Tag: elliot lake

Imprint :: Amok Recordings

Amok_Recordings-weirdcanada_photo-web.jpg

The sonorous expanse that is Toronto’s artistic vestibule is speckled with independent start-up labels, each orbiting uniquely around the city’s cache of raw talent. In this voluminous climate, Justin Scott Gray, founder of Amok Recordings, is attuned to the ‘global character’ of Canada’s do-it-yourself and do-it-together musical landscape.

Creative collaboration between projects emerges as a new language, the semiotics of which —- given the prominence of talent and people motivated in providing it with a collective roof —- speak to the ever loudening typologies that strengthen the presence of our northernly crucibles. It is here, in this space of global cross-pollination, that Amok Recordings has established itself as a progenitor of music that navigates across borders, both geographically and stylistically speaking. We spoke to the founder of the Toronto via Elliot Lake experimental label about Amok’s birth, evolution and ongoing communication.

Bleepus Chris – Stalker

Jay Morritt – Love You More Than I Miss You

Justin Scott Gray – Octatactics

RCL Commission – Been Out In The Field Too Long

 

Joshua Robinson: How did Amok start? What was the creative push behind the inception of the imprint? Did it begin as a way for you to share your own music?

Justin Scott Gray: Amok “officially” began in June 2006. However, the imprint name dates back to around 2000 (appearing on various CD-r releases but without a real organization behind it). When Amok was first conceived, it aimed to serve several purposes:

  1. to create a free online archive for limited edition and out-of-print releases
  2. to present digital music in a way that felt like it was part of the overall package (as opposed to just some text on archive.org)
  3. to invite other like-minded artists from around the world to present their work in a similar way
  4. to become more of an arts-collective rather than a label (note: there used to be a ‘visual arts’ section on the website and we would showcase portfolios)

As you grow, your inspiration obviously changes… For the last few years we have been focusing more on new releases and selling physical packages, rather than just archiving old material via free download. I guess the short answer to your question is yes – it began partly as a way to present the music that I was involved in.

You recently returned to Toronto from Elliot Lake, Ontario. Can you comment on how these geographic spaces influenced you differently?

<<< read more >>>

Elliot Lake is a pretty depressing place… It began as a booming uranium mine town. Then, in the early ’90s, all of the mining companies closed. With a crippled economy, the city council moved quickly to create a for-profit company (comprised of the mayor and most of the councillors) and they re-branded the city after their new company name: “Retirement Living”. They inherited tons of liquidated cottage-homes from the former mine companies and started busing-in pensioners to fill the homes and pay the taxes.

So in comparison with Toronto (where there are actually people under the age of 65), it’s a lot different! As far as the influence goes… The lack of culture really made me want to create something.

Micro-independents and DIY labels seem to be incredibly prevalent, especially in the major hubs such as Toronto, which is home to Amok. Can you comment on what it is about the creative ethos of Toronto that makes it such a hot-spot for labels and musicians alike?

Yeah – Bandcamp alone seems to have spawned hundreds of new labels. Not being facetious but it’s probably just the sheer density of people that makes Toronto a “hot-spot”… I think that with the way technology has evolved, pretty much anyone, anywhere, can make a label. You really don’t have to be in a big city to do it! There’s just more people there doing it.

Your releases seem to cover the spectrum of physical mediums quite well. However, there seems to be a bit of a preference for cassette. What does the cassette medium mean to you?

Well, it is an analog format and every release that we put out has a digital counterpart… Personally, I like comparing the sound of the digital vs. the analog… I also like that it has two sides because this can really influence the way an artist works. I know that when I was making my last solo record Adult Music I really focused on the two-side format. I’ve also read articles about what it means to some other people. A few have noted that cassette culture is a “rebellion in the face of the iPhone generation,” while others chalk it up to plain nostalgia. It’s probably a bit of everything. I would release music on all formats, if I could afford it.

Stylistically, your catalogue and the musicians who you have worked with are incredibly diverse. Is the strength of the electronic, ambient, and experimental communities in Toronto a reason for the prevalence of the genres on your imprint?

To be honest, I have no idea what’s been going in Toronto… Like I said, I’ve been in Elliot Lake for the past few months and before that I was in Sarnia (which is as equally depressing as Elliot Lake). Also, we don’t have any other Toronto artists involved with the label (except JEFFTHEWORLD, but he makes chiptune and that’s a whole culture unto itself). The label catalogue is pretty much just music that I personally find interesting and that I think would fit together in some strange way. I don’t really focus on any given geographic location and I tend to work with people that I just think are genuine.

Collaboration between artists under the Amok imprint seems to be a pretty important point of distinction for your label. Why is cross-pollination between creative projects important to you?

