Tag: annemarie papillon

Cityscape :: Edmonton

Weird-Canada-EdmontonWeird-Canada-Edmonton-thumb

Edmonton feels alone up north. Our geography, our isolation and our resources help shape us; there is an enduring adventurousness in the things created here. The pockets where society and expression percolate do so out of passion, fun and above all: survival.

So what is this place that’s a bit too far north for many touring bands to come to? Edmonton is a small town. Edmonton is part work camp, a subtly aware and modern haven burgeoning; a youthful city eager to grow. The imminent changes (good or bad) from an ever-fracturing future help incubate energy and inspiration.

Before the arrival of explorers and immigration, the Edmonton area was home to tribes of Cree, Dene, Nakota Sioux, Saulteaux, Blackfoot and Metis people. In the early 1900s Alberta’s economy, and inevitably its future, changed from respecting the land to resource extraction and influence-peddling from all corners of the globe. Our role as a confused world player in the oil game has thickened people’s skin, for good and bad.

Along with the intended structures and tangible places that facilitate creative endeavour, inspiration penetrates through the intangible: seasons, geography and rural sensibilities. Our summers are fleeting and busy; our winters long and eerily comfortable, and more than you know were raised in small towns off secondary highways. Our public art and our distinctive architecture sheen metallic and utilitarian.

Thanks in part to the irreplaceable CJSR, and our remaining arts weekly, people soon find out there’s an impressive genre-span in Edmonton. Delightfully opposite to the deep suburban “contributors”, bands in town get ‘er done at home, while the performance and pageantry bears out within intimate dwellings and in the Great Whyte Schlubbery.

Because Edmonton is geographically sheltered from many (most) major centres, there’s an incubatorial element to this city. Artists and bands try anything they want, and if and when it catches on beyond Lloydminster, those that make their name beyond Alberta tend to relocate to larger places. There is money and opportunity for many; and dim prospects for the same. What manifests itself is creativity that’s honest, supportive and grounded: working class. The winds of change are beginning to blow all around the province, and people here take what they know and what they love and just do their thing.


Tee-Tahs – A Cups


Betrayers – Do You Smoke?


Jom Comyn – Cool Room


Rhythm of Cruelty – Nothing’s Left


Renny Wilson – Clean


Zebra Pusle – Seventh Wav

<<< read more >>>

Summer

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-SummerSummer is the comforting riposte to the (usually) soul-sucking, snail’s-pace winter. Will summer be two months long this year, or three? Edmonton summers are green, invigorating and the best excuse to do as much as possible. Lots of time spent in our precious river valley, one of the largest urban green spaces around. It’s part local lore, campsite, performance space and existential blanket.

Festivals

Hot Plains: http://hotplainsmusic.com/
Endless Bummer: https://www.facebook.com/endlessbummeredmonton
Bermuda Fest: http://bermudafest.com/
Interstellar Rodeo: http://interstellarrodeo.com/
Up + Downtown Festival: http://updt.ca/
Fringe Festival: https://www.fringetheatre.ca/

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-FestivalsThere’s a need to be festive here, born from the geography and fleeting warm seasons. Bursts of creativity, loosening the blue and white collars (mostly blue) to celebrate all genres in groovy compartmentalization. These days, there’s more thirst and more support for regularly large hoe-downs. Newer festivals continue to grow right along with the modern weirdness alive here today.

Wunderbar

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Wunderbar1Address: 8120 101 Street
Contact: http://wunderbar-edmonton.com/
(LGBTQ friendly)

It’s hard to put into words the personal and financial sacrifice that has gone into turning an old German soccer pub with extremely questionable clientele into a venue bands from around the country know about (and love). But here goes: for almost half a decade, Martell and the fellas have been the doorway darkening facilitators for all kinds of music all across this damn northern epic, and around the world. In over four years, Wunderbar has become the epicentre of the weird, beautiful and unkempt musicians, artists, comedians and people who dig what they do. For bands who’ve had the task and pleasure of touring the country, Wundi is a very necessary stop. And for the uninitiated, show some passion, sensibility (and a with-it sound) and you may get a spot on a bill.

Update: As of this writing, Craig and his partners have officially put the Wunderbar up for sale.

Ramshackle Day Parade

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-RDPContact: http://ramshackledayparade.wordpress.com/
(LGBTQ friendly)

Started around 2008, Ramshackle Day Parade (RDP) is the creation of Parker James Thiessen : a means to host performance, release records and expose the city to the outsiders and their experiments. Damn-near seven years later, RDP continues to be thee showcase of weirdness, mind expansion and destitute expression of those trapped in this icy fortress; sinistral cigarettes burn and the future looks unknowingly bright.

Whyte Avenue

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Whyte

One of the more salient examples of our urbanity – Whyte Avenue – starts the day as a hub of shops, food, drink, one-armed pushups and buskers. At night, the historic strip turns into a haunted vestige of money, booze and disconcerting moments of stabby avoidance. Artists and musicians happily pass through the weekend; the drudgery and money is but a blip on the righteous path to good times.

The Log Cabin

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Log-Cabin(LGBTQ friendly)

A fortunate situation has manifested itself in a safe, beautiful space to do the familiar things we enjoy – eat, drink, experience. Belonging to a local social worker, she along with family and friends have used this unique space, at one point to another, as a vegan breakfast joint, wedding venue, film set, stand-in studio and performance space. Edmonton has a tendency to put aside forethought and bulldoze irreplaceable structures. But here we are…a log cabin in the city, standing the test of time.

Listen/Freecloud/Blackbyrd

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Record-StoresBlackbyrd: http://www.blackbyrd.ca/
Listen: http://listenrecords.net/
Freecloud: http://www.freecloud.ca/

Listen: Part of the underpinning of a renewed 124 Street west of downtown, Listen ain’t large but there’s a good chunk of everything there. Always good finds in the world music and international reissure section. Freecloud: Located across the street from the city’s major arts high school (coincidence?!), Freecloud seems to have a classic, old punk record shop kind of vibe. Large curated used section and lots of local gems. Blackbyrd: Maintained by the consumers and creators, Blackbyrd’s the magnet for neighbourhood dwellers and curios determined Northsiders. Located smack-dab in the midst of Whyte, stop by for a chat, and a dig through reissues and local sounds.

Edmonton semble toute seule là-bas, au nord. Son emplacement géographique, son isolement et ses ressources nous façonnent : il y a une audace persistante dans toutes les choses créées ici. Société et expression s’animent dans ces creusets par passion, par plaisir mais surtout, pour survivre.

Alors, c’est quoi cet endroit, juste un peu trop au nord pour que les groupes viennent y jouer? Edmonton, c’est une petite ville c’est un havre moderne subtilement conscient, toujours en chantier : c’est une ville jeune qui ne demande qu’à grandir. Les changements imminents (bons ou mauvais) de son futur de plus en plus fragmenté aident à y faire éclore énergie et inspiration.

Avant l’arrivée des explorateurs et les vagues d’immigration, Edmonton était la terre des Cris, des Dénés, des Nakota Sioux, des Saulteaux, des Blackfoots et des Métis. Au début des années 1900, l’économie de l’Alberta – et inévitablement son futur – a changé. Elle est passée du respect de la terre) à l’extraction des ressources et au trafic d’influence venant de partout autour du globe. Son rôle en tant que joueur incertain dans le grand jeu du pétrole a endurci les gens, pour le meilleur et pour le pire.

En plus des structures et des lieux tangibles encourageant l’esprit créatif, l’inspiration provient de l’immatériel : les saisons, la géographie et la sensibilité rurale. Nos étés sont fugaces et sans repos, nos hivers sont longs et étrangement confortables. Plus de gens qu’on ne le pense ont grandi dans des villages sur le bord d’une route secondaire. Notre art public et notre architecture distincte ont le reflet métallique et utilitaire.

Les gens sont de plus en plus conscients de la panoplie de genres artistiques d’Edmonton, en partie grâce à l’irremplaçable CJSR et à notre dernier hebdomadaire artistique. S’opposant délicieusement à leurs collaborateurs des banlieues profondes, les groupes locaux remportent la coupe à la maison, comme dans le bon vieux temps.

Puisqu’Edmonton est éloigné géographiquement de nombreuses (presque toutes) grandes villes, on s’y retrouve comme dans un incubateur. Les artistes et les groupes essaient ce qu’ils veulent et si ça se rend jusqu’à Lloydminster; ceux qui ont réussi à se faire un nom au-delà des frontières de l’Alberta ont tendance à déménager vers de plus grandes villes.

Il y a de l’argent et des occasions pour plusieurs, mais le contraire est aussi vrai. Ce qui ressort est honnête, encourageant et solide : une créativité ouvrière. Les vents de changement commencent à souffler sur la province et ses habitants utilisent ce qu’ils connaissent et ce qu’ils aiment pour faire leurs trucs.


Tee-Tahs – A Cups


Betrayers – Do You Smoke?


Jom Comyn – Cool Room


Rhythm of Cruelty – Nothing’s Left


Renny Wilson – Clean


Zebra Pusle – Seventh Wav

<<< la suite >>>

L’été

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-SummerL’été est la riposte réconfortante à un hiver (trop) souvent éreintant et interminable. Est-ce qu’il durera deux mois cette année, ou trois? Les étés d’Edmonton sont verts et revigorants : la meilleure des excuses pour en profiter au max. On passe beaucoup de temps dans notre chère vallée fluviale, un des plus grands espaces verts urbains aux alentours. C’est tant une tradition locale, un terrain de camping et un lieu de performance qu’une doudou existentielle.

Festivals

Hot Plains : http://hotplainsmusic.com/
Endless Bummer : https://www.facebook.com/endlessbummeredmonton
Bermuda Fest : http://bermudafest.com/
Interstellar Rodeo : http://interstellarrodeo.com/
Up + Downtown Festival : http://updt.ca/
Fringe Festival : https://www.fringetheatre.ca/

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-FestivalsIci, il y a un profond besoin d’être festifs causé par la géographie et la saison chaude fugace. Ces festivals sont des explosions créatives desserrant les cols bleus et blancs (surtout les bleus), pour célébrer tous les genres en morcellement groovy. Il y a aujourd’hui une plus grande soif et un meilleur soutien pour les festivals à grande échelle. Les festivals plus récents continuent de grandir au même rythme que la bizarrerie contemporaine caractéristique d’Edmonton.

Wunderbar

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Wunderbar1Adresse : 8120 101 Street
Contact : http://wunderbar-edmonton.com/
(Bienvenue aux LGBTQ)

Il est difficile de décrire tous les sacrifices personnels et financiers qui ont été faits pour ce projet : transformer un vieux pub sportif allemand, où on présentait des matchs de soccer à une clientèle extrêmement douteuse, en un lieu de spectacle connu (et adoré) par des groupes de partout au Canada. Mais je me lance : pendant près d’une demi-décennie, Martell et ses chums ont soutenu ce foutu bled nordique pour présenter de la musique de tout genre en provenance des quatre coins du globe. Sur plus de quatre ans, Wunderbar est devenu l’épicentre des musiciens, comédiens et artistes bizarres, superbes et débraillés; et des gens qui aiment ce qu’ils font. Pour les groupes qui avaient la mission (et le plaisir) de partir en tournée au Canada, Wundi est un arrêt incontournable. Et pour les non-initiés, si vous montrez de la passion, de la sensibilité et un son qui va avec, vous obtiendrez peut-être votre place pour une soirée. Mise à jour : Au moment d’écrire ces lignes, Craig et ses associés avaient officiellement mis en vente le Wunderbar.

Ramshackle Day Parade

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-RDPContact : http://ramshackledayparade.wordpress.com/
(Bienvenue aux LGBTQ)

Ramshackle Day Parade (RDP) a été créé en 2008 par Parker James Thiessen. C’est un moyen de présenter des performances, de sortir des disques et d’exposer la ville à toutes ces expériences marginales. À peu près sept ans plus tard, RDP continue d’être la référence en matière de bizarre, d’ouverture d’esprit et de l’expression démunie de ceux prisonniers de cette forteresse de glace; une sinistre brûlure de cigarette et un futur semblant plus clair, à notre insu.

Avenue Whyte

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-WhyteL’avenue Whyte est un des meilleurs exemples de notre urbanité : de jour, c’est un bourdonnement de boutiques, de nourriture, de boissons et de pushups à un bras; de nuit, ce coin historique devient un endroit hanté par les fantômes de l’argent, l’alcool et d’instants tranchants qu’on aimerait éviter. Les artistes et les musiciens passent des fins de semaine heureuses, la corvée et l’argent ne sont qu’un courant d’air sur le chemin menant au plaisir.

