their own piece of the pie. We spoke to Chris about PFT and DDP’s past, present and future.

Jesse Locke
Managing Editor
Weird Canada // Texture Magazine
http://weirdcanada.com // http://texturemagazine.ca/wordpress

Mongst – Negative Liberty

Secret Girls – Ten Thousand Winter

Fletcher Pratt – Weird Dub


1 :: How did you launch your label and why? C.R.E.A.M.?
The story begins Jan. 2010 when Prairie Fire Tapes hit the scene. Cole Peters and I were talking about releasing a split cassette. We had distributed the workload to me sourcing the tape and production and Cole would do the art and have the j-cards made up. I think a day after we decided to do the tape we thought, well, let’s give running a label a shot. A few months in, I started to become aware of bands that I wanted to work with that I couldn’t justify having as part of the PF roster. So in order to keep Prairie Fire focused on drone, noise, and experimentalism, I launched Dub Ditch Picnic in June of 2010. The releases on DDP really mirror my record collection — it’s pretty vast and varied. I have a dream of being able to have one or both of the labels make the leap from cassettes only into pressing LPs in the next year or so. But vinyl is pretty time consuming and my time is pretty limited. So once I have completed a few other major projects that currently have my attention, I will look at releasing a slew of really weird records.

2 :: To date, which of your releases has been: a) the best-seller, b) your favourite and c) the biggest bummer?
The best sellers have all been on Prairie Fire — Tom Carter, Kplr, Worker, and the Gomeisa tapes consistently flew out the doors. Picking my favourite would be much harder — the Solars tape was stunning. I still get goosebumps when I jam that. The Krautheim cassette on DDP would have to be one of my all time faves. Those guys turned in one awesome recording. No bummers really. There have been a couple releases that didn’t resonate with folks for one reason or another. Take the last batch of PF tapes. I think all five are solid — Alms, White Dog, Secret Girls, Mongst, and White Creeps. We released those right around the time of the mail strike and we’ve had a real time trying to get them in the hands of people. The biggest bummer is releasing a great tape to a disinterested public. I haven’t been disappointed by any of the artists we’ve worked with. I stand behind every single tape we’ve done.

3 :: What sets you apart from other labels? Music, art, liner notes, posters, glossy 8.5” x 11” head-shots?
The art direction, design and our approach to making the best sounding tape possible sets us apart from other labels. I buy a lot of stuff, and much of it on cassette. I feel really let down when I get a tape that was mastered poorly or duplicated with more hiss than music. I have sourced out some professional grade duplicators as well as some higher end decks to for mastering. I do checks throughout the process to make sure that the tapes are sounding the way they should. I have redone a few runs because that tape was too quiet or had too much hiss or whatever. We are musicians and music fans — we treat our bands and our customers the way we want to be treated.

4 :: Future plans? What can grippers look forward to gripping?
On Prairie Fire we’ve been setting up releases with Misner Space, Sundrips, and a full length Horders cassette. Dub Ditch has been working on a few comps, one of new Finnish and New Zealand underground music. We also are in the midst of making masters for an Auntie Dada/Preanderthals release, a Velvet Chrome retrospective, a Shaker Hymns cassette, and new recording by DJ Co-Op/Tim Hoover.

5 :: Kim Mitchell vs. Randy Bachman?
I’m a prairie guy, born and raised. So even though Vinyl Tap is the worst radio show ever — Randy B. all the way.