I think that when someone is being genuine they are likely just “doing-what-they-do”, and so if you set up a network of people who “do-music” then it just makes sense that collaborations will happen… I have always found it interesting how a specific artist can act like an ingredient in a new recipe. And, as a fan, I’ve always enjoyed dissecting music and imagining what a particular artist might be adding to any given project (it becomes even more interesting once you know a particular artist’s body of work).

There is some branching out of Amok to work with musicians residing beyond Canada. Can you comment on how this ‘global’ character might distinguish Amok from other Toronto-based imprints? What international communities have you been able to develop working relationships with?

It’s funny because I know that Weird Canada has some strict guidelines for only covering Canadian artists, and as we discussed, much of the catalogue is comprised of releases by artists from other countries… Dare I say that this aspect of Amok is perhaps what makes us even more Canadian than your average label? Melting Pot 101.

Seriously though, I don’t feel connected to any particular city. Yes, we’re Canadian. And yes, we’re currently in Toronto. But that doesn’t matter… We could still be surrounded by the elderly folks of Elliot Lake and the label would continue in the same way. That probably sets us apart from other Toronto labels.

We’ve put out releases by artists from six countries and really created some strong networks in both France (Strasbourg) and the United States (Los Angeles). In France, I have been working with Nicolas Boutines who has brought us several amazing projects including his own collaborations with Pascal Gully (who has released music on John Zorn’s Tzadik label). In LA, I have been working with Jean-Paul Garnier. He is an extremely hard-working and very talented sound artist who has connected us with many other artists and organizations within the U.S. He’s even released the work of some Amok artists on his Welcome To The 21st net label.

Canada is a bellowing breeding ground for DIY and independent musicians and record imprints. What is it about the creative climate of Canada that inspires and facilitates this sort of artistic fervour?

I’m not sure what it is. If we’re talking specifically about “the industry“ then maybe it’s because of how spoiled we are as Canadians. A LOT of releases seem to have FACTOR or various Arts Council logos on them. There’s so much incentive for young people to ”take a couple of years off of school, start an indie band and hit the road for a while.” I’m a little jealous because we have had zero funding and it’s been an uphill battle.

One final question: Do you have any upcoming releases that you are particularly excited about?

I’m still pretty excited about the Ross Chait album that we just put out. As for upcoming releases, we’re getting ready to put out a new Somnaphon tape/CD and I’m really thrilled that he’s going to be a part of the label. His work is VERY interesting. FYI: he also runs his own label, Bicephalic Records, which is definitely worth checking out!

Amok Recordings Discography (to-date):

2013

Ross Wallace Chait – Routine Symptoms
Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 3
the One (family) – the One (family)
Ross Wallace Chait & loopool – Digressive Generation
Debbie Gaines – HORTUS (rappel libre!)
b.burroughs – Paraded And Thus; My Hair Has Held All The Smells Of Your Body
Canti – Gale Warning For Lake Superior EP
the One (family) – Live @ SOMETHINGseries

2012

mic&rob – Archi Cons (suite)
Justin Scott Gray – All In Time
Cathartech – Disquietudes
USB Orchestra – Phase One (2005-2009)
b.burroughs – *sniper function(bodily)
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 2
Justin Scott Gray – My New Synth
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass The Bugs And The Breeze
Justin Scott Gray – Segue Heil
Debbie Gaines – Mirror, Mirror
loopool – Wears A Golden Hat
Jay Morritt – No Good Times
mic&rob – Live And Let Lie
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume III
JEFFTHEWORLD – Disc+
EKT – EKT

2011

Chevalier – Heart and Soul (Ambient Communications Vol. 2)
Justin Scott Gray – In Audible
loopool – *Looks To Feudalism: the One (family) – C.$’ta
the One (family) – Sprout_Tiers
b.burroughs – bayis, sweet…

2010

NILL – Meeba
Rion C – Live In The Chemical Valley
t h i e f – Expedition
Chevalier – O.S. V1: Ambient Communications
t h i e f – REC.
This Is Esophagus – Love, What Is

2009

James Provencher – Bird Calls Home In Time For Christmas
This Is Esophagus – Terra Firma EP
Brother’s Pus – A Mirror To Fool An Audience For A Play An Audience To Fool A Mirror For A Play
James Provencher – AM Radio
James Provencher – Five Miles To God’s Country
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume II
USB Orchestra – Slaves
James Provencher – Poverty-Line Assault
P*Taz – Ituri EP

2008

USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume I
Bad Bolster Boycott – Margarita EP
Lights Streaming Through The Sounds – Sunrise EP
USB Orchestra – I am ok
Polymath – Polymath EP

2006

Dead Seed Recordings – From Our Heart Will Flow Rivers Of Living Water
USB Orchestra – Pentuhtook
A-Mo & Amplifier Machine – Y’all Fatties Come Chew Some Freedom!
RCL Commission – RCL Commission
Bleepus Christ – Nature
Bleepus Christ – Merry Christmas, Jesus Christ
USB Orchestra – Be Free.
Bleepus Christ – Listen-In Amplifier
Bleepus Christ – bye, mean.