The Log Cabin

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Log-Cabin(Bienvenue aux LGBTQ)

Un évènement heureux s’est réalisé dans un bel endroit sécuritaire pour nous permettre de faire les choses que nous aimons : manger, boire, expérimenter. L’endroit appartient à une travailleuse sociale de coin, et à un moment ou un autre, elle et ses amis ont utilisé l’endroit comme resto de déjeuners végétaliens, salle de réception de mariage, plateau de tournage, et lieu de performance. Edmonton a cette tendance d’ignorer les prévisions et de détruire les structures indispensables. Mais nous voilà, une cabane en rondin au milieu de la ville, à l’épreuve du temps.

Listen/Freecloud/Blackbyrd

Weird-Canada-Edmonton-Record-StoresBlackbyrd : http://www.blackbyrd.ca/
Listen : http://listenrecords.net/
Freecloud : http://www.freecloud.ca/

Listen : Faisant partie de la revitalisation de la 124e Ouest du centre-ville, Listen n’est pas très grand, mais on y trouve une bonne pelletée de tout. Il y a toujours des trouvailles dans les sections musique du monde et rééditions internationales. Freecloud: Situé en face d’une école secondaire spécialisée en art (coïncidence?!), Freecloud a une atmosphère classique, style vieux magasin de disques punks. On y trouve une superbe section de trucs usagés. Blackbird: Entretenu par ses fondateurs et ses clients, Blackbyrd est un aimant pour les citadins curieux. Fais-y un arrêt pour discuter et pour fouiller dans la section rééditions et découvertes locales.

New Canadiana :: Blisters – Are You Awake

Weird_Canada-Blisters-Are_You_Awake

Welcome to a place where everything collapses once it enters the realm. We can watch, and we do so passively, as memories begin to slip beyond our fingers before they’ve begun to form. This single object took years in the making — and yet — is it the real one? Do we grip, or do we let the chrysalis go on untouched until we smell that nostalgia we presupposed indefinite? We can formulate our own creation myths to speculate how it began and how it is finally here to be held, but Blisters as we might have known them have already evolved and flown away.

Bienvenue dans un endroit où tout s’effrondre une fois dans le domaine. Nous pouvons regarder, et nous le faisons passivement, tandis que nos souvenirs glissent entre nos doigts avant même d’avoir commencé à se former. À lui seul, cet objet a demandé des années à être fabriqué — et encore — est-ce le vrai? Devrions-nous y toucher ou devrions-nous laisser la chrysalide intacte jusqu’au moment où nous sentirons cette nostalgie, celle que nous avions présumée indéfinie? Nous pouvons formuler nos propres mythes de création afin de spéculer comment cela a commencé et de quelle manière cela est enfin ici, à portée de main, mais les Blisters comme nous pensions les connaître ont déjà évolué et se sont envolés.


Blisters – Are You Awake


Blisters – Whale

New Canadiana :: Learning – Culkin

Weird_Canada-Learning-Culkin

“Cutest band in Saint John,” says Barb Crawford. True, but also one of the most talented and promising with this strong debut. Ought: The New Class. The other teenage post-punk phenom. Welcome to the Shark Tank; you can’t escape unscathed. They didn’t blow it; please don’t really give up.

Barb Crawford pense qu’ils sont le “plus mignon groupe de Saint John’’. C’est vrai, mais ils sont aussi un des groupes les plus talentueux et prometteurs avec ce début prometteur. Ought: La Nouvelle Classe. L’autre phénomène post-punk d’ado. Bienvenue dans le réservoir à requin; tu n’en sortiras pas indemne. Et ce n’est pas terminé, n’abandonne pas.


Learning – The Gun Show


Learning – Burth

New Canadiana :: Simply Saucer – Baby Nova

Simply_Saucer-Baby_Nova

The cosmic late pass handed to Hamilton’s outerstellar statesmen Simply Saucer extends to this EP, with songs written between ’74-76, recorded in 2011, and finally released in 2014. The Baby Nova sessions were laid down at Detroit’s Ghetto Recorders, with the reformed touring group at a tough-as-nails zenith. Local luminary McKinkey Jackson lends some pounding keys and swirling B3 to a pair of tunes, but the real standouts are the gut-churning title track and gentle lull of “I Take It”, previously channeled in lysergic fashion by the UK’s Earthling Society. Hitch a ride on this scorching hot spacecraft.

Le billet de retard cosmique remis à Simply Saucer s’étend jusqu’à ce EP avec des chansons écrites entre 1974 et 1976, enregistrées en 2011 et sorties en 2014. Les sessions Baby Nova ont pris place au Ghetto Recorders de Détroit avec l’ancien groupe de tournée à son plein apogée. La sommité locale McKinkey Jackson a prêté quelques martèlements de clés et un tournoiement de B3 sur deux chansons, mais ce qui marque le plus est la macabre chanson-titre « I Take It » et sa douce accalmie, morceau précédemment canalisé de façon lysergique par Earthling Society du Royaume-Uni. Demande un lift sur ce vaisseau spatial torride.


Simply Saucer – Baby Nova


Simply Saucer – I Take It

New Canadiana :: OUTTACONTROLLER – Colt Summer // Pink Wine – OUTTAWINE

output_KXmm7e

Halifax hosers OUTTACONTROLLER rip out a couple of sloshy slummer jams on their Colt Summer 7”, an ode to the drunk punk days of adolescence. They’re then joined by Toronto greasers Pink Wine for the cross-pollinating, cover-ama split release, OUTTAWINE. It’s full of power-pop psalms about poor sleeping habits that’ll make you pogo ‘til you puke, and laments about how your once favourite band) has long since broken your heart, which is something that neither of these bands will ever do for as long as they’re around.

Les mauvais garçons d’Halifax OUTTACONTROLLER servent deux chansons style slush d’été bien tassée sur leur dernier 7 pouces, Colt Summer, une ode à ces journées d’adolescence un peu arrosée. Ils sont ensuite rejoints par les Torontois graisseux Pink Wine pour la sortie de OUTTAWINE, un split contre-pollinisé. C’est rempli de psaumes power pop à propos de mauvaises habitudes de sommeil qui te feront faire le pogo jusqu’à gerber et te lamenter que ton ancien groupe préféré t’as brisé le coeur, quelque chose qu’aucun de ses deux groupes là ne fera, de toute leur existence.


OUTTACONTROLLER – Colt Summer


Pink Wine – Wasted Breath

Cityscape :: Ottawa

Ottawa

Dear Ottawa: Congrats! You’ve just finished your awkward phase. As the shy sibling of loudmouths Toronto and Montreal, you’re the introvert given a makeover, ’90s teen movie style. Now that you have your glasses off, I can’t help but kick myself for never noticing how charming you were before. You’re still a little quiet at times, but I’ve seen you rage at basement shows. With that bottle of corner store wine in your hands, you dance harder out of loyalty for the locals who always stuck by your side than for the out-of-town headliners who ignored you in middle school. Despite what they may yell in the hallways, you just keep walking with your head up, leaving those jerks to stare at the Bruised Tongue back patch on your jean jacket in wonder of how you got So Damn Cool.


Average Times – Summer Nights


New Swears – See You in Hull


The Steve Adamyk Band – Ontario

Gabba Hey

Gabba Hey
(Records, shows, rehearsal spaces)
Visit the Facebook page for more info.
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly
  • Not currently wheelchair accessible, owner has plans to build ramp shortly

A combination record store, venue and rehearsal space run by Ottawa renaissance man and former White Wires bassist Luke Nuclear, Gabba Hey has been home to some of the wildest shows I’ve been worthy to witness (case in point: an April performance by Nap Eyes has left everyone in the city obsessed with Whine of the Mystic). At the adjacent record store, you can always be sure to find a gem, whether it’s a 7” from Ottawa ex-pat Peach Kelli Pop, a Bruised Tongue cassette or an old Million Dollar Marxists t-shirt. Make sure you grab a few local zines from the shelf; I’d recommend Pancake by Sacha KW or Night Shift by JM Francheteau.

Pressed

Pressed
(Sandwiches, zines, shows)
750 Gladstone Ave. Contact: (613) 680-9294
[Photo: Daryl Andrew Reid]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly
  • All-ages accessible
  • Portable ramps for wheelchair accessibility, ask staff for help/access
  • Two steps into the building, one step into the washrooms

Vegan sandwiches. Waffles with meat. Spicy chips. If you’re in Ottawa, you definitely gotta eat here. Cozy vibes all around, from the old church pews for sitting to the local art hanging on the walls. With a zine rack managed by Lily Pepper, Pressed is very friendly towards Ottawa zinesters. The space is also the go-to cafe for all-ages entertainment, and I’ve seen everyone from Cousins to Cold Warps slay the tiny stage. If the windows steam up during a show, you know it was a good one.

Mugshots

Mugshots
(DJ nights, shows, drinks)
75 Nicholas St.
Contact: mugshots@hihostels.ca
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly

As a haunted outdoor jail bar, it’s safe to say that Mugshots is the only institution of its kind in the city. Mugshots is home to a variety of killer monthly events that take place in the courtyard: Ceremony for raving, Funhouse for spazz-punk, and Fryquency: a pay-what-you-can event put on by Debaser. Get a bit too crazy with the dark ‘n’ stormys? Spend the night hanging out with spirits in the hostel next door.

House of Targ

House of Targ
(Pinball, perogies, shows, DJ nights)
1077 Bank St.
Contact: (613) 730-5748
[Photo: Daryl Andrew Reid]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly
  • All-ages accessible (daytime)
  • Steep set of stairs to get down, call for wheelchair accessibility

One of the newest and coolest venues in the city, House of Targ is slowly transforming all of us from pizza punks to perogie punks. Equal combination arcade, stage and gastronomical delight, House of Targ is the only place in Canada where you can watch Pregnancy Scares throw down and play pinball at the same time. Sunday nights are reserved for the weekly session of Toughen Up!, where $5 grants you access to freeplay pinball and power-pop tunes spun all night long. Sensory overload for sure, but doesn’t it feel good to be alive? All ages are welcome during daylight, but shows are reserved for the 19+ crowd.

Birdman Sound

Birdman Sound
(Records, records, records)
593-B Bank St.
Contact: (613) 233-0999
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly
  • Wheelchair accessible

Established in 1991, Birdman Sound has often been cited as one of the best record stores in Canada, and is certainly up on the list in Ottawa. Managed by John Westhaver, stickman for The Band Whose Name Is A Symbol and long-time host of Friday Morning Cartunes on CKCU 93.1 FM, Birdman Sound has a good selection of fairly-priced new and used vinyl, covering many an obscure genre with everything from krautrock to post-punk, with a good stock of local punk releases as well. Don’t forget to get a copy of Small Talk on the way out!

Ottawa Explosion

Ottawa Explosion
(“A blog, a fest and your best friend”)
Contact: ottawaexplosion@gmail.com
[Photo: Daryl Andrew Reid]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly
  • Multiple venues; accessibility varies

Described as “a blog, a fest and your best friend,” Ottawa Explosion is a go-to resource for any show or band worth hearing in town (and beyond). The background brain behind it all is Emmanuel Sayer, programming director at CHUO 89.1 FM, City Slang co-host, Crusades guitarist… the dude keeps busy! Sprung from the remains of Gaga Weekend, Ottawa Explosion Weekend has grown into a five-day punk fest taking place every June that feels more like a super-cool family reunion than a group of kidults losing their minds to Thee Nodes. It’s not limited to summer, however: Emmanuel books shows all year round, and updates the blog with listings and new videos from local acts. Confession time: as a (younger) teenager, I would look through the show listings on the site, see what bands were playing and then buy all their albums. So, Emmanuel has basically determined my entire taste in music. Weird / rad!

Arboretum Music + Arts Festival

Aboretum Music + Arts Festival
(Festival, food, art)
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • LGBTQ+ friendly
  • Multiple venues; accessibility varies

Aboretum is the sleeked up yet still hip younger cousin of Ottawa Explosion Weekend, the one who doesn’t have any tattoos (or at least, any visible ones.) A non-profit cultural extravaganza of tunes, gourmet food, local art and workshops established in 2012, Aboretum is curated by Rolf Klausener of The Acorn and Silkken Laumann and now occurs every August. Don’t think that just because it’s polished means its square: last year’s show on the free stage ended in New Swears instigating a food fight in the Club SAW courtyard, whipped cream and crowdsurfing included.