Prairie Fire Tapes Discography (to date)

PF-001::White Dog // Gomeisa – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-002::Art Muscle // no Rgans – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-003::Repulsive Bile – Emetophilia(2010, Cassette)
PF-004::Solars – Mist(2010, Cassette)
PF-005::White Dog – Retribution(2010, Cassette)
PF-006::Museums of Sleep – Self Titled(2010, Cassette)
PF-007::Pretty Princess // Secret Girls – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-008::White Dog – Holodomor(2010, Cassette)
PF-009::Gomeisa – Blossoming Flesh(2010, Cassette)
PF-010::Peter J. Wood Free Jazz Ensemble – Like Lions(2010, Cassette)
PF-011::Vomir – Untitled(2010, Cassette)
PF-012::Unearthed – Death Kiss(2010, Cassette)
PF-013::White Dog – The Harvestman(2010, Cassette)
PF-014::KkrakK! – Subatomic Vibrations(2010, Cassette)
PF-015::Dried Up Corpse – Death March(2010, Cassette)
PF-016::Greenhouse – Golden City(2010, Cassette)
PF-017::Fossils – Flame Disc Revisited(2010, Cassette)
PF-018::White Dog – Self Titled(2010, Cassette)
PF-019::Tom Carter – Numinous(2010, Cassette)
PF-020::Gremlynz // Ajilvsga – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-021::Dim Dusk Moving Gloom – Blinded by the Natty White(2010, Cassette)
PF-022::MSSNG // Greenhouse – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-023::Pink Priest // Horders – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-024::Gomeisa – Tourniquet(2010, Cassette)
PF-025::Jane Barbe // Akrotiri Poacher – Split(2011, Cassette)
PF-026::Kplr – Mechanical Mind Space b/w Mechanical Motion Simulator(2011, Cassette)
PF-027::Shiver – The Taste of Repent(2011, Cassette)
PF-028::Worker – Dream Dead(2011, Cassette)
PF-029::Black Hippies – Wicker House(2011, Cassette)
PF-030::White Dog – Resistance(2011, Cassette)
PF-031::Alms – Annihilation of the Self(2011, Cassette)
PF-032::Secret Girls – In Hiding(2011, Cassette)
PF-033::Mongst – Water Water Everywhere But Not a Drop to Drink(2011, Cassette)
PF-034::White Creeps – White Sleep(2011, Cassette)
PF-035::White Dog Family Band – Escape the Mystery II(2011, Cassette)
Dub Ditch Picnic Discography (to date)

1971.001::The Incinerators – The 90s Wuz Awesome(2010, Cassette)
1971.002::Art Muscle – No Emulsion(2010, Cassette)
1971.003::F.P. Tranquilizer vs. The Incinerators – (2010, Cassette)
1971.004::F.P. Tranquilizer – Summer Tape(2010, Cassette)
1971.005::Outer Spacist – Tape(2010, Cassette)
1971.006::No UFO’s – Mind Control(2010, Cassette)
1971.007::Krautheim – Mädchen auf der Rennbahn(2010, Cassette)
1971.008::Fletcher Pratt – Dub Sessions Vol. 1(2011, Cassette)
1971.009::xNoBBQx – Live @ Louie’s(2011, Cassette)
1971.010::Microdot – Lamps Not Amps(2011, Cassette)


Le label de cassette de Winnipeg, Prairie Fire Tapes et son morveux de petit frère, Dub Ditch Picnic pourrait être relativement nouveaux sur la scène, mais les deux ont revendiqué un place avec leur courant continu de sons tourneur de tête. Du pop modifié de Bill Northcott et ses multiples alias (F.P. Tranquilizer, The Incinerators, Microdot) vers des cogneurs plus lourds comme Fossils, Mongst and Worker, le favorit de Weird Canada Fletcher Pratt, l’ inclassifiable No UFO’s et bien plus, les co-fondateurs Chris Jacques (White Dog) et Cole Peters (Gomeisa, Secret Girls) sont entrain de couper leur propre morceau de la tarte. Nous avons parlé à Chris du passé, présent et futur de PFT et DDP.

Jesse Locke
Éditeur en chef
Weird Canada // Texture Magazine
http://weirdcanada.com // http://texturemagazine.ca/wordpress

Mongst – Negative Liberty

Secret Girls – Ten Thousand Winter

Fletcher Pratt – Weird Dub


1 :: comment avez-vous lance votre label et pourquoi? C.R.E.A.M.?