L’immensité sonore qu’est le vestibule artistique de Toronto est parsemée d’étiquettes indépendantes toutes neuves, chacune orbitant de manière unique autour de la ville bouillant de talent. Plongé dans ce volumineux climat, Justin Scott Gray, le fondateur d’Amok Recordings, est accoutumé à la disposition générale pour le fait-maison et le travail d’équipe harmonieux qui régit le paysage musical canadien.

De la collaboration créative entre projets émerge un nouveau langage, une sémantique qui – étant donné l’afflux de talents et de gens motivés à offrir un toit collectif – parle aux typologies de plus en plus présentes, celles qui renforcent la présence de nos creusets nordiques. C’est ici, au centre de cet espace de pollinisation croisée, qu’Amok Recordings s’est établi comme progéniteur de musique qui navigue au-delà des frontières, autant géographiques que stylistiques. Nous avons parlé avec le fondateur de l’étiquette expérimentale, en provenance de Toronto via Elliot Lake, de sa naissance, de son évolution et de sa constante communication.

Bleepus Chris – Stalker

Jay Morritt – Love You More Than I Miss You

Justin Scott Gray – Octatactics

RCL Commission – Been Out In The Field Too Long

 

Joshua Robinson: Comment Amok a-t-il démarré? Quelle était la poussée créative derrière la mise en place de l’étiquette? Est-ce que cela a commencé comme une façon de partager ta propre musique?

Justin Scott Gray: Amok a démarré ‘’officiellement’’ en juin 2006. Par contre, le nom de l’étiquette date plutôt de 2000 (il apparait sur différentes publications de CD-r sans réelle organisation derrière lui). Quand Amok à démarré, c’était dans le but de servir plusieurs objectifs:

  1. Créer une archive en ligne pour les éditions limitées et les sorties en rupture de stock
  2. Présenter la musique en format digital de manière à ce qu’elle semble faire partie de l’ensemble (et non comme seulement du texte sur archive.org)
  3. Inviter des artistes aux points de vues/intérêtes similaires à partager leur travail selon un canevas similaire
  4. Devenir un collectif artistique plutôt qu’une étiquette (note: Auparavant, il y avait une section ‘Arts visuels’ sur le site où nous partagions des portfolios.)

En grandissant, l’inspiration change… Au cours des dernières années, nous nous sommes concentré de plus en plus sur les nouvelles sorties et les paquets physiques à vendre au lieu de seulement alimenter nos archives avec des téléchargements gratuits. Je pense que la réponse courte à la question est oui – cela à commencé en partie comme une façon de partager mes propres projets.

Tu es récemment revenu à Toronto après avoir habité à Elliot Lake, en Ontario. Peux-tu partager de quelles manières ces espaces géographiques t’ont influencé?

Elliot Lake est un endroit assez déprimant… Ça s’est développé au départ avec les mines d’uranium. Pendant les années 90, toutes les compagnies minières ont plié bagage. Avec une économie précaire, la Ville s’est adapté et a créé un organisme à but lucratif (composé principalement du maire et de ses conseillés) et ils ont ensuite présenté la ville à l’aide de leur nouveau nom d’organisme: ‘Retirement Living’. Ils avaient hérité d’une tonne de maisons-chalets à bas prix des compagnies minières et ils ont commencé à convoyer plein de retraités dans ces maisons pour qu’elles soient habitées et rapportent des taxes.

<<< read more >>>

Alors, en comparaison avec Toronto (où il y a effectivement des gens de moins de 65 ans qui habitent), c’est vraiment différent! Puis, en ce qui concerne l’influence du lieu… l’absence de culture m’a vraiment donné envie de créer quelque chose.

Les mini-étiquettes indépendantes et fait-maison semblent incroyablement présentes, surtout dans les grands centres comme Toronto, d’où vient Amok. Peux-tu partager ce qui dans l’éthos créatif de Toronto rend les étiquettes et les artistes si prolifiques?

Oui – Bandcamp semble à lui seul avoir frayé le chemin à une centaine d’étiquettes. Sans être facétieux, c’est probablement la densité de population qui fait de Toronto un point si ‘chaud’. Je pense qu’avec la manière dont la technologie a évolué, pratiquement n’importe qui n’importe où peut démarrer une étiquette. Vous n’avez pas besoin d’être dans une grande ville pour le faire! Il y a seulement plus de gens qui le font dans ces endroits-là.

Tes sorties semblent couvrir très bien le large spèctre des copies physiques. Par contre, il semble y avoir une préférence pour la cassette. Qu’est ce que la cassette représente pour toi?