Pizza Shark

Pizza Shark
($2 for a slice, $4.20 for a combo, seriously)
569 Gladstone Ave.
Contact: (613) 563-9999
[Photo: via pizzashark.ca]

  • Small set of stairs to walk up

Urban legend for diehards and locals only. Immortalized in song by local witches Bonnie Doon. Singer and second bassist Lesley Demon once told me, “If you eat at Pizza Shark, you will have a pizza shart.” Let it be clear: the place does not serve very good food. But you could probably tell that by the white Cadillac parked out front with the P SHARK license plate. After a show on Gladstone, it is likely you will wind up there at 2 a.m., stumbling around hungry with only a toonie. And that’s just enough for a slice. Just like Ottawa itself, Pizza Shark is small, stigmatized and totally ours – and that’s exactly why we love it.

Chère Ottawa : félicitations! Tu es passée au travers de ta période gênante. Tu es la petite soeur timide de Montréal et Toronto, tu es l’introvertie à qui on a offert une transfo-beauté, style années 90. Maintenant que tu as laissé tomber les lunettes, je me mords les doigts de ne pas avoir remarqué tout ton charme auparavant. Malgré que tu restes reservée de temps en temps, je t’en vue t’enflammer dans des concerts de sous-sols. Avec une bouteille de vin de dépanneur à la main, tu danses passionnément, plus par amour pour les ‘locaux’ qui sont toujours restés à tes côtés que pour les gros noms qui t’ignoraient dans la cour d’école. Malgré ce qu’ils crient dans les corridors, tu marches la tête haute, laissant à ces connards, les yeux rivés à ta poche de jeans fièrement agrémentée d’une patch de Bruised Tongue, le soin de se demander comment tu es devenue si cool.


Average Times – Summer Nights


New Swears – See You in Hull


The Steve Adamyk Band – Ontario

Gabba Hey

Gabba Hey
(Vinyles et disques, concerts, locaux de pratique)
Visitez la page facebook pour plus d’informations.
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont bienvenus.
  • Présentement non-accessible aux chaises roulantes, le proprio prévoit construire une rampe.

Une combinaison gagnante : un magasin de musique, un espace de spectacle et des locaux de pratique gérés par Luke Nuclear, l’Ottavien polymathe et ancien bassiste de White Wires. Gabba Hey fut la mère porteuse de quelques-uns des plus débiles concerts que j’ai vu. (Pour le prouver : une performance en avril de Nap Eyes a rendu tout le monde obsédé par Whine of the Mystic. Dans la boutique, tu es pratiquement assuré de trouver un trésor, que ce soit un 7 pouces par l’Ottavienne expatriée Peach Kelli Pop, une cassette de (Bruised Tongue)(http://weirdcanada.com/tag/bruised-tongue/) ou un vieux t-shirt de Million Dollar Marxists. Ramasse un fanzine avant de partir. Mes recommendations : Pancake de Sacha KW ou Night Shit de JM Francheteau.

Pressed

Pressed
(Sandwiches, fanzines, concerts)
750 Avenue Gladstone
Contact : (613) 680-9294
[Photo: Daryl Andrew Reid]

  • Les gens de tout âge et les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont bienvenus.
  • Rampe disponible pour donner accès aux chaises roulantes, demandez de l’aide aux employés.
  • Deux marches pour entrer dans l’immeuble, une marche pour les toilettes.

Sandwiches végétaliens. Gaufres à la viande. Croustilles épicées. Si vous passez par Ottawa, vous devez manger là. L’endroit est totalement chaleureux, des bancs d’église en guise de sièges en passant par les oeuvres d’artistes locaux accrochées aux murs. Avec sa mini-bibliothèque de fanzines dirigée pas Lily Pepper, Pressed tisse des liens d’amitié importants avec la communauté de zinesteurs. L’espace est aussi le café numéro 1 pour le divertissement tout âge, et j’ai pu apprécier la présence de tout le monde, de Cousins à Cold Warps, sur la petite scène. Si les fenêtres s’embuent pendant le concert, tu sauras que c’est génial là-dedans.

Mugshots

Mugshots
(Soirée DJ, concerts, buvette)
75 Rue Nicholas
Contact : mugshots@hihostels.ca
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont bienvenus.

Puisque c’est un bar-prison hanté, je crois qu’il est facile de dire que Mugshots est la seule institution en son genre dans la ville. Mugshots est le théatre d’une foule d’évènements mensuels du tonnerre, qui prennent place dans la cour : Ceremony pour les raves, Funhouse pour le punk eccentrique, et Fryquenc, un évènement à contribution volontaire organisé par Debaser. Vous avez légèrement abusé des dark ‘n’ stormys? Passez la nuit à (ne pas) dormir avec les esprits à l’auberge juste à côté.

House of Targ

House of Targ
(Pinball, perogies, concerts, soirées DJ)
1077 Rue Bank
Contact: (613) 730-5748
[Photo: Daryl Andrew Reid]

  • Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont les bienvenus.
  • Accessible à tous les âges (jour)
  • Des marches pour descendre, appelez pour l’accessibilité aux chaises roulantes.

Un des plus cools et des plus récents établissements, House of Targ nous transforme lentement de pizza-punks à pérogies-punks. Une combinaison gagnante d’arcade, de scène et de délices gastronomiques, House of Targ est le seul endroit au Canada où tu peux voir Pregnancy Scares se défoncer et jouer au pin ball en même temps. Les dimanches soirs sont les soirs Toughen Up!, là où 5 $ te donnent accès illimité aux machines de pin ball et aux meilleurs tubes power-pop, toute la soirée. Certainement une surdose pour les sens, mais n’est-il pas bon d’être en vie ? Pendant le jour, l’accès est tout âge mais les concerts sont 19 ans et plus.

Birdman Sound

Birdman Sound
(Musique, musique, musique)
593-B Rue Bank
Contact: (613) 233-0999
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont les bienvenus.
  • Accessible aux chaises roulantes.

Établi en 1991, Birdman Sound retient l’attention depuis longtemps comme un des meilleurs disquaires indépendants au Canada et est certainement au haut de la liste pour Ottawa. Géré par John Westhaver, batteur pour The Band Whose Name Is A Symbol et animateur aguerri de Friday Morning Cartunes sur CKCU 93.1 FM, Birdman Sound offre une bonne sélection de disques neufs et usagés, couvrant une multitude de genres obscurs, du krautrock au post-punk, en laissant une place particulière aux bands punks locaux. N’oublie pas ta copie de Small Talk à la sortie!

Ottawa Explosion

Ottawa Explosion
(“Un blogue, un festival, ton meilleur ami”)
Contact: ottawaexplosion@gmail.com
[Photo: Daryl Andrew Reid]

  • Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont les bienvenus.
  • Espaces multiples, l’accessibilité varie.

Étant décrit comme ‘’un blogue, un festival, ton meilleur ami’’, Ottawa Explosion est la ressource numéro 1 pour tous bands ou concerts qui méritent ton attention à Ottawa (et ailleurs !). Le génie derrière ce projet est Emmanuel Sayer, directeur de la programmation à CHUO 89.1 FM, co-animateur de City Slang, guitariste de Crusades… le gars se garde occupé ! Né des restes de Gaga Weekend, Ottawa Explosion Weekend a évolué pour devenir un festival punk de 5 jours à ajouter au calendrier chaque mois de juin. C’est plutôt une réunion de famille hyper cool qu’une bande d’enfants-adultes qui perdent la tête sur Thee Nodes. Ce n’est pas seulement l’été: Emmanuel organise des concerts toute l’année et tient le blogue à jour avec des nouvelles et des vidéos de bands locaux. Confession : quand j’étais une jeune adolescente, je passais mon temps à lire la liste des concerts et j’achetais les albums de tous les bands. Emmanuel a façonné mes goûts musicaux. Bizarre mais génial!

Arboretum Music + Arts Festival

Aboretum Music + Arts Festival
(Festival, bouffe, art)
[Photo: Andrew Carver]

  • Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ+ sont les bienvenus.
  • Espaces multiples, l’accessibilité varie.

Aboretum, c’est le cousin cool mais bien peigné d’Ottawa Explosion Weekend, celui qui n’a pas de tatouages visibles. Un évènement à but non-lucratif de chanson, de bouffe gourmet, d’art et d’ateliers établis en 2012, Aboretum est organisé par Rolf Klausener de The Acorn et de Silkken Laumann et prend place chaque mois d’août. Il serait faux de penser que c’est poli parce que c’est pincé : le concert de l’année dernière sur la scène principale s’est terminé avec New Swears initiant une guerre de bouffe dans la cour du Club SAW, la crème fouettée et le ‘croudsurfing’ inclus.

Pizza Shark

Pizza Shark
($2 pour une pointe, $4.20 pour un combo, sérieusement)
569 Avenue Gladstone.
Contact: (613) 563-9999
[Photo: via pizzashark.ca]

  • Quelques marches à monter.

Une légende urbaine pour les irréductibles et la faune locale. Immortalisé en chanson par les sorcières de Bonnie Doon. La chanteuse et bassiste Lesley Demon m’a déjà dit : ‘’Si tu manges chez Pizza Shark, ça pourrait mal finir’. Soyons honnête, l’endroit ne sert pas de la très bonne bouffe. Mais c’était presque évident en voyant la cadillac stationnée en face avec son immatriculation ‘‘P SHARK’’. Après une soirée sur l’avenue Gladstone, il y a de bonnes chances que tu t’y retrouves à 2 heures du mat, avec une pièce de deux dollars en poche et un p’tit creux. Et c’est juste assez pour une pointe. Comme Ottawa, Pizza Place est petit, stigmatisé et totalement nôtre, et c’est pourquoi on l’aime autant.

New Canadiana :: Los – Romances

Los - Romances

Rock music is best seen in black and white, and it never drifts far without clashes. Los spare this album’s artwork of any shades of grey. In a skewed mindset, it might even spark some waiting room shivers, a Club Med sensuality or a Saturnian meditation. The true colour of Romances lies at the opposite extreme of these hints of exposed sepia, fluorescent and pastel worlds. In the contrast of black and white, its vital force spreads; in the here and now of its congruent guitars, its absorbant bass, its flamboyant drumline, its fiery tongue reminding us that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Black, the sombre promise of danger, of posibilities, of animal submissivness and heroic uprisings. White, the answer given at dusk, four songs caressing and squaring you off, then leaving you bloodless and without the memory at dawn.

Le rock apparaît sous son meilleur jour en noir et blanc, et il ne s’éloigne jamais de cette palette sans péril. Romances épargne la pochette de toute nuance de gris, et ce titre, qui suscite selon vos dispositions particulières les frissons de salle d’attente, une sensualité de Club Med ou des ruminations saturniennes, laisse deviner des mondes sépia, fluo ou pastel. C’est plutôt dans le contraste du noir et du blanc que sa force vitale se déploie, dans l’ici et le maintenant de ses guitares congruentes, basse absorbante, batterie flamboyante, langues de feu qui vous rappellent, sur l’air des lampions, qu’un tiens vaut mieux que deux tu l’auras. Noire, la promesse nocturne de dangers, de possibles, de soumissions animales et de soulèvements héroïques. Blanc, le chèque signé au crépuscule, quatre chansons qui caressent et équarrissent, puis vous laissent exsangue et sans le souvenir à l’aurore.


Los – Ghost


Los – Nature Boy

Cityscape :: Victoria

Cityscape :: VictoriaCithyscape :: Victoria

The backbeat of dark cobblestoned alleyways, the rugged shorelines of the mystic Pacific, the raindrops of 1862’s history, and the musical heterogeneity in the city’s nooks and crannies are a few of the reasons why Victoria is a poetic city. In an afternoon you can wander the dramatic and spacious streets, venture in and out of art galleries, thrift and record stores, cafes and venues, all while eating a fresh, caught-that-day fish taco. Youthful spirits and old souls of all sorts paint the rhythmic mountainous spaces. With the same entertainment of a metropolis, this little harbour city is accessible on foot or bike. You cannot resist Victoria’s small town community vibe, and will bump into someone you know, whether you want to or not! Listen to Darth Vader play violin, watch a man draw 18th century murals with sidewalk chalk, spark up a conversation with a stranger, try on costumes, or just simply throw bread at the seagulls; anything goes in Victoria. It’s a city that doesn’t discriminate, and there is something for everyone.

To only name a small few, here are some of my favourite scenes in Victoria.

