Inferred Views // Ex-Libris :: Jacob McArthur Mooney


jake_pivot-web

Jacob McArthur Mooney is a poet, blogger, literary critic, and host of Toronto’s excellent series of poetry readings, Pivot.

How did Pivot start?

Pivot was started six years ago by the poets Carey Toane and Angela Hibbs, and before ending up in my lap was passed through Elisabeth de Mariaffi and Sachiko Murakami. Before that, even, it was known as the I.V. Lounge Reading Series and hosted at the I.V. Lounge by first Paul Vermeersch and later Alex Boyd.

I had been asked to take over a few times during those previous handoffs but wasn’t feeling up for it for various reasons around lifestyle and bad decision making. I took it over in 2012 and have been running the show with my wife, novelist Alexis von Konigslow, ever since.

What makes your poetry series different from other existing ones in Toronto?

A lot of those series don’t include windows and we have a rather large window.

Beyond the window, I would say Pivot is a rather blissfully unadorned series. Pivot contains no hyphens. It doesn’t do any reach out beyond the world of poetry and fiction and the occasional non-fict. It doesn’t try to be anything more than what it is. This is a big fucking city, you know? There is something out there for you no matter how weird and eccentric your tastes are, and so Pivot is there for that group of people: statistically insignificant until stretched across the landscape of a metropolis, who like to drink beer and be read to in the dark. So I would say that Pivot is very proudly niche in a way that might be unique, and that’s the only way I could ever have it. Some nights it’s just me, my hangdog Andy Kaufmann schtick, and the only room full of people in this whole city I can stand. It’s a small target and we want to nail it.

Do you use different approach when you work with emerging artists vs established ones?

There are no such things as “established artists” in poetry. The only two kind of poets are emerging and deceased.

But if you’re talking about age or publication record, then no. The new poets are generally better readers than the older poets, is all I can think of.

Is working with emerging poets more challenging than working with established ones? Could you elaborate on what makes working with emerging poets unique?

Okay, so let’s throw out my quick “No” above, and assume meaning for the term “emerging poets,” and that it means, roughly: young poets who haven’t published books. I will say that they should know that they are the best moment Canadian poetry has ever had. The generation of poets born, I’ll say, between 1984 and 1993 (let us be shits and call them “The Mulroney Poets”) are the most consistently interesting and deepest and most outrageously ambitious group we’ve ever seen. I’ve tried to articulate why this may be and have at best, two theories.

One, they have the opportunity, if they wish to take it, to be completely over the idea of “Canada.” We spent a long time in the literary culture of this country trying to figure out how to be simultaneously liberal and nationalist, and it didn’t work out because that’s an inherently bullshit position. The first big generation of Canadian writers, the boomers and their slightly older siblings, fought on and on about that. Dennis Lee is a hero of mine and a good friend but the battle he supposed in geopolitical terms in, say, Civil Elegies, or the one rendered in ecological terms by Farley Mowat, those have all been lost. These Mulroney kids are coming into adulthood at a time where the moral and environmental apocalypse being furthered by Canada is greater than the one being furthered by every other Western country. They are coming up in the only period in any living person’s memory where the Canadian Prime Minister sits to the right of the American President, and so much of that disco nationalism stuff demanded a Good Canada/Bad America dialectic. Which is no way to build a national culture, as it depends on the cultures of other nations to exist. So I would say that, though they are inexorably fucked in all the meaningful economic and moral ways, the end of a cultural Canada does them a lot of good as poets. There’s a bigger world out there.

And secondly, there’s a bigger world out there. I think that this group is so used to the repetitive smashing together of cultural products: near and far, high and low, old and new, that the reach of their metaphors can be so much more ambitious and natural than for poets born even a few years earlier. A lot of this is the internet but it’s also the Internet of Thoughts, you know. It’s how those technological gadgets reconfigure the brain if you’re young enough to be born into them. Juxtaposition is finished, I think, it doesn’t exist anymore. So you get crazy shit happening out there with people like Kayla Czaga and Michael Prior and Vincent Colistro (or Jessica Bebenek or Liz Howard or all those people in Vancouver) where an amount of figurative reach that might seem showy or performative for even our more culturally-literate older poets (McGimpsey, Rogers, Babstock) just flow off the tongue and there’s no ta-dah attached, it’s just culture speaking.

Your website mentions that you receive no funding other than PWYC – how do you make that work and how can others who might be interested in starting out in that environment manage that?

I pass a bucket at the break and people are encouraged to put money in the bucket. At the end of the break I take the money out of the bucket and divide it equally between all the readers. Simple. Anyone can do it. But we’re entertaining the idea of going out for public funding, in the interest of paying those readers more money.

In your opinion, what are the gaps/opportunities in Toronto’s poetry scene? What kind of work doesn’t get as much celebration as it should?