Eh bien, c’est un format analogique et chaque sortie que nous faisons a son équvalent numérique. Personnellement, j’aime comparer le son du numérique et de l’analogique… J’aime aussi le fait que la cassette a deux faces parce que ça peut grandement influencer la manière de travailler de l’artiste. Je sais que pendant que je travaillais sur mon dernier album solo Adult Music, je me suis vraiment concentré sur le format deux-faces. J’ai aussi lu des articles pour savoir quelle importance ce format a pour d’autres gens. Quelques personnes semblent penser que le culture de la cassette est une “rébellion contre la génération iPhone”, alors que d’autres l’associent à de la simple nostalgie. C’est probablement un peu de tout. Je sortirais de la musique sous tous les formats, si je pouvais me le permettre.

Le catalogue et les artistes avec lesquels tu choisis de travailler ont un style très diversifié. Est-ce que la force des scènes électronique, ambiante et expérimentale de Toronto sont responsables de leur abondance sur ton étiquette?

Pour être honnête, je n’ai aucune idée de ce qui se passe à Toronto…. Comme je le disais, j’ai passé les derniers mois à Elliot Lake et juste avant j’étais à Sarnia (qui est aussi déprimant qu’Elliot Lake). Aussi, nous n’avons pas d’autres artistes de Toronto qui font partie de l’étiquette (sauf JEFFTHEWORLD, mais il fait du chiptune et c’est vraiment une culture en soi). Le catalogue de l’étiquette est pas mal juste de la musique que je trouve intéressante et qui, je crois, peut former un tout cohérent, d’une certaine façon. Je ne pense pas beaucoup aux origines géographiques des artistes et je m’entoure en général de gens qui me semblent authentiques.

Les collaborations entre artistes d’Amok Recordings semblent être un élèment distinctif important pour l’étiquette. Pourquoi la pollinisation croisée entre projets créatifs est-elle si importante pour toi?

Je pense que quand les gens sont authentiques, ils font d’emblée “ce-qu’ils-ont-à-faire”, alors si on connecte ensemble une bande de gens qui font de la musique, les collaborations naissent d’elles-mêmes. J’ai toujours trouvé intéressant qu’un artiste en particulier puisse être l’ingrédient d’une nouvelle recette. Et, en tant que fan, j’ai toujours aimé disséquer la musique et imaginer ce qu’un artiste en particulier pourrait apporter à un projet (ça devient encore plus intéressant quand tu connais bien l’ensemble de l’oeuvre d’un artiste).

Il y a une ouverture chez Amok à travailler avec des musiciens résidant ailleurs qu’au Canada. Peux-tu nous dire comment cette caractéristque ‘globale’ pourrait permettre à Amok de se distinguer des autres étiquettes de Toronto? Avec quelles communautés internationales as-tu développé des liens?

C’est drôle parce que je sais à quel point c’est une ligne directrice importante de Weird Canada que de couvrir seulement du contenu canadien et, comme nous en avons discuté, une bonne partie du catalogue comprend des sorties d’artistes d’autres pays. Est-ce que je peux me permettre de dire que cet aspect d’Amok est peut-être ce qui nous rend encore plus canadien? Melting pop 101.

Sérieusement, je ne me sais pas connecté à une ville en particulier. Oui, nous sommes canadiens. Et oui, nous sommes présentement basés à Toronto. Mais ça n’a pas d’importance. Nous pourrions être entourés des aînés d’Elliot Lake et l’étiquette se comporterait de la même manière. C’est probablement ce qui nous différencie des autres étiquettes de Toronto.

Nous avons produit les albums d’artistes de six pays différents et avons créé des réseaux importants en France (Strasbourg) et aux États-Unis (Los Angeles). En France, j’ai travaillé avec Nicolas Boutines, qui nous a apporté plusieurs projets étonnants, incluant une de ses propres collaborations avec Pascal Gully (qui a sortie de la musique sur l’étiquette Tzadik de John Zorn). À Los Angeles, j’ai travaillé avec Jean-Paul Garnier. C’est un artiste du son qui travaille extrêmement fort, qui est bourré de talent, et qui a connecté avec plusieurs artistes et organisations aux États-Unis. Il a même publié le travail de quelques-uns des artistes d’Amok sur son label web, Welcome to the 21st.

Le Canada est le terrain d’un nombre incroyable de musiciens indépendants et d’étiquettes fait-maison. Qu’est-ce qui, dans ce climat créatif canadien, favorise et inspire si bien cette genre de ferveur artistique?

Je ne suis pas certain. Si nous parlons principalement de “l’industrie”, c’est peut-être parce que nous sommes si gâtés au Canada. BEAUCOUP d’albums semblent porter le logo de FACTOR ou du Conseil des Arts. Les jeunes sont tellement incités à ‘’prendre une année sabbatique ou deux, à créer un groupe de musique et à partir en tournée un temps”. Je suis un peu jaloux parce que nous n’avons eu aucun financement et que ça a été une longue bataille.