 


Babysitter – Crace Mountain


Himalayan Bear – Hard Times


Freak Heat Waves – Nausea


David P. Smith – The Lonely Astronaut

 

THE FIFTY-FIFTY ARTS COLLECTIVE

50-50_Arts_Collective-web

The Fifty-Fifty Arts Collective is a non-profit, artist-run centre that provides a space and an opportunity for a variety of artists who have not yet been developed in the mainstream. This gem is managed by a small group of volunteers working extremely hard to promote the independent scene through their art gallery, film showings, and live performances as well as on and off-site events throughout the Victoria area. Fifty Fifty provides underground artists with an appropriate, affordable and endearing venue to showcase their talents. Check out their killer locally-induced compilation on bandcamp.

 

DITCH RECORDS & CDs

Ditch_Records-web

  • 784 Fort St.
  • Contact: 250-386-5874
  • (Wheelchair accessible, no stairs, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Ditch Records & CDs is an independent record store carrying used & new vinyl, CDs and DVDs. This narrow, cave-like shop is irresistible and stimulating even for those with the highest degrees of ADD, with unique music playing, poster-covered walls and endless tempting vinyl in well organized, homemade racks. Ditch offers a wide variety of the obscure with a knowledgeable, smiley staff. I challenge you to walk out of there without buying your favourite new record. A great supporter of the community’s arts scene, they offer consignment albums for local artists and tickets for live shows.

 

Talk’s Cheap // CAVITY Curiosity Shop

Cavity-Talks_Cheap-web

  • 556 B Pandora Ave.
  • Contact: 250-381-9857
  • (First floor is wheelchair accessible, stairs for second floor, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Sara Hembree ]

Based downtown, Talk’s Cheap (downstairs) and CAVITY Curiosity Shop (upstairs) is Victoria’s most potent record store and pop culture galley. Covered in vintage movie posters, this two-leveled, intimately grunge store focuses mainly on punk, new wave, garage and power pop. If you’re looking for hard-to-find records, Talk’s Cheap will become your new locale. Make sure to check out the crates on the floor too, you might have to dig but you could find a record as low as $1 that will be worth your time. With an extensive selection of new and used records, cassettes, CDs, music books, underground comics, horror movies, t-shirts and pins, it will become evident why this record store is my favourite. I have yet to walk out of there without buying the record they were playing in-store. These gentlemen know what they’re doing. They have sharp online music reviews, a charismatic atmosphere, occasional live shows featuring local underground bands, plus limited edition prints and art. It’s a Weird Canadian’s dream.

 

THE DARK HORSE BOOKSTORE

Darkhorse_Bookstore-web

  • 623 Johnson St.
  • Contact: 250-386-8736
  • (Wheelchair accessible, no stairs, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

The Dark Horse is Victoria’s most unique and magical new and used bookstore. The walls are illustrated in an array of literature, most of which specialize in occult, counterculture and subversive expertise. However, they do offer other genres. This wizardly emporium’s cynosure is hard-to-find books. They also offer a variety of metaphysical products including tarot cards, oracles, incense, wands, smudge sticks and jewelry. My favourite part is their diversified crystal collection and wooden circled sales table, which normally contains radical political compositions. The staff is knowledgeable and friendly, yet they keep their distance and allow endless wondering for those with restless souls (this comes easy in a store like Dark Horse). Often, this mystical shop will host local talent including music, educational workshops and psychic readings. Far from monotonous, this witch-like sliver in the wall is a must.

 

CAMAS BOOKSTORE

Camas_Bookstore-web

  • 2620 Quadra Street
  • Contact: 250-381-0585
  • (Wheelchair accessible, no stairs, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

This collective is named in honour of the camas plant, which is cultivated and harvested as a root vegetable by the local Lekwungen people who were oppressed by European colonialism. Camas is far beyond a small bookstore. It is a volunteer-run space, which incorporates used books, artisan-produced items, free wi-fi, workshops, and guest speakers into an autonomous zone that favors anti-authoritarian and non-hierarchical activism. Through their distribution of radical publications and artwork, Camas advocates alternatives to all forms of exploitation. Inspiration and anarchist thoughts will creep your lingering cognition upon your first steps into this welcoming and warm environment. Stop by, say hi, read their bulletin board, use their internet, skim through their penetrating book selection or spark up a quixotic conversation with a fellow revolter. This community-orientated locale is worth a stop.

 

CORNER STONE CAFÉ

Corner_Stone_Cafe-web

  • 1301 Gladstone Ave
  • Contact: 250-381-1884
  • (Wheelchair accessible, no stairs, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Located in the trendy neighbourhood of Fernwood, Corner Stone Café is a social experience equipped with delicious local coffee. Hang out, meet your neighbours, access local information and events on their overwhelming bulletin board, listen to live music, and use their free wireless internet while eating their famous banana coconut chocolate chip bread! This progressive café not only provides an exciting atmosphere but also reinvests all of their income back into the neighbourhood through Fernwood’s Neighbourhood Resource Group’s programs and services. Plus, they produce nearly zero waste through their recycling and composting programs. Wednesday evenings feature bluegrass music, and Friday evenings are their open-mic nights.

 

RE-BAR

Re-Bar-web

  • 50 Bastion Square
  • Contact: 250-361-9223
  • (Possible wheelchair accessibility, stairs, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Re-Bar is a vegetarian restaurant that even meat lovers will enjoy! It is located near Bastion Square, which is where hangings used to occur, and some say this space is haunted. You will find Re-Bar at the end of a cobblestoned alley across from an Irish pub. Since 1988 this healthy, labour of love has been providing its customers with food and juices that are handmade with local ingredients in a trendsetting atmosphere. It’s a hip and busy place, so service can vary somewhat as a result, but that’s expected. However with a relaxed vibe, a touch of femininity, and unique décor, it is worth the wait. Re-Bar also has a vegetarian cookbook, which you can find directly through the restaurant itself here. Re-Bar’s coconut cream pie is my favourite to-go treat to eat down by the harbour, which is only a stone’s throw away from the restaurant. Dine in with the vibrant decor or enjoy a juice and snack on the salty docks by the ocean.

 

LOGAN’S PUB

Logans_Pub-web

  • 1821 Cook St, Victoria BC
  • Contact: 250-360-2711
  • (Wheelchair accessible, LGBTQ friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Logan’s is by far my favourite entertainment space; it is Victoria’s best non-classy venue for live independent music. Its interesting mix of characters, dungeonous bathrooms and moderately priced drinks are guaranteed to erupt some chuckles. Hootenannys, which happen every Sunday from 4 to 9 pm, is where you will find talented local performers with a hint of some nutty screwball performances. Order their famous poutine with a pitcher, smoke a dart with friendly locals, and begin to embrace your bats in the belfry.

 

THE PATCH CLOTHING

The_Patch-web

  • 719 Yates Street
  • Contact: 250-384-7070
  • (Wheelchair accessible, LGBTQ Friendly)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

If you’re looking for a kaleidoscopic experience with a matching appearance, then The Patch Clothing store is a timeless realm where you will spend the rest of your day. Shimmy shake while trying on high quality vintage, retro or contemporary finery to nostalgic tunes. Some items are priced more expensively and others are modest. Either way, try on some costumes with your friends or find your new go-to outfit for the month. Since 1995, The Patch Clothing has been dedicated to up-cycling for vintage appreciators. All demographics, styles and personalities wander in and out of The Patch. It can be overwhelming but if you appreciate treasures then you will relish in the endless racks.

 

BEACON HILL PARK

  • 100 Cook Street
  • Contact: (250) 361-0600

JOHNSON STREET BRIDGE

  • Johnson Street

CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL / CEMETERY

Church-Last_Photo-web

  • Quadra St. and Rockland Ave.
  • Contact: 250-383-2714
  • (Wheelchair accessible, stairs, LGBTQ Friendly)
  • [Photos: Preacher Katie]

Don’t want to spend money? Unlike some cities, Victoria can be entertaining even with a hole in your pocket. Beacon Hill Park is located close to downtown, so take a stroll along the ocean or through the streams, gardens and goat petting area.

Johnson Street Bridge is not as hard to conquer as one might think. Unfortunately, this bridge is being demolished within the year. Normally climbing this bridge is a secret, but the secret is out! The view from the top needs to be fancied while it is still standing. It is a high climb and can be slippery when wet. Obviously don’t be an idiot, but it is the best view of Victoria you can get. You will be surrounded by the ocean and city, plus a clear view of the mountains. The bridge is accessible from the public walkway, and there is a metal sheet over the steps, but if you hold on to the railings then you can wiggle your way up. Don’t look suspicious; just own it and nobody will notice.

The cemetery and church located on Quadra St. and Rockland Avenue. (close to downtown) is surrounded by tired trees and tombstones. Take a silent break from your day and walk around in the eerie hallways and pews of the church. Stained glass envelops you, and the high, ancient ceilings will make you realize the insignificance of your troubles. After, take a stroll in the little park/cemetery located beside the church. It is filled with characters and stories; this space will reveal some of Victoria’s secrets.

Les échos des ruelles pavées de noir, les rivages escarpés du mystique Pacifique, les gouttelettes historiques de 1862 et l’hétérogénéité musicale de chaque coin et recoin de la ville ne sont que quelques raisons qui font de Victoria une ville si poétique. En un après-midi, il est possible de flâner à travers les larges rues aux accents dramatiques, d’aller et venir entre galeries d’art, friperies, magasins de disques, cafés et salles de spectacles, et tout cela en dégustant un taco de poisson, pêché le jour même. Les jeunes esprits comme les vieilles âmes de toutes sortes peignent la beauté mythique de ses espaces montagneux. Bien qu’elle comporte tout le brouhaha culturel d’une grande ville, Victoria est accessible à pied ou en vélo. Il est difficile de résister à son atmosphère de petite communauté; vous croiserez immanquablement quelqu’un que vous connaissez! Écoutez Darth Vader jouer du violon, regardez un homme dessiner des murales du XVIIIe siècle avec de la craie, déclenchez une conversation avec un étranger, essayez des costumes ou donnez simplement du pain à des goélands; tout est possible à Victoria. C’est une ville qui ne discrimine pas et où il y a quelque chose pour tous.

En n’en nommant que quelques-uns, voici mes lieux favoris à Victoria.

 


Babysitter – Crace Mountain


Himalayan Bear – Hard Times


Freak Heat Waves – Nausea


David P. Smith – The Lonely Astronaut

 

THE FIFTY-FIFTY ARTS COLLECTIVE

50-50_Arts_Collective-web

Le collectif artistique Fifty-Fifty est un organisme à but non lucratif, géré par les artistes, qui a pour mission de fournir un espace et l’opportunité d’une variété d’artistes marginaux. Ce joyau est géré par un petit groupe de bénévoles qui travaillent extrêmement fort pour promouvoir la scène indépendante, et ce, avec leur galerie d’art, la projection de films ainsi que des performances live, en plus de présenter des évènements ailleurs à Victoria. Fifty-Fifty offre aux artistes marginaux un endroit abordable, approprié et plaisant où présenter leur talent. Écoutez cette compil locale déchaînée sur bandcamp.

 

DITCH RECORDS & CDs

Ditch_Records-web

  • 784 rue Fort
  • Contact: 250-386-5874
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Ditch Records & CDs est un magasin de disques indépendant spécialisé dans les disques vinyles, les disques compacts et les DVDs, nouveaux et usagés. Cet étroit commerce à l’effet caverneux est à la fois charmant et stimulant même pour les gens intensément atteints de déficit de l’attention; on y joue toujours de la musique unique, les murs y sont couverts d’affiches et les vinyles sont infiniment tentants, si bien organisés dans leurs présentoirs faits maison. Ditch offre une immense sélection de trucs obscurs et ses employés sont souriants et connaisseurs. Je vous mets au défi de sortir de là sans acheter votre nouveau disque favori. L’établissement est un supporteur de la communauté artistique locale; il prend les albums d’artistes locaux en consignes et vend des billets de spectacles.

 

Talk’s Cheap // CAVITY Curiosity Shop

Cavity-Talks_Cheap-web

  • 556 B Pandora Ave.
  • Contact: 250-381-9857
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Le premier étage est accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Sara Hembree ]

Ayant pignon sur rue au centre-ville, Talk’s Cheap (en bas) et CAVITY Curiosity Shop (en haut) est un pilier puissant de la culture pop de Victoria. Les murs couverts de posters de vieux films, ce magasin de deux étages intimement grunge se concentre principalement sur la musique punk, new wave, garage et power pop. Si vous cherchez des albums difficiles à trouver, Talk’s Cheap deviendra rapidement votre endroit favori. Prenez le temps de faire le tour des bacs de disques sur le plancher; vous aurez besoin de fouiller mais vous trouverez quelque chose à votre goût pour seulement 1$. Avec une sélection étendue de disques neufs et usagés, de cassettes, de CDs, de livres sur la musique, de bandes dessinées, de films d’horreur, de t-shirts et de pins, il deviendra sans doute votre nouvel endroit favori. Je n’ai pas encore réussi à en sortir sans acheter l’album qui jouait en magasin. Ces gens savent ce qu’ils font. Ils partagent d’intelligentes critiques d’albums en ligne, l’atmosphère de l’endroit est charismatique, ils présentent des concerts de groupes locaux en boutique en plus d’avoir des affiches et des pièces d’art en édition limitée. C’est un rêve inspiré de Weird Canada.