L’histoire commence en Janvier 2010 quand Prairie Fire Tapes a embarqué sur la scène. Cole Peters et moi parlions de faire sortir une cassette divisée. Nous avions distribué la charge de travail vers moi approvisionnant la cassette et la production et Cole faisait l’art et s’arrangeait pour les carte-j sois faites. Je pense qu’un jour après nous avons décidé de faire la cassette qu’on pensait, bien, essayons de faire un label. Après quelques mois, j’ai commencé à m’apercevoir que les groupes que je voulais travailler avec, je ne pouvais justifier d’avoir une partie du répertoire de PF. Alors, pour garder Prairie Fire concentré sur le bourdonnement, le bruit et l’expérimentalisme, j’ai lancé Dub Ditch Picnic en juin 2010. Les sorties de DDP reflétaient vraiment ma collection d’enregistrement—c’est plutôt vaste et varié. J’ai le rêve d’être capable de faire faire le saut des cassettes à un ou deux des labels seulement en pressant LPs dans la prochaine année ou à peu près. Mais un vinyle consomme pas mal de temps et mon temps et plutôt limité. Alors une fois que j’aurai complété quelques autres projets majeurs qui ont présentement mon attention, je vais jeter un œil pour faire sortir flopée d’enregistrements vraiment bizarres.

2 :: Jusqu’à maintenant, laquelle de vos sorties a été: a) la meilleure vente b) votre
préférée et c) la plus grande déception?

Les meilleures ventes furent toutes sur Prairie Fire— les cassettes de Tom Carter, Kplr, Worker,
et le Gomeisa se sont constamment envolé par les portes. Choisir ma favorite serait plus difficle—la cassette Solars était épatante. J’en ai encore des frissons quand je jam ça. La cassette de The Krautheim sur DDP devrait être une des préférés en tout temps. Ces gars ont tournés en un superbe enregistrement. Pas de déception vraiment. Il y a eu quelques sorties qui n’ont pas résonnées avec le peuple pour une raison ou une autre. Prenez la dernière fournée de cassettes de PF. Je pense que toutes les cinq sont solides– Alms, White Dog, Secret Girls, Mongst, et White Creeps.
Nous avons mis ceux la sur le marché au même temps que la grève de la poste et nous avons eu de la misère à les mettre entre les mains des gens. La plus grande déception est de faire sortir un super enregistrement pour un public désintéressé. Je ne fut pas déçu par aucun des artistes avec lesquels nous avons travaillé. Je me tiens debout derrière chacune des cassettes que nous avons faites.

3 :: Qu’est-ce qui vous différencie des autres labels? De la musique, de l’art, des livrets, des reluisant 8.5’’ x 11’’ et des photos?

La direction de l’art, le design et notre approche pour faire la cassette qui sonne aussi bien que possible nous différencient des autres labels. J’achète beaucoup de trucs et la plupart sur cassette. Je me sens vraiment délaissé quand j’obtiens une cassette qui fut piteusement maîtrisée ou dupliquée avec plus de sifflement que de musique. J’ai approvisionné quelques duplicateurs professionnels de qualité avec aussi quelques platines supérieures pour l’apprentissage. J’observe tout au long du procédé pour m’assurer que les cassettes sonnent comme elles le devraient. J’ai refais quelques voyages parce que cette cassette était trop silencieuse ou avait trop de sifflement ou peu importe. Nous sommes des musiciens et des fans de musique— nous traitons nos groupes et nous clients comme nous voudrions être traités.

4 :: Des plans futurs? Qu’est-ce que des saisisseurs peuvent avoir hâte de saisir?
Sur Prairie Fire nous avons mis en place des sorties avec Misner Space, Sundrips et une cassette complète de Horders. Dub Ditch a travaillé sur quelques compositions, une de la nouvelle musique clandestine de Finlandaise et de Nouvelle-Zélande. Nous sommes aussi dans au milieu de la fabrication d’experts pour une sortie de Auntie Dada/Preanderthals, une rétrospective de Velvet Chrome, une cassette de Shaker Hymns et le nouvel enregistrement par DJ Co-Op/Tim Hoover.