We are very lucky in Toronto. It’s a good scene and a generally welcoming world. If you were so inclined, you could go out and see something decent every night of the week. I would say that we lack people willing to do the less-glamourous work of scene buttressing, but that’s not unique to the city or to poetry. Nobody likes to fill out forms or cold-call venues or comparison shop for paper.

My big worry is probably, with the growth of unfunded internships and the like, is that much of that work becomes the speciality of rich people’s kids and grandkids. And we already have such a demographic problem in poetry (I’ll let spoken word off the hook on this generalization), it’s so Caucasian and upper-middle class and socioeconomically riskless already that I’m concerned that another thirty years of filtering out Grown Up White Trash like myself will render it static.

What are Pivot’s plans in the near future as a poetry series, e.g. whether or not you are envisioning any changes to Pivot’s scope or focus?

More younger poets this year. Also, I think we’ll bring in fewer readers with brand-new books. I’d like to have people do Pivot like 6 months after their book is out, otherwise it just gets lost in the rush of readings and releases and you end up with, like, four opportunities to go hear a given poet read in a week. We’re going to drift out of that game.

Jacob McArthur Mooney, le poète, blogueur et critique littéraire, est également animateur de Pivot, une excellente série de soirées dédiées à la lecture de poésie à Toronto.

Comment a commencé Pivot?

La série a commencé il y a six ans, avec les poètes Carey Toane et Angela Hibbs, puis elle est passée par les mains d’Elisabeth de Mariaffi et de Sachiko Murakami avant de tomber dans les miennes. En fait même avant ça, c’était la I.V. Lounge Serie, elle avait lieu au I.V. Lounge et elle a été animée par Paul Vermeersch d’abord et par Alex Boyd ensuite.

Quand il y a eu ces changements, on m’a demandé de m’en charger à quelques reprises, mais je ne me sentais pas prêt à m’en occuper pour diverses raisons (relatives à mon style de vie et à de mauvaises décisions que j’ai prises). En 2012 j’ai pris la série en main, et je m’en occupe depuis avec ma femme, la romancière Alexis von Konigslow.

Qu’est-ce qui différencie Pivot des autres soirées de poésie à Toronto?

La plupart d’entre elles n’offrent pas de vitrine : nous, nous en offrons une bonne.

Au-delà de ça, je dirais que Pivot est merveilleusement sans prétention. La série ne contient aucun trait d’union, elle ne cherche pas à sortir du domaine de la poésie, de la fiction et (occasionnellement) de la non-fiction. Elle n’essaie pas d’être plus que ce qu’elle est. Toronto, c’est une maudite grosse ville : c’est sûr qu’il va y avoir quelque chose pour t’intéresser, même si tes goûts sont vraiment bizarres et excentriques. Et Pivot est là pour ce groupe de gens – statistiquement insignifiant jusqu’à ce qu’on l’étende sur tout le territoire d’une métropole – qui aime boire de la bière et assister à une lecture dans le noir. Alors, je dirais que Pivot se positionne dans un créneau d’une façon plutôt unique, et je ne voudrais pas que ce soit autrement. Il y a des soirs où il n’y a que moi, mon chien de poche Andy Kaufmann qui fait ses trucs, et cette salle remplie de gens – la seule que j’arrive à supporter dans toute la ville. C’est un objectif très précis et on veut l’atteindre.

Est-ce que ton approche de travail est différente avec les artistes émergents et ceux établis?

En poésie, les « artistes établis », ça n’existe pas. Il n’y a que deux types de poètes : les émergents et les morts.

Mais si tu fais référence à l’âge ou à la publication, alors non. La seule chose qui me vient en tête est que les jeunes poètes sont généralement de meilleurs orateurs que les plus vieux.

Est-ce qu’il est plus difficile de travailler avec des poètes émergents qu’avec ceux établis? Pourrais-tu décrire ce qui rend cette expérience unique de travail?

OK, oublions mon « Non » rapide de tout à l’heure et disons que « poètes émergents » veut dire grosso modo : jeunes poètes qui n’a pas encore publié un livre. Je dirais qu’ils devraient savoir qu’ils sont dans le meilleur moment de l’Histoire de la poésie canadienne. Les poètes nés, disons, entre 1984 et 1993 (on va être chien et les appeler les « poètes Mulroney ») sont ceux dont la création est la plus globalement intéressante et profonde : ils sont les plus scandaleusement ambitieux qu’on n’a jamais vus. J’ai essayé de déterminer pourquoi et, au mieux, j’ai deux théories.