 

THE DARK HORSE BOOKSTORE

Darkhorse_Bookstore-web

  • 623 Johnson St.
  • Contact: 250-386-8736
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

The Dark Horse est le plus unique et le plus magique de tous les magasins de livres neufs et usagés de Victoria. Les murs illustrent un immense tableau littéraire principalement spécialisé dans l’occulte, la culture marginale et l’expertise subversive. Il propose aussi d’autres genres. Le point de mire de cet ensorcelant emporium est la sélection de livres rares. Il offre aussi une sélection de produits métaphysiques: des cartes de tarots et d’oracles, de l’encens, des baguettes magiques et des bijoux. Ma partie favorite est la collection diversifiée de cristaux et la table de vente en bois sur laquelle repose habituellement des zines politiques radicaux. Les employés sont connaisseurs et amicaux, mais ils gardent quand même leurs distances et permettent à toutes ses âmes agitées (elles sont communes au Dark Horse) d’errer sans fin. Souvent, ce commerce mystique offre des activités; des musiciens locaux, des ateliers éducatifs et des lectures psychiques. Loin d’être monotone, ce coin un peu sorcier est un impératif.

 

CAMAS BOOKSTORE

Camas_Bookstore-web

  • 2620 Quadra Street
  • Contact: 250-381-0585
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Ce collectif fut nommé en l’honneur de la plante Camas qui est cultivée et récoltée comme un légume-racine par le peuple local Lekwungen, jadis opprimé par le colonialisme européen. Camas est beaucoup plus qu’une librairie. C’est un espace géré par des bénévoles qui incorpore livres usagés, items fabriqués par des artisans, wi-fi gratuit, ateliers et conférenciers, le tout dans une zone autonome qui favorise l’activisme non hiérarchique et antiautoritaire. Grâce à la distribution de publications et de pièces d’art radicales, Camas propose et soutient des solutions de remplacement pour toutes formes d’exploitations. L’inspiration et les pensées anarchistes s’immisceront dans votre tête dès vos premiers moments passés dans ce lieu invitant et chaleureux. Arrêtez dire bonjour, lire le babillard, utiliser l’internet, faire le tour de la collection pénétrante de livres ou avoir une conversation chimérique avec un autre révolutionnaire. Ce lieu orienté vers la communauté vaut la peine.

 

CORNER STONE CAFÉ

Corner_Stone_Cafe-web

  • 1301 Gladstone Ave
  • Contact: 250-381-1884
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Situé dans le quartier en vogue de Fernwood, le Corner Store Café est une expérience sociale agrémentée de café local délicieux. Venez y relaxer, rencontrer vos voisins, consulter l’immense babillard rempli d’informations et d’évènements locaux, écouter des gens jouer de la musique et utiliser l’internet gratuitement, tout ça pendant que vous dégustez un fameux pain banane-chocolat-noix de coco! Ce café alternatif offre non seulement une ambiance excitante, mais il réinvestit aussi tous ses profits au voisinage dans les programmes et services de Fernwood’s Neighbourhood Resource Group. Aussi, il ne produit presque aucun déchet grâce à son programme de recyclage et de compostage. Le mercredi soir est une soirée Bluegrass et le vendredi soir, c’est la scène libre.

 

RE-BAR

Re-Bar-web

  • 50 Bastion Square
  • Contact: 250-361-9223
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accès possible en fauteuil roulant, il y a quelques marches.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Re-Bar est un restaurant végétarien qui plaira même aux carnivores! Il est situé près de Bastion Square, où auparavant, avaient lieu les pendaisons et certains pensent que l’endroit est hanté. Vous trouverez Re-Bar au bout d’une petite rue pavée de pierres, en face d’un pub irlandais. Depuis 1988, ce sain labeur plein d’amour offre à ses clients de la nourriture et des jus faits à la main avec des ingrédients locaux, le tout dans un environnement avant-gardiste. C’est une place à la mode et très occupée, alors le service peut s’en faire ressentir, mais on s’y en attend. Par contre, son ambiance détendue, son décor unique et sa touche féminine valent la peine. Re-bar a aussi produit son livre de recettes végétarien. Vous pouvez le trouver directement sur le site du restaurant. Leur tarte crème et noix de coco est un délice indétrônable à déguster près du port situé juste à quelques pas. Soupez dans la salle à manger parmi le décor vibrant ou apportez un jus et une collation sur les quais au bord de l’océan.

 

LOGAN’S PUB

Logans_Pub-web

  • 1821 Cook Street
  • Contact: 250-360-2711
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Ce pub est de loin mon lieu de divertissement favori: c’est le meilleur endroit alternatif pour écouter de la musique indépendante à Victoria. Son mélange intéressant de personnages, ses toilettes similaires à des donjons et ses boissons à prix modiques vous garantissent quelques rires. Lors de la soirée Hootenannys, qui a lieu chaque dimanche de 16h à 21h, vous découvrirez les performances de talents locaux avec un brin de trucs déjantés. Commandez sa célèbre poutine avec un pichet, jouez aux dards avec des habitués et acceptez avec plaisir votre petit côté cinglé!

 

THE PATCH CLOTHING

The_Patch-web

  • 719 Yates Street
  • Contact: 250-384-7070
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Si vous êtes à la recherche d’une expérience kaléidoscopique avec une apparence aussi colorée, alors le magasin The Patch Clothing deviendra un espace où le temps est oublié et où vous passerez le reste de votre journée. Vous danserez sur des tubes rétro tout en essayant des vêtements vintage de qualité datant de la même époque. Certains articles sont plutôt chers mais d’autres le sont moins. Quoi qu’il en soit, essayez-y des costumes avec vos amis et dénichez votre nouvel ensemble favori du mois. Depuis 1995, The Patch Clothing se dévoue au « up-cycling » des vêtements usagés. Des gens de partout, de tous les styles et de toutes les personnalités aiment vagabonder dans le Patch. L’expérience peut sembler accablante, mais si vous appréciez les trésors, vous savourerez les allées sans fin.

 

BEACON HILL PARK

  • 100 Cook Street
  • Contact: 250-361-0600

JOHNSON STREET BRIDGE

  • Johnson Street

L’ÉGLISE ET SON CIMETIÈRE

Church-Last_Photo-web

  • Quadra Street et Rockland Ave.
  • Contact: 250-383-2714
  • (Les gens s’identifiant comme LGBTQ sont bienvenus. Marches par endroits. Accessible en fauteuil roulant.)
  • [Photo: Preacher Katie]

Pas envie de dépenser de sous? Contrairement à certaines villes, Victoria peut être divertissante malgré des poches vides. Le parc Beacon Hill est situé près du centre-ville; faites une promenade sur le bord de l’océan ou des canaux, à travers les jardins et près de la petite ferme de chèvres.

Le pont de Johnson Street n’est pas si difficile à escalader qu’on pourrait le penser. Malheureusement, il sera démoli cette année. Habituellement, escalader ce pont est un secret, mais plus maintenant! La vue du sommet a besoin d’être appréciée pendant que c’est encore possible. C’est une longue escalade qui peut être glissante quand elle est mouillée. Évidemment, ne soyez pas idiots, mais c’est la plus belle vue que vous pouvez trouver à Victoria. Vous serez entourés de l’océan et de la ville en plus d’avoir une vue très claire des montagnes. Le pont est accessible à partir de la promenade et il y a une petite clôture en métal devant les marches, mais si vous vous faufilez un peu, vous les atteindrez. N’ayez pas l’air suspicieux; faites comme si de rien n’était et personne ne vous remarquera.

Le cimetière et l’église situés au coin de la rue Quadra et de l’avenue Rockland (près du centre-ville) sont entourés d’arbres fatigués et de vieilles pierres tombales. Prenez une pause de tranquillité et errez à travers les étranges couloirs et bancs de l’église. Les vitraux vous envelopperont et les anciens plafonds majestueux vous feront réaliser l’insignifiance de vos soucis. Ensuite, faites une promenade dans le petit parc/cimetière derrière l’église. Il est rempli de personnages et d’histoire; cet endroit vous révélera quelques-uns des secrets de Victoria.

Imprint :: Tenzier

Tenzier-TNZR050-053-web

Montreal’s Tenzier states its aims plainly: “To preserve, celebrate and disseminate archival recordings by Quebec avant-garde artists.” From the jump-cut plunderphonics of Étienne O’Leary to the electroacoustic fever dreams of Gisèle Ricard, these anomalous offerings from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s provide a fascinating glimpse into an unheralded history. Tenzier’s four LPs (to date) are not simply reissues, but instead sonic pearls scooped up from private collections and made available for the first time. Weird Canada spoke to Eric Fillion, the chief archivist of Quebec’s avant past.

 

Bernard Gagnon – Totem Ben

Gisèle Ricard – Je Vous Aime

Étienne O’Leary – Day Tripper (excerpt)

Le Quatuor de Jazz Libre du Québec – Sans Titre

 

Jesse Locke: What inspired you to start this project with such a specific regional focus?

Eric Fillion: I’m from Montreal, and have a clear attachment to Quebec. I’ve been playing music here for many, many years, and had the sense that there was a history that needed to be uncovered. Doing Tenzier is a way of allowing connections to be made. For each of the releases, I try to match an older musician with a current visual artist. For example, Sabrina Ratté did the artwork for the Gisèle Ricard LP, and Felix Morel did the collage for Bernard Gagnon. Match made in heaven there!

The regional focus also allows me to meet the musicians, not just communicate by email or phone. Gisèle Ricard is in Quebec City, so it’s a short drive there to meet with her. Bernard Gagnon and former members of the Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec are in Montreal. Lunch is always an option and we try to meet regularly. The human component of the project is huge, and it’s something I didn’t really understand at first or anticipate. The ability to work directly with these artists is something that I wouldn’t change. I’m also conducting doctoral research in history, and my interests deal with Quebec’s cultural production. The music I research for Tenzier is sort of out there compared to what I’m studying at a university level, but there’s still a connection.

Ultimately, I think it would be great if other people did similar projects. If 10 or 15 people in Canada wanted to set up labels or organizations to focus on their specific cities or provinces, you would get a much more complete history of avant or underground music. Maybe I’m dreaming here, but I think there’s a possibility to do this in other places. Montreal and Quebec have had a dynamic music scene for decades, but I know many other areas have that as well.

Besides the artists’ location, what other criteria do you have for the music you choose to release?

Tenzier’s releases are not reissues — they are archival recordings that have never been made available. I’m interested in voices from the margins, meaning artists that don’t really fit the dominant narratives about Quebec’s cultural production for the period I’m interested in: the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. Often, it comes from people making experimental music that didn’t end up teaching in universities or refused, for one reason or another, to associate with the province’s key cultural institutions. As such, their contributions may have gone unnoticed or undocumented for the new generations to explore.

One good example is Bernard Gagnon, who’s been active since the late 1960s. He had been involved in every major experimental or underground scene in Quebec, and contributed to several Musique Actuelle LPs, but never released a record under his own name. Going through his archives was great, because he had tons of reels. Gisèle Ricard had also been really active in Quebec City, but never released anything outside of the Capac 7”.

Releasing records is only part of Tenzier’s mandate, though. I try to put out one LP each year, usually in the fall, but parallel to that I’m also collecting material – recordings, visuals, correspondence – when I can and slowly digitizing things for future releases or research purposes. At some point, I would love to turn Tenzier into some kind of research center. The records are a way of making sure there’s a trace left in the present, and we deposit a copy at the National Library in Ottawa, as well as the Quebec National Library. All of a sudden, these artists and their music exist, making it possible for people like me who are doing research to have access much more quickly to a growing body of works. Ultimately, I would like to make all the documents that have been digitized but not released available to people.

Last summer, I partnered with the Videographe, which is a video co-op set up in 1971 through the NFB. In 1973 it became a non-profit organization, and they have tons of experimental videos that combine experimental music. Tenzier prepared a short program titled Québec électronique for the 2013 edition of the Suoni Per Il Popolo. It featured people like Richard Martin, who went to the U.S. and studied with Alvin Lucier. I’m working with the Videographe to disseminate those videos online, and have interviewed Richard Martin and added that to the archive. All of this falls under Tenzier’s mandate.