Une dernière question: Y a-t-il une publication prochaine qui t’excites particulièrement?

Je suis encore très excité par l’album de Ross Chait qu’on vient de sortir. Pour les publications à venir, nous sommes en train de préparer la sortie d’un nouveau Somnaphon en format cassette/CD et je suis très content qu’il fasse partie de notre étiquette. Son travail est VRAIMENT intéressant. Pour votre info: Il a aussi sa propre étiquette, Bicephalic Records, qui vaut vraiment le détour!

La discographie d’Amok Recordings (à ce jour)

2013

Ross Wallace Chait – Routine Symptoms
Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 3
the One (family) – the One (family)
Ross Wallace Chait & loopool – Digressive Generation
Debbie Gaines – HORTUS (rappel libre!)
b.burroughs – Paraded And Thus; My Hair Has Held All The Smells Of Your Body
Canti – Gale Warning For Lake Superior EP
the One (family) – Live @ SOMETHINGseries

2012

mic&rob – Archi Cons (suite)
Justin Scott Gray – All In Time
Cathartech – Disquietudes
USB Orchestra – Phase One (2005-2009)
b.burroughs – *sniper function(bodily)
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 2
Justin Scott Gray – My New Synth
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass The Bugs And The Breeze
Justin Scott Gray – Segue Heil
Debbie Gaines – Mirror, Mirror
loopool – Wears A Golden Hat
Jay Morritt – No Good Times
mic&rob – Live And Let Lie
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume III
JEFFTHEWORLD – Disc+
EKT – EKT

2011

Chevalier – Heart and Soul (Ambient Communications Vol. 2)
Justin Scott Gray – In Audible
loopool – *Looks To Feudalism: the One (family) – C.$’ta
the One (family) – Sprout_Tiers
b.burroughs – bayis, sweet…

2010

NILL – Meeba
Rion C – Live In The Chemical Valley
t h i e f – Expedition
Chevalier – O.S. V1: Ambient Communications
t h i e f – REC.
This Is Esophagus – Love, What Is

2009

James Provencher – Bird Calls Home In Time For Christmas
This Is Esophagus – Terra Firma EP
Brother’s Pus – A Mirror To Fool An Audience For A Play An Audience To Fool A Mirror For A Play
James Provencher – AM Radio
James Provencher – Five Miles To God’s Country
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume II
USB Orchestra – Slaves
James Provencher – Poverty-Line Assault
P*Taz – Ituri EP

2008

USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume I
Bad Bolster Boycott – Margarita EP
Lights Streaming Through The Sounds – Sunrise EP
USB Orchestra – I am ok
Polymath – Polymath EP

2006

Dead Seed Recordings – From Our Heart Will Flow Rivers Of Living Water
USB Orchestra – Pentuhtook
A-Mo & Amplifier Machine – Y’all Fatties Come Chew Some Freedom!
RCL Commission – RCL Commission
Bleepus Christ – Nature
Bleepus Christ – Merry Christmas, Jesus Christ
USB Orchestra – Be Free.
Bleepus Christ – Listen-In Amplifier
Bleepus Christ – bye, mean.

How To Start A Music Blog When You’re 15

How To Start A Music Blog When You're 15

You are young. You live in a depressed post-boom retirement town. You have discovered CBC Radio, and find your late nights filled with soft static and international programming. Along with this discovery blooms a whole new world of music – Canadian music – that you’ve never heard before. You want to talk about it. You want everyone to know about it. You want to be a part of it. In an interweb world of infinite opinions, visions and sounds, you decide you have a voice. You start a blog:

1. Research

Research different blogging platforms before you choose one. Try to get an idea of what you want to get out of it, look at what blogs you read/use, and decide that Weebly is not a good blogging platform. In fact, it is not a blogging platform at all. Maybe I’m biased, but WordPress is the best place to start, as it’s both very customizable while remaining user-friendly, working wonderfully for textbased blogs.

For image and video based blogs, Tumblr does the trick. It is quick and easy, but runs the risk of being social network-y, which can appear juvenile and mediocre. Blogger (Blogspot) is outdated in appearance, and customization options are few, but some blogs make it work.

2. Get a good name

Get a good name for your blog, and stick with it. You’re not Apple, but branding is important no matter how big or small the project. Try to stay away from these: Sarah’s Super Duper Music Blog, i lyke muzik, Shovel, etc. Memorable names are distinct, brief, and appropriate. (Do not in any circumstance name your Canadian music blog Candmu… been there, done that. It was a dark time.)