5 :: Kim Mitchell vs. Randy Bachman?
Je suis un mec de prairie pure et dur. Alors même si Vinyl Tap est le pire spectacle de radio qui soit, Randy B. à tout coup.

Fire Tapes Discography (à date)
PF-001::White Dog // Gomeisa – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-002::Art Muscle // no Rgans – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-003::Repulsive Bile – Emetophilia(2010, Cassette)
PF-004::Solars – Mist(2010, Cassette)
PF-005::White Dog – Retribution(2010, Cassette)
PF-006::Museums of Sleep – Self Titled(2010, Cassette)
PF-007::Pretty Princess // Secret Girls –Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-008::White Dog – Holodomor(2010, Cassette)
PF-009::Gomeisa – Blossoming Flesh(2010, Cassette)
PF-010::Peter J. Wood Free Jazz Ensemble –Like Lions(2010, Cassette)
PF-011::Vomir – Untitled(2010, Cassette)
PF-012::Unearthed – Death Kiss(2010, Cassette)
PF-013::White Dog – The Harvestman(2010, Cassette)
PF-014::KkrakK! – Subatomic Vibrations(2010, Cassette)
PF-015::Dried Up Corpse – Death March(2010, Cassette)
PF-016::Greenhouse – Golden City(2010, Cassette)
PF-017::Fossils – Flame Disc Revisited(2010, Cassette)
PF-018::White Dog – Self Titled(2010, Cassette)
PF-019::Tom Carter – Numinous(2010, Cassette)
PF-020::Gremlynz // Ajilvsga – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-021::Dim Dusk Moving Gloom – Blinded by the Natty White(2010, Cassette)
PF-022::MSSNG // Greenhouse – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-023::Pink Priest // Horders – Split(2010, Cassette)
PF-024::Gomeisa – Tourniquet(2010, Cassette)
PF-025::Jane Barbe // Akrotiri Poacher –Split(2011, Cassette)
PF-026::Kplr – Mechanical Mind Space b/w Mechanical Motion Simulator(2011, Cassette)
PF-027::Shiver – The Taste of Repent(2011, Cassette)
PF-028::Worker – Dream Dead(2011, Cassette)
PF-029::Black Hippies – Wicker House(2011, Cassette)
PF-030::White Dog – Resistance(2011, Cassette)
PF-031::Alms – Annihilation of the Self(2011, Cassette)
PF-032::Secret Girls – In Hiding(2011, Cassette)
PF-033::Mongst – Water Water Everywhere But Not a Drop to Drink(2011, Cassette)
PF-034::White Creeps – White Sleep(2011, Cassette)
PF-035::White Dog Family Band – Escape the Mystery II(2011, Cassette)

Dub Ditch Picnic Discography (to date)
1971.001::The Incinerators – The 90s Wuz Awesome(2010, Cassette)
1971.002::Art Muscle – No Emulsion(2010, Cassette)
1971.003::F.P. Tranquilizer vs. The Incinerators – (2010, Cassette)
1971.004::F.P. Tranquilizer – Summer Tape(2010, Cassette)
1971.005::Outer Spacist – Tape(2010, Cassette)
1971.006::No UFO’s – Mind Control(2010, Cassette)
1971.007::Krautheim – Mädchen auf der Rennbahn(2010, Cassette)
1971.008::Fletcher Pratt – Dub Sessions Vol. 1(2011, Cassette)
1971.009::xNoBBQx – Live @ Louie’s(2011, Cassette)
1971.010::Microdot – Lamps Not Amps(2011, Cassette)

Imprint :: Unit Structure Sound Recordings (USSR)

IMPRINT is a new feature on Weird Canada, shining the spotlight on record labels and the minds behind the music. First on the docket is Unit Structure Sound Recordings (USSR), a Calgary and Vancouver-based CD-R/cassette label specializing in the outer limits of avant-rock, free jazz, ambient synth travelers and other left-field sounds. We lined up five questions for founder Whitney Ota, plus a complete discography to date and a few preview tracks from upcoming releases.