Bernard Gagnon live at Le Beat, 1983.

Bernard Gagnon live at Le Beat, 1983.

So far, your releases have come out in chronological order, from Etienne O’Leary in the 1960s to Gisele Ricard in the 1980s. Will you continue this pattern, or start bouncing around in time?

I didn’t realize I was doing that [laughs]. That was a total accident and I didn’t plan it that way, so yes, I am going to start bouncing around. Tenzier will never go past the 1980s, as it became much easier from the ’80s onward for artists to release their own tapes or records. In Quebec, you had Ambiances Magnétiques, which did a fantastic job of documenting whole spectrums of experimental or weird music, but before that there was really nothing. The NFB put out a soundtrack and that was great, but it was a one-off project. Otherwise, McGill had a record label putting out material recorded in the university’s electronic music studio, and Radio Canada International released a few records of electroacoustic compositions. Aside from that, there were no small labels, so there is a lot of music made in the ’60 and ’70s recorded on 1/4” tapes that are just sitting in boxes. I think I’ll be busy enough focusing on those three decades.

I also wanted to ask about the numbering of your releases. On Discogs, your trio CD with Dominic Vanchesteing and Alexandre St-Onge is listed as TNZR001, and then it jumps straight to TNZR050. Are there 49 lost releases floating in the ether?

Nothing is missing. Initially, when I started Tenzier it was towards the end of Pas Chic Chic, and I wanted to set up an infrastructure for musicians to collaborate. This included myself, and I wanted to reach out to musicians that I had a tremendous respect for, but hadn’t had the chance to work with. The mini-CD series, numbers one to 49, was meant to serve that purpose. At the same time, I started working on the Etienne O’Leary LP and decided that #50 onward would be the historical releases from Tenzier. Within four or five months of that time, I made the decision to go back to school to continue graduate work. I subsequently quit playing music to focus on my research. It became apparent to me that Tenzier could become a vehicle to reconcile my academic interests with my background as a musician. This allowed me to stay in touch with musicians and visual artists, and contribute something concrete. After Tenzier 001, I stopped playing music and that series ended there.

What plans do you have moving forward? Can you give us a sneak peek into any upcoming releases or activities?

I can’t really talk about releases yet because I haven’t had a chance to sit down with the interested parties. I do plan on releasing another LP in the fall though, and am currently digitizing a bunch of material that I’m super excited about. Each year I try to organize an event or kind of retrospective as well, and this fall I’m working with Jean-Pierre Boyer, who made experimental videos in the early ’70s. He invented his own video-synthesizer, which he named the Boyétizeur, so we’re going to show his work and have a live performance.

I was really excited to see Gisèle Ricard’s collaboration with Bernard Bonnier on the new Tenzier LP. Casse-Tête Musique Concrète is so wild. Do you know about any more music that he recorded?

That’s an amazing record. There’s also the Capac 7”, but nothing else in terms of official releases. I would assume he has other material recorded, as Bernard Bonnier and Gisèle Ricard owned a studio together. Bernard passed away, but his son probably has reels stored somewhere in a basement. That would be worth looking into at some point.

What’s the weirdest music from Quebec you’ve ever heard?

To me, weird music is not a pejorative term. It’s brilliant music because it forces you to listen differently and takes you to new places. Quebec had so much weird music, especially in the 1980s. A lot of people were releasing cassettes back then (like nowadays, I guess) and you could find amazing stuff, demos and other strange sound objects, at L’Oblique. The first name that comes to mind is Les Biberons Bâtis, which was the project of Bruno Tanguay, also known as Satan Bélanger. Before Les Biberons Bâtis, Bruno was in a group called Turbine Depress, which is also truly singular music. I think you will enjoy Les Biberons Bâtis.

Tenzier Discography (To Date)

  • TNZR001 – Dominic Vanchesteing, Eric Fillion, Alexandre St-Onge – Untitled [Mini CD, 2010]
  • TNZR050 – Étienne O’Leary – Films Et Musiques Originales (1966 – 1968) [LP, 2010]
  • TNZR051 – Le Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec – 1973 [LP, 2011]
  • TNZR052 – Bernard Gagnon – Musique Électronique (1975-1983) [LP, 2012]
  • TNZR053 – Gisèle Ricard – Électroacoustique (1980-1987) [LP, 2013]

L’étiquette montréalaise Tenzier exprime pleinement ses objectifs: ‘’Préserver, célébrer et propager les enregistrements d’archives des artistes avant-gardistes du Québec.’’ Des phonétiques saccadées d’Étienne O’Leary aux rêves électro-acoustiques fièvreux de Gisèle Ricard, ces anormales offrandes des années 60, 70 et 80 pourvoient un aperçu fascinant à travers ces parcours méconnus. Les quatre LPs de Tenzier (jusqu’à maintenant) ne sont pas seulement des ré-éditions mais plutôt des perles sonores dénichées dans des collections personnelles et mises à notre disposition pour la première fois. Weird Canada a discuté avec Eric Fillion, l’archiviste en chef du passé avant-gardiste du Québec.

 

Bernard Gagnon – Totem Ben

Gisèle Ricard – Je Vous Aime

Étienne O’Leary – Day Tripper (excerpt)

Le Quatuor de Jazz Libre du Québec – Sans Titre

 

Jesse Locke: Qu’est-ce qui t’as inspiré à démarrer ce projet avec un focus régional si spécifique?

Éric Fillion: Je viens de Montréal et j’ai un attachement clair pour Québec. Je joue de la musique depuis plusieurs années et j’avais le sentiment qu’une histoire avait besoin d’être découverte. Tenzier est une manière de créer des connections. Pour chacune des sorties, j’essaie de joindre un musicien plus âgé avec un artiste en art visuel. Par exemple, Sabrina Ratté a créé la couverture pour le LP de Gisèle Ricard et Felix Morel a fait le collage pour Bernard Gagnon. Deux superbes harmonies!

Le focus régional me permet aussi de rencontrer les musiciens, pas seulement par courriel ou par téléphone. Gisèle Ricard habite la ville de Québec alors ce n’est qu’une courte promenade en voiture pour la rencontrer. Bernard Gagnon et les anciens membres du Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec sont à Montréal. On peut toujours aller dîner et on essaie de se voir souvent. Le contact humain est un aspect important du projet et ce n’est pas quelque chose auquel je pensais au début, que j’anticipais. L’opportunité de travailler directement avec les artistes n’est pas quelque chose que je changerais. J’effectue aussi des recherches doctorales en histoire et mes intérêts se concentrent sur la production culturelle québécoise. La musique que je recherche pour Tenzier est un peu intense comparé à ce que j’étudie à l’université mais il y a tout de même une connection.

Ultimement, je pense que ce serait génial si d’autres gens travaillaient sur des projets similaires. Si 10 ou 15 personnes au Canada voulaient démarrer des étiquettes ou des projets avec un focus sur leur ville ou leur région, nous aurions un catalogue beaucoup plus complet de la musique avant-gardiste et indépendante canadienne. Peut-être que je rêvasse, mais je pense qu’il y a une possibilité de le faire ailleurs. Montréal et Québec possèdent une scène musicale dynamique depuis des décennies, mais je sais que plusieurs autres endroits aussi.

À part la provenance des artistes, quels sont les autres critères selon lesquels tu choisis la musique à publier?

Les sorties de Tenzier ne sont pas des ré-éditions, ce sont des enregistrements d’archives qui n’ont jamais été disponibles. Je m’intéresse aux voix marginales, souvent des artistes qui ne concordent pas vraiment avec les dominantes narratives de la production culturelle Québécoise de cette période (1960-1970-1980). Souvent, ce sont des gens qui font de la musique expérimentale et qui n’ont pas réussi à enseigner à l’université ou qui, pour une raison ou une autre, ont refusé de s’associer avec quelconque institutions culturelles de la province. Leur contribution a pu passer inaperçue ou ne pas avoir été documentée pour les générations futures.

Un bon exemple est Bernard Gagnon, qui est actif depuis la fin des années 60. Il s’est impliqué dans chacune des importantes scènes expérimentales et underground du Québec et a contribué à plusieurs des long-jeux ‘’Musique Actuelle’’ mais n’a jamais sorti un album sous son propre nom. Parcourir ses archives était génial, parce qu’il a une tonne de bobines. Gisèle Ricard a aussi été très présente dans la ville de Québec mais n’a jamais sorti autre chose que Capac 7”.

Publier des disques n’est qu’une partie du mandat de Tenzier. J’essaie de sortir un LP chaque année, habituellement en automne, mais parallèlement je collectionne aussi du matériel – des enregistrements, du visuel, des correspondences – autant que possible et je le digitalise pour de futures publications ou pour la recherche. Un jour, j’aimerais que Tenzier devienne un genre de centre de recherche. Les LPs sont une façon de s’assurer qu’il y ait une trace dans le présent et nous déposons une copie à la Bibliothèque Nationale d’Ottawa et à celle du Québec. Soudainement, ces artistes et leur musique existent, ce qui permet aux gens comme moi qui font de la recherche, d’avoir accès plus facilement à ces informations. Ultimement, j’aimerais que tous les documents qui ont été digitalisés soient accessibles à tous.

L’été dernier, j’ai créé un partenariat avec le Vidéographe, une coopérative de production vidéo démarrée en 1971 à travers l’ONF. En 1973, c’est devenu un organisme à but non-lucratif et ils ont une tonne de vidéos expérimentaux qui combinent la musique expérimentale. Tenzier a préparé un court programme intitulé Québec électronique pour l’édition 2013 de Suoni Per II Popolo. Le programme présentait des gens comme Richard Martin, qui a passé du temps au États-Unis et a étudié avec Alvin Lucier. Je travaille avec le Videographe afin de distribuer ces vidéos sur le web et j’ai interviewé Richard Martin et ajouté le tout aux archives. Tout cela fait partie du mandat de Tenzier.

Bernard Gagnon live at Le Beat, 1983.

Bernard Gagnon en concert à Le Beat, 1983.

Jusqu’à maintenant, vos parutions sont sorties en ordre chronologique, d’Étienne O’Leary dans les années 60 à Gisèle Ricard dans les années 80. Vas-tu continuer avec ce modèle ou bondir d’années en années?

Je n’ai pas remarqué que je faisais ça [rires]. C’est un accident, je n’ai pas du tout planifié cela alors oui, je vais commencer à bondir d’années en années. Tenzier ne va jamais aller plus loin que les années 80, parce que c’est devenu beaucoup plus facile, à partir des années 80, de publier ses propres cassettes et albums. Au Québec, il y avait Ambiances Magnétiques, qui faisait un travail fantastique à documenter un large spectrum de musique bizarre et expérimentale, mais avant eux, rien. L’ONF a sortie une bande-sonore et c’était génial mais ce n’était qu’un truc unique. Par ailleurs, McGill avait sa propre étiquette qui publiait du matérial enregistré dans les studios de l’université et Radio-Canada International a publié quelques compositions électro-acoustiques. À part de cela, il n’y avait pas de petites maisons de disques, alors il y a beaucoup de musique enregistrée dans les années 60 et 70, sur des cassettes 1/4’’, qui ne font que dormir dans des boîtes. Je pense que je serai assez occupé en focusant sur ces trois décennies-là.

Je voulais aussi te parler de la numérotation de tes parutions. Sur Discogs, ton triple CD avec Dominic Vanchesteing et Alexandre St-Onge est listé TNZR001 et ensuite ça passe à TNZR050. Est-ce qu’il y a 40 copies flottant dans l’éther?

Rien n’est perdu. Initialement, j’ai commencé Tenzier à la fin de Pas Chic Chic, et je voulais mettre en place une infrastructure qui favorise la collaboration entre musiciens. Cela m’incluait et je voulais faire appel à des musiciens pour lesquels j’ai un immense respect mais avec lesquels je n’avais pas eu la chance de travailler. La mini-série CD, numéroté 1 à 49, a servi à cela. Au même moment, je commencais à travailler sur le LP d’Étienne O’Leary et j’ai décidé que tout ce qui sortirait à partir du numéro 50 serait les sorties historiques de Tenzier. Quatre ou cinq mois après, j’ai pris la décision de retourner à l’école pour poursuivre mes études doctorales. Subséquemment, j’ai arrêté de jouer de la musique pour me concentrer sur mes recherches. C’est devenu évident que Tenzier serait un véhicule parfait pour réconcilier mes intêrêts académiques et mon passé de musicien. Ça m’a permis de garder le contact avec des musiciens et des artistes en art visuel et d’y contribuer quelque chose de concret. Après Tenzier 001, j’ai arrêté de jouer de la musique et la série s’est arrêté là.

