Departure :: Morley Loon – Cree Songs


Mystic folk-psych drifting between a Native American tradition and the first wave of acoustic lysergia. Morley’s intimate Cree singing is augmented by woven strands of ethereal flute, hand percussion, and melancholic guitar, conjuring a dense empathetic miasma. One of the most affecting records I’ve ever heard. Found in a pile of CBC Northern Broadcast Recording 7″s I received from a friend and the only of its kind I’ve ever encountered. If you know anything about Morley Loon (who unfortunately passed away some years ago), please get in touch. A short history of recording sessions in this series can be found here (PDF). 500 copies pressed and distributed as promos.

Le trad-psych mystique qui flâne entre une tradition autochtone et la première vague d’acoustique-lysergique. Le chant cri et intime de Morley et augmenté par les éléments tissés de flûte céleste, des percussions à main, et de guitare mélancolique, en évoquant un miasme intense et empathique. Un des enregistrements les plus émouvants que j’ai jamais entendus. Je l’ai découvert dans un tas des 7” de CBC Northern Broadcast Recording que j’ai reçu d’un ami et c’est le seul de son genre que j’ai jamais rencontré. Si vous connaissez quelque chose à propos de Morley Loon (qui est malheureusement mort il y a quelques ans), s’il vous plaît, contactez-moi. Une courte histoire des séances d’enregistrement dans cette série se trouve ici (pdf). 500 numéros étaient imprimés et distribués en tant que promos.

Morley Loon – Agajee Dona Nooch (To hunt no more?) // Morley Loon – Deb Skum (My Own)




file under: 7", Departures Revisited, northwest territories.

birthed: 2010-07-22

14 comments


14 thoughts on “Departure :: Morley Loon – Cree Songs

  1. Hello,

    I had a dream with Morley Loon and David Campbell last night. We were in an Artic environment and I had asked David Campbell to introduce Morley as he was about to offer a concert. A canoe was filled with water and it turned to solid ice within moments.

    Thank you for this information about the record that was produced by CBC of Morley Loon’s songs. How do I get a copy of his songs? He produced a number of cassettes that he distributed to support his music. I might still have a copy of one if I look deep enough.

    Morley and I were good friends. I performed with Morley at a concert at Scheeteson, (formerly Dead Man Creek), in the interior of British Columbia. I was his hand drummer at that concert that included others such as David Campbell and Buffy St. Marie.

    Morley was concerned with the condition of the First Nations of Canada and the USA. He never refused to perform for the benefit of his Sisters and Brothers.

    When he contracted cancer, it was not hard to imagine the cause as he ate the fish and birds that lived in the Cree Nation that was polluted with Mercury from paper mills. He died as he lived, head on and with brave determination to continue on his next journey.

    It seems that his work is not finished yet, as his music and spirit has survived.

    Carl Rising-Moore

  2. While I didn’t take any classes at Manitou College I did spend a lot of time there visiting friends, playing guitar and talking native politics back in the early 1970’s. I still like to go to La Macaza every once in a while to check on our Algonquin traditional territory and the local pubs, etc.

  3. I am a Manitou alumni. Unbelieveable memories. Fantastic time listening and partying with Morley. Those were the days my friends. Chris, me and Ruth go up to Manitou at least every other year too. Can’t get it out of my system. Have very good memories with great people. Hope we can all get together someday- one last time.

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  5. J ‘ ai bien connu Morley en tant amoureuse dans les années 1981.
    Il avait été l’ élève de Domingo Cisnéros au collège Manitou.Il a aussi participé au projet Baie James superbe expo avec document catalogue des allemands Wittenborn/Bierget 1981 que tout le monde devrait prendre connaissance.J’ écoute toujours sa musique et il m’ a beaucoup influencé dans mon travail artistique et je lui dois beaucoup pour m’ avoir appris sur les Cri et les Innus . Merci Morley

  6. I knew Morley back in the early ’70s
    we hung out together and jammed. I used to have all of his recordings but have lost them through all of my moving around. I would really like to get replacements, if that would be possible?
    Thanks/merci
    Steven Hudson

  7. I played in a band with Morley Loon in 1966-67.
    We played at the St John’s Church Hall which hosted dances for native high school students in Sault Ste Marie.
    Morley was the lead singer/guitarplayer and fancied himself as a Mick Jagger. The band had no set members. It was whoever showed up and wanted to play. I went to school with two of the regular players, Bill Nothing and Andy Yesno. Willie Ottereyes and Buckley Petawabano, who went on to star in the CBC series “Adventures in Rainbow Country” also played.
    I was the only white guy who played on a regular basis. I guess the correct term now days would be non-native. All of the native guys that played in that group were great musicians.
    The band seemed to fill need for a lot of lonely native kids far away from home and Morley could get them dancing.
    Morley had an edge even as a teenager that great talents have. He like us all had his demons too.
    Bill Nothing wrote me several years ago of Morley’s untimely passing.

  8. Hi all,
    I lived with Morley as his girlfriend in the year 1978, I just found out those pages about him today. If you want some documents I went to Mistassini during that period and I have very nice slides from the family and landscape, and a good pic of him. Thanks for keeping his memory.

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  10. I came across an interview with Morley Loon in a book called “A River Drowned by Water” by Wittenborn/Biegert. There are some interesting biographical details in there about his life. I ordered the book from “Better World Books.”

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