Jesse Locke
Managing Editor
Weird Canada / Texture Magazine

Yankee Yankee – Outsiders

Family Studies – Limited Express

Haunted Beard – Video Deathbed


1 :: How did you launch your label and why? C.R.E.A.M.?
Some friends and I have been in various bands for a few years now, which started out as weirdo improv type stuff for the most part. I went to school for recording arts and would record all our jams. The band Natural formed when Carter Gilchrist, Matthew Read and I played together for the first time years ago, which ended up being hours of piercing noise. Sometimes it got weird, starting up almost religious rituals reminiscent of the fantastic Nat Pwe ceremonies as documented by Sublime Frequencies. Check those recordings out if you get a chance.
We started talking about a record label and putting out the Natural jams as a 10CD boxset and the first thing on the label. We wanted to do something different. Eventually, we let that idea go, thinking it was maybe a bit ambitious. Yet we started the label regardless, as a means of releasing our own stuff all under one name, but also as a catalyst for being able to say that a certain piece of work is complete. This is something difficult for all of us to come to grips with. It just made sense that it be a kind of collective, as our circle of friends had most of the necessary skills and tools to be able to make the label work. We are all record nerd types that have the same sorts of values – experimentation and amazing art/packaging. The label is run by: Carter Gilchrist, Matthew Read, Joe Smiglicki, James Nakagawa, Brian Arden and Whitney Ota.
2 :: To date, which of your releases has been: a) the best-seller, b) your favourite and c) the biggest bummer?
I think the Yankee Yankee – Best of the Early Recordings album has been the best seller so far, but it has also been out the longest. Either that or the PIXXX label compilation because its free, but I’m not sure if that counts. We have a few releases scheduled for early 2011 that will no-doubt shatter any sales we’ve seen so far. Our stuff is not always the easiest sale, as it is mostly psych/weird/minimal/droning/spastic/noisy/etc. However, we’ve been really lucky getting a lot of help from great people at record shops, radio stations and zines in the promotional aspects of the label. Also having other friends that run labels, or have put out their share of music have been great resources – so thanks! We’ve been lucky to have so much support so far.
My favourite releases are things that haven’t come out yet. I’ve been getting really excited for the newHaunted Beard which will be coming out in a clear DVD package featuring Ben Jacques’ insane artwork. Also, the new Family Studies album that we recorded at my studio (Canopy Sound Studio) in Calgary is sounding so good! Carter and Matt (from Family Studies) are putting the final touches on it in their studio in Vancouver’s downtown East Side. I’m also trying to find out how much a vinyl release would set us back as I am hoping to do the newest Yankee Yankee album on vinyl, which would be a first for Unit Structure!
So far none of the releases have been a bummer. They’ve all been so much fun to work on. We get so excited any time we have a new release!
3 :: What sets you apart from other labels? Music, art, liner notes, posters, glossy 8.5” x 11” headshots?
I think there are lots of labels doing similar things. I guess the one thing that sets us apart is the music. I’ve always felt that improvisation is a huge part of the label’s sound, yet it’s very difficult to stylize. I feel like improvisation is your most honest feeling coming out of you, and therefore these sounds are us by definition.
We try to package things as interestingly as possible, as packaging has been a big influence in starting up the label. We look up to labels who have set the bar with packaging, Isolated Now Waves, Not Not Fun, Type Records or Stunned Records to name a few – anyone who puts in the extra mile in terms of their artwork. Even re-issue labels like Dust to Digital or countless others.
4 :: Future plans? What can grippers look forward to gripping?
We are going to keep up with the releases. We’ve been putting out almost one a month since we started up (11 releases so far in just over a year) with many more planned. We want to play more shows – maybe even a tour here and there. We’ll see. I’d like to get our stuff into record stores outside of Calgary and Vancouver.
We have so much coming out soon!
– Family Studies – Album title TBA (Recorded at Canopy Sound, unpredictable and surprising, fast ‘n’ bulbous, tight also)
– Dundas – Explorer Series vol 1 & 2 (Two cassettes of field recordings, destroyed upon playback, from serene to harsh without a moment’s notice)
– Yankee Yankee – Album title TBA (Cassette of two side-length synth-based drones featuring some textural guitar work, lose yourself in these)
– Yankee Yankee – Album title TBA (format to be confirmed, but possibly our first vinyl release. 11 tracks of ecstatic drone)
– Various – PIXXX 2 (annual label compilation, included with the first ever Unit Structure art zine. The theme is “Structure”)
– C-130 (sparse electronic beats with some tense sounding layers)
– The Church of Jeffrey Adams – Circus Bukkake (SLAM-BANG-ZOWEE XXX CARTOON ACTION)
Lots of other stuff in early stages as well. Expect releases from Country & Western, The Church of Jeffrey Adams, Natural and maybe a few new bands to the label. Who knows? 2011 has just begun!
5 :: Kim Mitchell vs. Randy Bachman?
I vote Max Webster. The first album was probably the best. Matthew Read (Natural/PoLPOT/Wild & Majestic/Church of Jeffrey Adams/Castle Excellent/Family Studies) says, “Randy Bachman, without a doubt.”