3. Avoid gushing

When you start writing (especially when it comes to album reviews), avoid gushing. It’s easy to get carried away with complimentary words. Great reviews will capture the sound of a record with just their words, like this one, leaving you with the impression that you’ve already listened to the album. Looking at the review a few hours later can be helpful in seeing if you’re over-praising.

4. Proofread!

This rule applies to anyone who writes anything ever. Seriously. It doesn’t take all that long and will save you a few face-palms that usually arrive sometime after you prematurely press the publish button.

5. Make friends

Do not be afraid to reach out. Lucky you, you can hide behind a computer screen and use your big vocabulary to make people believe you can’t still eat off the kid’s menu. Reach out – send emails to your favourite record labels and blogs, tell them you’re interested in what they’re doing. Having connections is key to running a music blog.

6. Decide how to present yourself

This means you have to decide whether you’re going to let people know how old you are. It’s never good to lie about it, but people may not take you as seriously if they know your age. Some good adjectives to use instead of your age are: inexperienced, new, humble, spring chicken, wet behind the ears, etc.

7. Don’t tell anyone

Don’t tell anyone about your blog. Your parents will tell their friends and you’ll never be allowed to cuss while ranting and raving about how disappointing the Polaris Prize Shortlist is. Your friends will probably be relatively unimpressed and will not even know what the Polaris Prize is.

8. Tell EVERYONE

Tell EVERYONE about your blog. Having more readers and people who want to know about what you’re doing will feel great. Get the word out on social media, Twitter being especially handy. It allows you not only to connect with people in the industry, but also to share things when your time is limited.

9. Have patience

Yes, we are aware that you can’t attend 19+ shows. When you get media invites to cool gigs in cities far away from your small Northern Ontario town, hang your acne-ridden head in sadness and wait it out.

10. Write. Write a lot.

Consistency is imperative. Getting discouraged is almost a guarantee, because gratification is not always instant. Nothing remedies it like getting a thank you email from that band whose debut record you decided to review or getting a promo download to that album you were going to buy.

11. Find your niche.

This advice may be overused, but establishing a unique voice is very important and creates a deeper connection with your readers. It is what makes people come back – it’s what brought you here.

12. Do not make your hits more important than your content.

Do not, in any circumstance, make your hits more important than your content. Integrity, child! If you find yourself turning into modern day Rolling Stone, you may want to re-evaluate and remember why you’re doing this in the first place.

Mistakes will be made. Tears may or may not be shed in hours that may or may not be late. But the rewards are well worth it and with these tips and some old fashioned elbow-grease, you are on your way to becoming a valuable part of a welcoming community that shares your values.

 

Shawna Naklicki is a young grasshopper who learned (almost) everything she knows about blogging through mistakes. She’s been writing with zeal at Sound Vat since age 15. Her proudest moment was finally getting business cards.

Vous êtes jeune. Vous vivez dans une ville de retraités déprimante à la gloire passée. Vous avez découvert CBC radio et vos nuits se ponctuent de programmes statiques doux et internationaux. En même temps que cette découverte éclot un tout nouveau monde de musique – de musique canadienne – dont vous n’aviez jamais entendu parlé auparavant. Vous voulez en parler. Vous voulez que tout le monde soit au courant. Vous voulez en faire partie. Dans un monde interconnecté infini d’opinions, de visions et de sons, vous décidez que vous avez votre mot à dire.

Vous commencez un blog :

1. Renseignez vous sur

Renseignez vous sur les différentes plateformes de blogue avant d’en choisir une. Essayez d’avoir une idée de ce que vous voulez en faire, regardez ce que les blogues que vous lisez utilisent et décidez que Weebly n’est pas une bonne plateforme de blogue. En fait ce n’est même pas une plateforme de blogue. Peut-être que je suis biaisé, mais WordPress est le meilleur endroit pour commencer, c’est à la fois très personnalisable tout en restant facile à manier et fonctionne très bien pour les blogues à base de texte.

Pour les blogues d’images et de vidéos, Tumblr fait l’affaire. C’est rapide et facile, mais ça prend le risque d’être réseau socialisant, ce qui peut apparaître juvénile et médiocre. Blogger (Blogspot) est dépassé niveau apparence, et les options de personalisations sont peu nombreuses, mais certains blogues s’en sortent bien.

2. Trouvez un bon nom pour votre blogue

Trouvez un bon nom pour votre blogue, et tenez-y vous. Vous n’êtes pas Apple, mais l’effet de marque est important quelque soit la taille du projet. Essayez de vous tenir à l’écart de ceux-ci : Le Blogue de Musique Super Génial de Sarah, i lyke muzik, Shovel, etc. Les noms mémorables sont distincts, bref et appropriés. (N’appelez en aucun cas votre blogue sur la musique canadienne Candmu …. je suis passé par là. C’était une sombre époque.)