Quels sont tes plans futurs? Peux-tu nous donner un petit aperçu de tes prochaines parutions et activités?

Je ne peux pas vraiment discuter des parutions puisque je ne me suis pas encore assis pour en discuter avec les parties intéressées. J’ai l’intention de publier un LP cet automne et je suis présentement en train de digitaliser beaucoup de matériel super intéressant. Chaque année, j’essaie d’organiser un évènement ou une sorte de rétrospective et cet automne, je travaille avec Jean-Pierre Boyer, qui produisait de la vidéo expérimentale au début des années 70. Il a inventé son propre synthétiseur vidéo, qu’il a nommé le Boyétizeur, alors nous allons présenter son travail et des performances live.

J’étais super content de voir une collaboration entre Gisèle Ricard et Bernard Bonnier sur le nouveau LP de Tenzier. Casse-Tête Musique Concrète est si déjanté. Connais-tu d’autre musique qu’il a enregistré?

C’est un album génial. Il y a aussi le Capac 7”, mais aucune autres parutions officielles. Je présume qu’il a d’autres matériel enregistré parce que Bernard Bonnier et Gisèle Ricard possèdaient un studio ensemble. Bernard est décédé, mais son fils a probablement des bobines quelque-part dans un sous-sol. Ça vaudrait la peine d’y jeter un coup d’oeil.

Quelle est la musique du Québec la plus bizarre que tu aies écouté?

Selon moi, le terme ‘musique bizarre’ n’est pas péjoratif. C’est de la musique intelligente parce qu’elle force l’auditeur à écouter différemment et le transporte ailleurs. Le Québec a tellement produit de musique bizarre, en particulier dans les années 80. Beaucoup de gens sortaient des cassettes (comme maintenant, je pense) et on peut trouver des trucs vraiment formidables, des démos et d’autres échantillions sonores étranges, à l’Oblique. Le premier nom qui me vient en tête est Les Biberons Bâtis qui était le projet de Bruno Tanguay, aussi connu sous le nom Satan Bélanger. Avant Les Biberons Bâtis, Bruno était dans un groupe appelé Turbine Depress, de la musique aussi très singulière. Je pense que tu aimerais beaucoup Les Biberons Bâtis.

Discographie de Tenzier (Jusqu’à maintenant)

  • TNZR001 – Dominic Vanchesteing, Eric Fillion, Alexandre St-Onge – Untitled [Mini CD, 2010]
  • TNZR050 – Étienne O’Leary – Films Et Musiques Originales (1966 – 1968) [LP, 2010]
  • TNZR051 – Le Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Québec – 1973 [LP, 2011]
  • TNZR052 – Bernard Gagnon – Musique Électronique (1975-1983) [LP, 2012]
  • TNZR053 – Gisèle Ricard – Électroacoustique (1980-1987) [LP, 2013]

Imprint :: Amok Recordings

Amok_Recordings-weirdcanada_photo-web.jpg

The sonorous expanse that is Toronto’s artistic vestibule is speckled with independent start-up labels, each orbiting uniquely around the city’s cache of raw talent. In this voluminous climate, Justin Scott Gray, founder of Amok Recordings, is attuned to the ‘global character’ of Canada’s do-it-yourself and do-it-together musical landscape.

Creative collaboration between projects emerges as a new language, the semiotics of which —- given the prominence of talent and people motivated in providing it with a collective roof —- speak to the ever loudening typologies that strengthen the presence of our northernly crucibles. It is here, in this space of global cross-pollination, that Amok Recordings has established itself as a progenitor of music that navigates across borders, both geographically and stylistically speaking. We spoke to the founder of the Toronto via Elliot Lake experimental label about Amok’s birth, evolution and ongoing communication.

Bleepus Chris – Stalker

Jay Morritt – Love You More Than I Miss You

Justin Scott Gray – Octatactics

RCL Commission – Been Out In The Field Too Long

 

Joshua Robinson: How did Amok start? What was the creative push behind the inception of the imprint? Did it begin as a way for you to share your own music?

Justin Scott Gray: Amok “officially” began in June 2006. However, the imprint name dates back to around 2000 (appearing on various CD-r releases but without a real organization behind it). When Amok was first conceived, it aimed to serve several purposes:

  1. to create a free online archive for limited edition and out-of-print releases
  2. to present digital music in a way that felt like it was part of the overall package (as opposed to just some text on archive.org)
  3. to invite other like-minded artists from around the world to present their work in a similar way
  4. to become more of an arts-collective rather than a label (note: there used to be a ‘visual arts’ section on the website and we would showcase portfolios)

As you grow, your inspiration obviously changes… For the last few years we have been focusing more on new releases and selling physical packages, rather than just archiving old material via free download. I guess the short answer to your question is yes – it began partly as a way to present the music that I was involved in.

You recently returned to Toronto from Elliot Lake, Ontario. Can you comment on how these geographic spaces influenced you differently?

<<< read more >>>

Elliot Lake is a pretty depressing place… It began as a booming uranium mine town. Then, in the early ’90s, all of the mining companies closed. With a crippled economy, the city council moved quickly to create a for-profit company (comprised of the mayor and most of the councillors) and they re-branded the city after their new company name: “Retirement Living”. They inherited tons of liquidated cottage-homes from the former mine companies and started busing-in pensioners to fill the homes and pay the taxes.

So in comparison with Toronto (where there are actually people under the age of 65), it’s a lot different! As far as the influence goes… The lack of culture really made me want to create something.

Micro-independents and DIY labels seem to be incredibly prevalent, especially in the major hubs such as Toronto, which is home to Amok. Can you comment on what it is about the creative ethos of Toronto that makes it such a hot-spot for labels and musicians alike?

Yeah – Bandcamp alone seems to have spawned hundreds of new labels. Not being facetious but it’s probably just the sheer density of people that makes Toronto a “hot-spot”… I think that with the way technology has evolved, pretty much anyone, anywhere, can make a label. You really don’t have to be in a big city to do it! There’s just more people there doing it.

Your releases seem to cover the spectrum of physical mediums quite well. However, there seems to be a bit of a preference for cassette. What does the cassette medium mean to you?

Well, it is an analog format and every release that we put out has a digital counterpart… Personally, I like comparing the sound of the digital vs. the analog… I also like that it has two sides because this can really influence the way an artist works. I know that when I was making my last solo record Adult Music I really focused on the two-side format. I’ve also read articles about what it means to some other people. A few have noted that cassette culture is a “rebellion in the face of the iPhone generation,” while others chalk it up to plain nostalgia. It’s probably a bit of everything. I would release music on all formats, if I could afford it.

Stylistically, your catalogue and the musicians who you have worked with are incredibly diverse. Is the strength of the electronic, ambient, and experimental communities in Toronto a reason for the prevalence of the genres on your imprint?

To be honest, I have no idea what’s been going in Toronto… Like I said, I’ve been in Elliot Lake for the past few months and before that I was in Sarnia (which is as equally depressing as Elliot Lake). Also, we don’t have any other Toronto artists involved with the label (except JEFFTHEWORLD, but he makes chiptune and that’s a whole culture unto itself). The label catalogue is pretty much just music that I personally find interesting and that I think would fit together in some strange way. I don’t really focus on any given geographic location and I tend to work with people that I just think are genuine.

Collaboration between artists under the Amok imprint seems to be a pretty important point of distinction for your label. Why is cross-pollination between creative projects important to you?

I think that when someone is being genuine they are likely just “doing-what-they-do”, and so if you set up a network of people who “do-music” then it just makes sense that collaborations will happen… I have always found it interesting how a specific artist can act like an ingredient in a new recipe. And, as a fan, I’ve always enjoyed dissecting music and imagining what a particular artist might be adding to any given project (it becomes even more interesting once you know a particular artist’s body of work).

There is some branching out of Amok to work with musicians residing beyond Canada. Can you comment on how this ‘global’ character might distinguish Amok from other Toronto-based imprints? What international communities have you been able to develop working relationships with?

It’s funny because I know that Weird Canada has some strict guidelines for only covering Canadian artists, and as we discussed, much of the catalogue is comprised of releases by artists from other countries… Dare I say that this aspect of Amok is perhaps what makes us even more Canadian than your average label? Melting Pot 101.

Seriously though, I don’t feel connected to any particular city. Yes, we’re Canadian. And yes, we’re currently in Toronto. But that doesn’t matter… We could still be surrounded by the elderly folks of Elliot Lake and the label would continue in the same way. That probably sets us apart from other Toronto labels.

We’ve put out releases by artists from six countries and really created some strong networks in both France (Strasbourg) and the United States (Los Angeles). In France, I have been working with Nicolas Boutines who has brought us several amazing projects including his own collaborations with Pascal Gully (who has released music on John Zorn’s Tzadik label). In LA, I have been working with Jean-Paul Garnier. He is an extremely hard-working and very talented sound artist who has connected us with many other artists and organizations within the U.S. He’s even released the work of some Amok artists on his Welcome To The 21st net label.

Canada is a bellowing breeding ground for DIY and independent musicians and record imprints. What is it about the creative climate of Canada that inspires and facilitates this sort of artistic fervour?

I’m not sure what it is. If we’re talking specifically about “the industry“ then maybe it’s because of how spoiled we are as Canadians. A LOT of releases seem to have FACTOR or various Arts Council logos on them. There’s so much incentive for young people to ”take a couple of years off of school, start an indie band and hit the road for a while.” I’m a little jealous because we have had zero funding and it’s been an uphill battle.

One final question: Do you have any upcoming releases that you are particularly excited about?

I’m still pretty excited about the Ross Chait album that we just put out. As for upcoming releases, we’re getting ready to put out a new Somnaphon tape/CD and I’m really thrilled that he’s going to be a part of the label. His work is VERY interesting. FYI: he also runs his own label, Bicephalic Records, which is definitely worth checking out!

Amok Recordings Discography (to-date):

2013

Ross Wallace Chait – Routine Symptoms
Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 3
the One (family) – the One (family)
Ross Wallace Chait & loopool – Digressive Generation
Debbie Gaines – HORTUS (rappel libre!)
b.burroughs – Paraded And Thus; My Hair Has Held All The Smells Of Your Body
Canti – Gale Warning For Lake Superior EP
the One (family) – Live @ SOMETHINGseries

2012

mic&rob – Archi Cons (suite)
Justin Scott Gray – All In Time
Cathartech – Disquietudes
USB Orchestra – Phase One (2005-2009)
b.burroughs – *sniper function(bodily)
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 2
Justin Scott Gray – My New Synth
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass The Bugs And The Breeze
Justin Scott Gray – Segue Heil
Debbie Gaines – Mirror, Mirror
loopool – Wears A Golden Hat
Jay Morritt – No Good Times
mic&rob – Live And Let Lie
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume III
JEFFTHEWORLD – Disc+
EKT – EKT

2011

Chevalier – Heart and Soul (Ambient Communications Vol. 2)
Justin Scott Gray – In Audible
loopool – *Looks To Feudalism: the One (family) – C.$’ta
the One (family) – Sprout_Tiers
b.burroughs – bayis, sweet…

2010

NILL – Meeba
Rion C – Live In The Chemical Valley
t h i e f – Expedition
Chevalier – O.S. V1: Ambient Communications
t h i e f – REC.
This Is Esophagus – Love, What Is

2009

James Provencher – Bird Calls Home In Time For Christmas
This Is Esophagus – Terra Firma EP
Brother’s Pus – A Mirror To Fool An Audience For A Play An Audience To Fool A Mirror For A Play
James Provencher – AM Radio
James Provencher – Five Miles To God’s Country
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume II
USB Orchestra – Slaves
James Provencher – Poverty-Line Assault
P*Taz – Ituri EP

2008

USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume I
Bad Bolster Boycott – Margarita EP
Lights Streaming Through The Sounds – Sunrise EP
USB Orchestra – I am ok
Polymath – Polymath EP

2006

Dead Seed Recordings – From Our Heart Will Flow Rivers Of Living Water
USB Orchestra – Pentuhtook
A-Mo & Amplifier Machine – Y’all Fatties Come Chew Some Freedom!
RCL Commission – RCL Commission
Bleepus Christ – Nature
Bleepus Christ – Merry Christmas, Jesus Christ
USB Orchestra – Be Free.
Bleepus Christ – Listen-In Amplifier
Bleepus Christ – bye, mean.