USSR Discography (to date)
USSR00CD::Various Artists – PIXXX(2010, Compact Disc)
USR001CD::Yankee Yankee – Best of the Early Recordings(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR002/003CD::Natural/PoLPOT – 2CD Split Album(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR004CD::Wild & Majestic – Two Lone Swordsmen(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR005CD::Yankee Yankee – Resting Star(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR006CS::The Church of Jeffrey Adams – Dirty Snatch(2010, Cassette)
USSR007CS::The Church of Jeffrey Adams – We Want Your Daughters(2010, Cassette)
USSR008CS::The Church of Jeffrey Adams – 12 Hymns By Gentlemen of Leisure(2011, Cass.)
USSR009CD::Castle Excellent – Silver Salad of the Moon(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR010CD::Family Studies – Life Cycles Volume 1: Sexy Creeper(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR011CD::Family Studies – Life Cycles Volume 2: Density Master(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR012CD::Haunted Beard – Video Deathbed(2011, Compact Disc)
USSR013CD::Family Studies – Life Cycles Volume 3: Torch of Heuristics(2011, Compact Disc)

Du pas lourd discographique de Jesse Locke:
IMPRINT est une nouvelle présentation sur Weird Canada. Faisant briller les feux du projecteur sur les labels d’enregistrement et les esprits derrière la musique. En premier sur l’étiquette se trouve Unit Structure Sound Recordings (USSR), un label de CD-R/cassette de Calgary et Vancouver se spécialisant dans les limites externes de l’avant rock, le jazz libre, les voyageurs de synth ambiante et d’autres sons du champ de gauche. Nous avons aligné cinq questions pour la fondatrice, Whitney Ota, plus une discographie complète à jour et quelques aperçus de pistes des sorties qui arrivent.

Jesse Locke
Éditeur en chef
Weird Canada / Texture Magazine
weirdcanada.com / texturemagazine.ca/wordpress