3. Quand vous commencez à écrire évitez les gros épanchements.

Quand vous commencez à écrire, (surtout quand vous en venez aux critiques d’albums), évitez les gros épanchements. Il est facile de se laisser emporter en compliments. Les meilleurs critiques capturent le son d’un enregistrement avec leurs simples mots, comme celle-ci, et vous laisse avec l’impression d’avoir déjà écouté cet album. Relire la critique quelques heures plus tard peut aider à voir si vous en faîtes trop.

4. Relisez-vous!

Relisez-vous! Cette règle s’applique à toute personne qui écrit quoique ce soit, mais sérieusement. Ça ne prend pas tant de temps et ça vous évitera quelques mains au front qui se produisent habituellement après avoir poussé le bouton de publication prématurément.

5. Faîtes-vous des amis

Faîtes-vous des amis. N’ayez pas peur d’entrer en contact. Vous avez de la chance, vous pouvez vous cacher derrière l’écran de votre ordinateur et utiliser votre grand vocabulaire pour faire croire aux gens que vous ne pouvez pas encore manger plus qu’un menu enfant. Entrez en contact – envoyez des mails à vos étiquettes et blogues préférés, dîtes leur que ce qu’ils font vous intéresse. Avoir des connections est la clé dans la tenue d’un blogue.

6. Décidez comment vous vous présentez

Décidez comment vous vous présentez. Cela veut dire que vous devez décider si vous allez laisser les gens savoir quel âge vous avez. Ce n’est jamais bon de mentir sur son âge, mais certains ne vous prendront jamais sérieusement si ils le connaissent. Quelques bons adjectifs que vous pouvez utiliser pour éviter de donner votre âge : inexpérimenté, nouveau, poussin, jeunot-e, etc.

7. N’en parlez à personne

N’en parlez à personne. Vos parents en parleront à leurs amis et vous ne pourrez plus dire de gros mots lorsque vous pesterez et râlerez sur la décevante liste de nominés du Polaris Prize. Vos amis seront probablement relativement peu impressionnés et ne sauront peut-être même pas ce qu’est le Polaris Prize.

8. Dîtes le à TOUT LE MONDE

Dîtes le à TOUT LE MONDE. Avoir plus de lecteurs et de gens qui veulent en savoir plus sur ce que vous faîtes fera plaisir. Répandez la nouvelle sur les média sociaux, Twitter est très pratique pour cela. Cela vous permet de connecter avec des gens de l’industrie, mais aussi de partager des choses quand votre temps est compté.

9. Ayez de la patience

Ayez de la patience. Oui, soyez conscient que vous ne pouvez pas aller aux concerts + de 19 ans. Quand vous recevez une invitation pour des gigs sympas dans des villes loin de votre petite ville de l’Ontario du Nord, contenez en tristesse votre tête couverte d’acné et attendez que ça passe.

10. Ecrivez. Ecrivez beaucoup

Ecrivez. Ecrivez beaucoup. Être constant-e est impératif. Être découragé-e est quasiment une garantie, car la gratification n’est pas toujours immédiate. Rien n’y remède aussi bien que de recevoir un mail de remerciement de ce groupe dont vous aviez décidé de chroniquer le premier album ou de recevoir un téléchargement promotionnel pour cet album que vous alliez acheter.

11. Trouver votre niche

Trouver votre niche. Ce conseil est peut-être trop rabaché, mais établir une voix unique est très important et crée une connexion plus forte avec vos lecteurs. C’est ce qui fait que les gens vont vouloir revenir – c’est ce qui vous y a amené.

12. Ne rendez, sous aucunes circonstances, votre nombre de vues plus important que votre contenu

Ne rendez, sous aucunes circonstances, votre nombre de vues plus important que votre contenu. De l’intégrité mon enfant ! Si vous vous retrouvez à devenir un Rolling Stone des temps modernes, vous allez peut-être vouloir ré-évaluer ce que vous faîtes et vous souvenir du pourquoi vous le faisiez au début.

Des erreurs seront commises. Des larmes seront ou ne seront pas versées à des heures qui seront ou ne seront pas tardives. Mais les récompenses le valent bien et avec ces indications et de la bonne vieille huile de coude, vous êtes sur le chemin pour devenir une partie intégrante de la communauté accueillante qui partage vos valeurs.

 

Shawna Naklicki est une jeune scarabée qui a appris (à peu près) tout ce qu’elle sait sur la tenue de blogue à travers des erreurs. Elle écrit avec zèle sur Sound Vat depuis ses 15 ans. Son plus grand moment de gloire a été de finalement recevoir des cartes de visites.