L’immensité sonore qu’est le vestibule artistique de Toronto est parsemée d’étiquettes indépendantes toutes neuves, chacune orbitant de manière unique autour de la ville bouillant de talent. Plongé dans ce volumineux climat, Justin Scott Gray, le fondateur d’Amok Recordings, est accoutumé à la disposition générale pour le fait-maison et le travail d’équipe harmonieux qui régit le paysage musical canadien.

De la collaboration créative entre projets émerge un nouveau langage, une sémantique qui – étant donné l’afflux de talents et de gens motivés à offrir un toit collectif – parle aux typologies de plus en plus présentes, celles qui renforcent la présence de nos creusets nordiques. C’est ici, au centre de cet espace de pollinisation croisée, qu’Amok Recordings s’est établi comme progéniteur de musique qui navigue au-delà des frontières, autant géographiques que stylistiques. Nous avons parlé avec le fondateur de l’étiquette expérimentale, en provenance de Toronto via Elliot Lake, de sa naissance, de son évolution et de sa constante communication.

Bleepus Chris – Stalker

Jay Morritt – Love You More Than I Miss You

Justin Scott Gray – Octatactics

RCL Commission – Been Out In The Field Too Long

 

Joshua Robinson: Comment Amok a-t-il démarré? Quelle était la poussée créative derrière la mise en place de l’étiquette? Est-ce que cela a commencé comme une façon de partager ta propre musique?

Justin Scott Gray: Amok a démarré ‘’officiellement’’ en juin 2006. Par contre, le nom de l’étiquette date plutôt de 2000 (il apparait sur différentes publications de CD-r sans réelle organisation derrière lui). Quand Amok à démarré, c’était dans le but de servir plusieurs objectifs:

  1. Créer une archive en ligne pour les éditions limitées et les sorties en rupture de stock
  2. Présenter la musique en format digital de manière à ce qu’elle semble faire partie de l’ensemble (et non comme seulement du texte sur archive.org)
  3. Inviter des artistes aux points de vues/intérêtes similaires à partager leur travail selon un canevas similaire
  4. Devenir un collectif artistique plutôt qu’une étiquette (note: Auparavant, il y avait une section ‘Arts visuels’ sur le site où nous partagions des portfolios.)

En grandissant, l’inspiration change… Au cours des dernières années, nous nous sommes concentré de plus en plus sur les nouvelles sorties et les paquets physiques à vendre au lieu de seulement alimenter nos archives avec des téléchargements gratuits. Je pense que la réponse courte à la question est oui – cela à commencé en partie comme une façon de partager mes propres projets.

Tu es récemment revenu à Toronto après avoir habité à Elliot Lake, en Ontario. Peux-tu partager de quelles manières ces espaces géographiques t’ont influencé?

Elliot Lake est un endroit assez déprimant… Ça s’est développé au départ avec les mines d’uranium. Pendant les années 90, toutes les compagnies minières ont plié bagage. Avec une économie précaire, la Ville s’est adapté et a créé un organisme à but lucratif (composé principalement du maire et de ses conseillés) et ils ont ensuite présenté la ville à l’aide de leur nouveau nom d’organisme: ‘Retirement Living’. Ils avaient hérité d’une tonne de maisons-chalets à bas prix des compagnies minières et ils ont commencé à convoyer plein de retraités dans ces maisons pour qu’elles soient habitées et rapportent des taxes.

<<< read more >>>

Alors, en comparaison avec Toronto (où il y a effectivement des gens de moins de 65 ans qui habitent), c’est vraiment différent! Puis, en ce qui concerne l’influence du lieu… l’absence de culture m’a vraiment donné envie de créer quelque chose.

Les mini-étiquettes indépendantes et fait-maison semblent incroyablement présentes, surtout dans les grands centres comme Toronto, d’où vient Amok. Peux-tu partager ce qui dans l’éthos créatif de Toronto rend les étiquettes et les artistes si prolifiques?

Oui – Bandcamp semble à lui seul avoir frayé le chemin à une centaine d’étiquettes. Sans être facétieux, c’est probablement la densité de population qui fait de Toronto un point si ‘chaud’. Je pense qu’avec la manière dont la technologie a évolué, pratiquement n’importe qui n’importe où peut démarrer une étiquette. Vous n’avez pas besoin d’être dans une grande ville pour le faire! Il y a seulement plus de gens qui le font dans ces endroits-là.

Tes sorties semblent couvrir très bien le large spèctre des copies physiques. Par contre, il semble y avoir une préférence pour la cassette. Qu’est ce que la cassette représente pour toi?

Eh bien, c’est un format analogique et chaque sortie que nous faisons a son équvalent numérique. Personnellement, j’aime comparer le son du numérique et de l’analogique… J’aime aussi le fait que la cassette a deux faces parce que ça peut grandement influencer la manière de travailler de l’artiste. Je sais que pendant que je travaillais sur mon dernier album solo Adult Music, je me suis vraiment concentré sur le format deux-faces. J’ai aussi lu des articles pour savoir quelle importance ce format a pour d’autres gens. Quelques personnes semblent penser que le culture de la cassette est une “rébellion contre la génération iPhone”, alors que d’autres l’associent à de la simple nostalgie. C’est probablement un peu de tout. Je sortirais de la musique sous tous les formats, si je pouvais me le permettre.

Le catalogue et les artistes avec lesquels tu choisis de travailler ont un style très diversifié. Est-ce que la force des scènes électronique, ambiante et expérimentale de Toronto sont responsables de leur abondance sur ton étiquette?

Pour être honnête, je n’ai aucune idée de ce qui se passe à Toronto…. Comme je le disais, j’ai passé les derniers mois à Elliot Lake et juste avant j’étais à Sarnia (qui est aussi déprimant qu’Elliot Lake). Aussi, nous n’avons pas d’autres artistes de Toronto qui font partie de l’étiquette (sauf JEFFTHEWORLD, mais il fait du chiptune et c’est vraiment une culture en soi). Le catalogue de l’étiquette est pas mal juste de la musique que je trouve intéressante et qui, je crois, peut former un tout cohérent, d’une certaine façon. Je ne pense pas beaucoup aux origines géographiques des artistes et je m’entoure en général de gens qui me semblent authentiques.

Les collaborations entre artistes d’Amok Recordings semblent être un élèment distinctif important pour l’étiquette. Pourquoi la pollinisation croisée entre projets créatifs est-elle si importante pour toi?

Je pense que quand les gens sont authentiques, ils font d’emblée “ce-qu’ils-ont-à-faire”, alors si on connecte ensemble une bande de gens qui font de la musique, les collaborations naissent d’elles-mêmes. J’ai toujours trouvé intéressant qu’un artiste en particulier puisse être l’ingrédient d’une nouvelle recette. Et, en tant que fan, j’ai toujours aimé disséquer la musique et imaginer ce qu’un artiste en particulier pourrait apporter à un projet (ça devient encore plus intéressant quand tu connais bien l’ensemble de l’oeuvre d’un artiste).

Il y a une ouverture chez Amok à travailler avec des musiciens résidant ailleurs qu’au Canada. Peux-tu nous dire comment cette caractéristque ‘globale’ pourrait permettre à Amok de se distinguer des autres étiquettes de Toronto? Avec quelles communautés internationales as-tu développé des liens?

C’est drôle parce que je sais à quel point c’est une ligne directrice importante de Weird Canada que de couvrir seulement du contenu canadien et, comme nous en avons discuté, une bonne partie du catalogue comprend des sorties d’artistes d’autres pays. Est-ce que je peux me permettre de dire que cet aspect d’Amok est peut-être ce qui nous rend encore plus canadien? Melting pop 101.

Sérieusement, je ne me sais pas connecté à une ville en particulier. Oui, nous sommes canadiens. Et oui, nous sommes présentement basés à Toronto. Mais ça n’a pas d’importance. Nous pourrions être entourés des aînés d’Elliot Lake et l’étiquette se comporterait de la même manière. C’est probablement ce qui nous différencie des autres étiquettes de Toronto.

Nous avons produit les albums d’artistes de six pays différents et avons créé des réseaux importants en France (Strasbourg) et aux États-Unis (Los Angeles). En France, j’ai travaillé avec Nicolas Boutines, qui nous a apporté plusieurs projets étonnants, incluant une de ses propres collaborations avec Pascal Gully (qui a sortie de la musique sur l’étiquette Tzadik de John Zorn). À Los Angeles, j’ai travaillé avec Jean-Paul Garnier. C’est un artiste du son qui travaille extrêmement fort, qui est bourré de talent, et qui a connecté avec plusieurs artistes et organisations aux États-Unis. Il a même publié le travail de quelques-uns des artistes d’Amok sur son label web, Welcome to the 21st.

Le Canada est le terrain d’un nombre incroyable de musiciens indépendants et d’étiquettes fait-maison. Qu’est-ce qui, dans ce climat créatif canadien, favorise et inspire si bien cette genre de ferveur artistique?

Je ne suis pas certain. Si nous parlons principalement de “l’industrie”, c’est peut-être parce que nous sommes si gâtés au Canada. BEAUCOUP d’albums semblent porter le logo de FACTOR ou du Conseil des Arts. Les jeunes sont tellement incités à ‘’prendre une année sabbatique ou deux, à créer un groupe de musique et à partir en tournée un temps”. Je suis un peu jaloux parce que nous n’avons eu aucun financement et que ça a été une longue bataille.

Une dernière question: Y a-t-il une publication prochaine qui t’excites particulièrement?

Je suis encore très excité par l’album de Ross Chait qu’on vient de sortir. Pour les publications à venir, nous sommes en train de préparer la sortie d’un nouveau Somnaphon en format cassette/CD et je suis très content qu’il fasse partie de notre étiquette. Son travail est VRAIMENT intéressant. Pour votre info: Il a aussi sa propre étiquette, Bicephalic Records, qui vaut vraiment le détour!

La discographie d’Amok Recordings (à ce jour)

2013

Ross Wallace Chait – Routine Symptoms
Justin Scott Gray – Adult Music
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 3
the One (family) – the One (family)
Ross Wallace Chait & loopool – Digressive Generation
Debbie Gaines – HORTUS (rappel libre!)
b.burroughs – Paraded And Thus; My Hair Has Held All The Smells Of Your Body
Canti – Gale Warning For Lake Superior EP
the One (family) – Live @ SOMETHINGseries

2012

mic&rob – Archi Cons (suite)
Justin Scott Gray – All In Time
Cathartech – Disquietudes
USB Orchestra – Phase One (2005-2009)
b.burroughs – *sniper function(bodily)
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass 2
Justin Scott Gray – My New Synth
loopool & the One (family) – Allpass The Bugs And The Breeze
Justin Scott Gray – Segue Heil
Debbie Gaines – Mirror, Mirror
loopool – Wears A Golden Hat
Jay Morritt – No Good Times
mic&rob – Live And Let Lie
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume III
JEFFTHEWORLD – Disc+
EKT – EKT

2011

Chevalier – Heart and Soul (Ambient Communications Vol. 2)
Justin Scott Gray – In Audible
loopool – *Looks To Feudalism: the One (family) – C.$’ta
the One (family) – Sprout_Tiers
b.burroughs – bayis, sweet…

2010

NILL – Meeba
Rion C – Live In The Chemical Valley
t h i e f – Expedition
Chevalier – O.S. V1: Ambient Communications
t h i e f – REC.
This Is Esophagus – Love, What Is

2009

James Provencher – Bird Calls Home In Time For Christmas
This Is Esophagus – Terra Firma EP
Brother’s Pus – A Mirror To Fool An Audience For A Play An Audience To Fool A Mirror For A Play
James Provencher – AM Radio
James Provencher – Five Miles To God’s Country
USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume II
USB Orchestra – Slaves
James Provencher – Poverty-Line Assault
P*Taz – Ituri EP

2008

USB Orchestra – Down The Stairs: Volume I
Bad Bolster Boycott – Margarita EP
Lights Streaming Through The Sounds – Sunrise EP
USB Orchestra – I am ok
Polymath – Polymath EP

2006

Dead Seed Recordings – From Our Heart Will Flow Rivers Of Living Water
USB Orchestra – Pentuhtook
A-Mo & Amplifier Machine – Y’all Fatties Come Chew Some Freedom!
RCL Commission – RCL Commission
Bleepus Christ – Nature
Bleepus Christ – Merry Christmas, Jesus Christ
USB Orchestra – Be Free.
Bleepus Christ – Listen-In Amplifier
Bleepus Christ – bye, mean.