Yankee Yankee – Outsiders

Family Studies – Limited Express

Haunted Beard – Video Deathbed


1:: Comment avez-vous lancé votre label et pourquoi? C.R.E.A.M.?
Quelques amis et moi-même avons été dans plusieurs groupes pour quelques années maintenant, lesquels avaient commencé comme du type d’impro bizarre truc pour la majorité. Je suis allé à l’école pour enregistrer des arts et j’enregistrais tout nos jams. Le groupe Natural s’est formé quand Carter Gilchrist, Matthiew Read et moi jouions ensembles pour la première fois, il y a de cela des années, ce qui ce termina en des heures de bruits perçants. Parfois, ça devenait bizarre, commençant presque comme des rituels religieux rappelant les fantastiques cérémonies de Nat Pwe documentées par Sublime Frequencies. Allez voir ces enregistrements si vous en avez la chance. Nous avons commencé à parler d’un label d’enregistrement et publié les jams de Natural sous forme d’un coffret de 10CD et la première chose sur le label. Nous voulions faire quelque chose de différent. Éventuellement, nous avons laissé aller cette idée, pensant que c’était peut-être un peu ambitieux. Toutefois, nous avons commencé le label malgré tout, comme moyen de faire sortir nos propre trucs, tous sous un nom, mais aussi comme un déclencheur pour être capable de dire qu’une certaine partie du travail était complète. C’est quelque chose de difficile pour nous tous de venir à bout de faire ça. Ça faisait juste du sens que ce soit un genre de collectif, alors que notre cercle d’amis avait la plupart des capacités et outils nécessaires pour être capable de faire fonctionner le label. Nous sommes tous des types d’intello d’enregistrement qui ont le même genre de valeurs—l’expérimentation et un art/ enveloppage superbe. Le label est dirigé par : Carter Gilchrist, Matthew Read, Joe Smiglicki, James Nakagawa, Brian Arden et Whitney Ota.
2:: Jusqu’à maintenant, laquelle de vos sorties a été: a) la meilleure vente b) votre préférée et c) la plus grosse déception?
Je pense que Yankee Yankee—le meilleur album des Early Recordings a été la meilleurs vente jusqu’à maintenant, mais c’est aussi celui qui a été sorti le plus longtemps. C’est soit ça ou le label PIXXX de compilation parce que c’est gratuit, mais je ne suis pas certain que ça compte. Nous avons quelques sorties de prévues pour début 2011 qui vont sans aucun doute fracasser toutes ventes que nous avons vues jusqu’à maintenant. Notre truc n’est pas toujours le plus facile à vendre, comme c’est majoritairement du psych/bizarre/bourdonnant/spasmodique/bruyant/ etc. Cependant, nous avons été très chanceux d’avoir beaucoup d’aide de gens super dans les magasins d’enregistrement, les stations radio et les magazines dans l’aspect promotionnel du label. Aussi, avoir beaucoup d’autres amis qui font des labels, ou ont publié leur part de musique furent de grandes ressources—alors merci! Nous avons été chanceux d’avoir tellement de support jusqu’à maintenant. Mes sorties préférées sont des choses qui n’ont pas encore sorties. J’ai été vraiment excité pour le nouveau Haunted Beard lequel va sortir dans un clair emballage de DVD présentant l’œuvre folle de Ben Jacques. Aussi, le nouvel album de Family Studies que nous avons enregistré dans mon studio (Canopy Sound Studio) à Calgary sonne vraiment bien! Carter et Matt (de Family Studies) font des touches finales sur celui-ci dans leur studio au centre-ville East Side de Vancouver. J’essais aussi de trouver à quel point une sortie de vinyle nous replacerait comme j’espère faire avec le nouvel album de Yankee Yankee sur vinyle, lequel serait une première pour Unit Structure! Jusqu’à maintenant, aucune des sorties fu tune déception. Elles ont toutes été tellement amusante à faire. Nous devenons si excités à toutes les fois que nous avons une nouvelle mise en vente!
3 :: Qu’est-ce qui vous différencie des autres labels? De la musique, de l’art, des livrets, des affiches, de reluisant 8.5’’ x 11’’ et des photos?