La première : ils ont la chance, s’ils veulent la saisir, de complètement dépasser l’idée du « Canada ». Dans la culture littéraire canadienne, nous avons passé beaucoup de temps à essayer de comprendre comment être à la fois libéral et nationaliste, et ça n’a pas fonctionné parce que c’est carrément n’importe quoi comme position. La première grande génération d’écrivains canadiens (les baby-boomers et leurs frères et sœur aînés) n’arrêtait pas de débattre sur le sujet. Que ce soit le combat proposé par Dennis Lee – un de mes héros et un bon ami – en termes géopolitiques dans Civil Elegies ou encore celui décrit en termes écologiques par Farley Mowat, ils ont tous été perdus. Ces enfants de Mulroney arrivent à l’âge adulte à un moment où le cataclysme moral et environnemental aggravé par le Canada est encore pire que celuiprovoqué par les autres pays occidentaux. Ils arrivent durant la seule période de mémoire d’homme où le premier ministre canadien siège à la droite du président américain, et une partie importante de tout ce discours nationaliste reposait sur une dialectique gentil Canada/méchants États-Unis; ce qui n’est pas une façon de construire une culture nationale puisque son existence est dépendante de celle des autres pays. Alors, je dirais que même s’ils sont inexorablement foutus de toutes les façons économiques et morales possibles, la fin d’un Canada culturel les aide beaucoup en tant que poètes. Il y a tout un monde à découvrir.

La deuxième : il y a tout un monde à découvrir. Je pense que ce groupe est tellement habitué à ce que les produits culturels soient agglomérés ensemble qu’ils soient d’ici ou d’ailleurs, bons ou mauvais, nouveaux ou vieux, que leurs métaphores peuvent avoir une portée beaucoup plus naturellement ambitieuse par rapport à des poètes nés quelques années avant eux. C’est sûr que c’est principalement causé par l’Internet, mais l’Internet est aussi un réseau de pensées. C’est la façon dont ces gadgets technologiques reconfigurent le cerveau quand on est assez jeune pour avoir baigné dedans dès la naissance. Il n’y a plus de juxtaposition, je pense que c’est mort. Alors, il y a des gens qui font plein de trucs fous un peu partout, comme Kayla Czaga, Michael Prior et Vincent Colistro (ou encore Jessica Bebenek, Liz Howard ou tous ces personnes de Vancouver), avec un rayonnement figuratif impressionnant qui pourrait sembler tape-à-l’œil ou performatif par rapport aux valeurs culturelles de nos vieux poètes (McGimpsey, Rogers, Babstock); et ça glisse sur la langue et il n’y a pas de ta-dah, c’est juste la culture qui parle.

Le site internet mentionne que Pivot se finance uniquement par le principe « payez ce que vous voulez ». Comment est-ce que ça fonctionne? Quels trucs donnerais-tu à des gens intéressés par ce mode de financement?

Durant la pause, je me promène avec un seau en encourageant les gens à y mettre de l’argent; et après, je sors ce qui a été ramassé et je le divise également entre les lecteurs. C’est simple, n’importe qui peut le faire. Mais nous pensons commencer à chercher du financement public dans l’objectif de donner plus à nos lecteurs.

Selon toi, quelles sont les lacunes et les possibilités de la scène poétique de Toronto? Quel genre d’œuvre ne reçoit pas toute l’attention qu’il mérite?

À Toronto, nous sommes très chanceux. La scène est bonne, généralement accueillante. Si telle était ton envie, tu pourrais sortir et aller voir quelque chose de décent tous les soirs de la semaine. Je dirais que ce qu’il manque, c’est des gens voulant faire le travail moins prestigieux de soutien scénique, mais ce n’est pas propre à la ville ni à la poésie. Personne n’aime remplir des formulaires, faire des appels à froid pour trouver des lieux d’événements ou pour comparer les prix pour acheter du papier.

Ce qui m’inquiète le plus c’est que, avec l’augmentation du nombre de stages non rémunérés et de postes du genre, ça finisse par devenir la spécialité des enfants et petits-enfants de riches. On a déjà un gros problème démographique en poésie (mais je n’inclue pas les créations orales dans cette généralisation) : c’est déjà tellement blanc, classe moyenne supérieure et sans risques socioéconomiques… j’ai peur qu’une autre trentaine d’années à éliminer les vieux white trash comme moi finisse par rendre le domaine statique.

Dans un avenir rapproché, quel est le plan pour Pivot, par exemple en termes de séries poétiques, pensez-vous faire des changements?

Cette année : augmenter le nombre de poètes plus jeunes. Aussi, je pense qu’on va inviter moins de lecteurs qui viennent juste de publier un livre. J’aimerais que les gens viennent à peu près 6 mois après avoir sorti leur livre, sinon ça se perd parmitoutes les autres lectures du lancement, et tu te ramasses avec quelque chose comme quatre occasions d’aller entendre tel poète dans une même semaine. On veut s’éloigner de cette dynamique.




file under: Ex Libris, Far Shores, New Canadiana, ontario.

birthed: 2015-05-11

No Comments


Leave a Reply