New Canadiana :: the One (family) – the One (family)

the One (family) - the One (family)the one family (thumb)

The astonishing back catalogue of Amok Recordings, reaching back to 2006, is home to much of Canada’s finest experimental and ambient, noise, folk and post-rock music. From Jay Morritt to A-mo & Amplifier Machine, the creative output of the friends of Amok is nothing short of awe-inspiring, and the One (family)’s self-titled cassette is yet another offering of minimalist post-rock goodery.

Echoing the stylings of Constellation Records, the duo of Becky Dawn Burroughs and Justin Scott Gray beautifully synchronize the distinct realms of sample-driven ambience and classical instrumentation. The first side bears the distinct stylistic trademarks of post-rock: the ebb and flow of near quiet to emotional upheaval, mice to lions and then back again. The roar subsides, however, during the final minutes of “Hero”. Burrough’s jilted refrain over quiet keys gives off a tenable sorrow. This vocal styling continues to resonate against the backdrop of lachrymose keyboard, circuitous violin and tape hiss samples on “Rose”. The cassette emanates the sense of its being only moments away from total visceral takeover, but, rather than leaving you utterly spent, it leaves you hanging on for something. The One (family) force you into that silent reverie where amorphisms tumble and spill over one another, catharsis pooling in the palm of your hands. This is post-rock for the post-feeling, music for the heaviness in all of us.

Le catalogue ahurissant d’Amok Recordings, remontant à 2006, est la maison d’une quantité importante de la meilleure musique ambiante, noise, folk et post-rock canadienne. De Jay Morritt à A-mo & Amplifier Machine, la production créatrice des amis d’Amok n’est rien de moins que grandiose, et la cassette éponyme de The One (family) est un autre cadeau bonbon de post-rock minimaliste.

Faisant échos au style de Constellation Records, le duo composé de Becky Dawn Burroughs et Justin Scott Gray synchronise magnifiquement les sphères des instrumentations ambiantes et classiques. La face A porte distinctement la marque de commerce stylisée du post-rock ; le flux et le reflux d’une agitation émotive quasi-silencieuse, des souris aux lions, encore et encore. Cependant, les rugissements se stabilisent durant les dernières minutes de « Héro ». Le refrain abandonné de Burrough, sur des notes muettes, montre une tristesse soutenue. Ce style vocal continue de résonner contre la toile de fond du clavier larmoyant, du sifflement éloigné du violon et des échantillons sur « Rose ». L’idée de n’être qu’à quelques instants de la prise de contrôle totale émane de cette cassette, mais, au lieu de vous laisser complètement dépassé, cette dernière vous laisse en attente de quelque chose. The One (family) vous force à entrer dans ce rêve silencieux où les substances amorphes basculent et se renversent les unes sur les autres, une catharsis rejointe dans la paume de votre main. C’est du post-rock pour les post-sentiments, de la musique pour cette pesanteur qu’on a tous à l’intérieur.

the One (family) – Hero

the One (family) – rose

New Canadiana :: Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music

Justin Scott Gray - Adult MusicJustin Scott Gray - Adult Music (thumb)

A unique combination of folk and post-rock elements imbues these compositions by Elliot Lake’s Justin Scott Gray with an understated sincerity. Pressed to dual-colour cassette, the physical appearance of this release perfectly embodies the binary nature of Gray’s Adult Music. Side A (White) exudes the gentle stirrings of seasonal change, with instrumental elements coalescing to breathe an autumnal calm; a reminder of the palpable space between fall and winter that finds us grappling with the slow decay of the day as the temperate dark stifles the once bright early morning sky. Draped in an intimated melancholy as heavy as the misgiving in his hushed vocals, the songs of side B (Black) belong to the endless night of the cold winter, with frozen hands as substitutes for fragile hearts. This release exists as a poignant audio chronology, its lessons bound in stories hidden in the quiet yet battering liveliness of Gray’s musical forecastings.

Une combinaison unique d’éléments folks et post-rocks imprègne d’une sobre sincérité les compositions de Justin Scott Gray, en provenance d’Elliot Lake. Enregistré sur cassette audio deux tons, l’apparence physique de cette sortie représente parfaitement la nature binaire d’Adult Music. La face A, (blanche), exhale les doux émois des changements de saisons. Les instrumentations s’unissent pour souffler un calme automnal, un rappel de cet espace palpable entre l’automne et l’hiver où nous nous battons contre la lente décomposition du jour, la noirceur tempérée qui étouffe de plus en plus la lumineuse clarté matinale. Drapé dans une intime mélancolie, aussi pesante que ses vocalises presque faussement murmurées, les chansons de la face B, (noire), appartiennent aux nuits interminables de l’hiver, avec des mains gelées comme substitut aux coeurs fragiles. Cette oeuvre existe comme une poignante chronologie audio. Ses leçons sont masquées à travers les histoires à la fois tranquilles et farouches, des prévisions musicologiques de Gray.

Justin Scott Gray – An evening Waltz

Justin Scott Gray – Circles