Je pense qu’il y a beaucoup de labels qui font des choses semblables, Je présume que la chose qui nous différencie c’est la musique. J’ai toujours senti que l’improvisation est une grosse partie du son du label, mais c’est encore très difficile à styler. Je sens que l’improvisation est votre sentiment le plus honnête sortant de vous et dans ce cas, ces sons sont nous par définition. Nous essayons d’emballer les choses de façon autant intéressante que possible, comme l’emballage a été une grosse influence pour commencer le label. Nous avons du respect pour les labels qui ont placé la barre pour l’emballage, Isolated Now Waves, Not Not Fun, Type Records or Stunned Records pour en nommer quelques uns—n’importe qui, qui fait les kilomètres d’extra en termes de leur œuvre. Même les labels re-publiés comme Dust to Digital et d’innombrables autres.
4 :: Des plans futurs? Qu’est-ce que les saisisseurs peuvent avoir hâte de saisir?
Nous allons maintenir les sorties. Nous avons en avons presque sortie une par mois depuis que nous avons commencé (11 sorties jusqu’à maintenant en simplement une année) avec beaucoup plus de planifiées. Nous voulons faire plus de spectacles—peut-être même une tournée ici et là. Nous verrons. J’aimerais placé nos trucs dans les magasins d’enregistrements hors de Calgary et Vancouver.
Nous avons tellement de chose qui s’en viennent bientôt!
– Family Studies – Titre de l’album TBA ( Enregistré à Canopy Sound, imprévisible et surprenant, vite et bulbeux, serré aussi)
– Dundas – Explorer Series vol 1 & 2 (Deux cassettes d’enregistrements de champ, détruits sur des re-lectures, de serein à dure sans préavis)
– Yankee Yankee – Album title TBA (Cassette de deux côtés de longueur de drones basés sur des synth présentant quelconque travail de guitar texture, perdez-vous dans ceux-là.)
– Yankee Yankee – Album title TBA (format à être confirmé, mais possiblement notre première sortie en vinyle. 11 pistes debourdonnement ecstatiques. )
– Various – PIXXX 2 (Compilation de label annuel, inclus avec le tout premier magazine d’Art de Unit Structure)
– C-130 (de rare battements électroniques avec quelques couches à l’air tendues.)
– The Church of Jeffrey Adams – Circus Bukkake (SLAM-BANG-ZOWEE XXX CARTOON ACTION)
Lots of other stuff in early stages as well. Expect releases from Country & Western, The Church of Jeffrey Adams, Natural and maybe a few new bands to the label. Who knows? 2011 has just begun!
Un tapon d’autres trucs dans les premières étapes aussi. Attendez vous à des sorties de Country et Western, The Church, Jeffrey Adams, Natural et peut-être quelques nouveaux groupes au label. Qui sait? 2011 vient juste de commencé!
5 :: Kim Mitchell vs. Randy Bachman?
Je vote Max Webster. Le premier album était probablement le meilleur. Matthew Read (Natural/PoLPOT/Wild & Majestic/Church of Jeffrey Adams/Castle Excellent/Family Studies) sit: ‘’Randy Bachman sans aucun doute.’’

USSR Discography (jusqu’à maintenant)
USSR00CD::Various Artists – PIXXX(2010, Compact Disc)
USR001CD::Yankee Yankee – Best of the Early Recordings(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR002/003CD::Natural/PoLPOT – 2CD Split Album(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR004CD::Wild & Majestic – Two Lone Swordsmen(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR005CD::Yankee Yankee – Resting Star(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR006CS::The Church of Jeffrey Adams – Dirty Snatch(2010, Cassette)
USSR007CS::The Church of Jeffrey Adams – We Want Your Daughters(2010, Cassette)
USSR008CS::The Church of Jeffrey Adams – 12 Hymns By Gentlemen of Leisure(2011, Cass.)
USSR009CD::Castle Excellent – Silver Salad of the Moon(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR010CD::Family Studies – Life Cycles Volume 1: Sexy Creeper(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR011CD::Family Studies – Life Cycles Volume 2: Density Master(2010, Compact Disc)
USSR012CD::Haunted Beard – Video Deathbed(2011, Compact Disc)
USSR013CD::Family Studies – Life Cycles Volume 3: Torch of Heuristics(2011, Compact Disc)